Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


paywall

Two U.S. newspaper publishers in the Dow Jones Local Media Group will begin charging for online content in January, paidContent reported yesterday. The San Joaquin Media Group and SouthCoast Media Group will roll out at least partial paywalls.

Registered members to SouthCoast sites will be able to view 10 free articles and videos each month, while unregistered users will be able to view three free items a month. San Joaquin Media Group publishes Recordnet.com, which reported that some content, such as blogs, weather, classified advertising, calendars, puzzles and national and international news, will remain free for all visitors, as well as three visits per month for local news content.

The rate for an all-access subscription to Recordnet.com will be US$2.67 per week for new subscribers. For current print subscribers, unlimited online access will cost an additional 77 cents per week.

"Recordnet.com has established its value with readers and advertisers in the communities it serves," said Roger Coover, president of San Joaquin Media Group and publisher of the Record, according to the Web site. "This shift asks readers to recognize that value irrespective of whether they read the newspaper in print or online."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-22 19:23

In the category of "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em," the world's most powerful search engine has retooled its approach to content aggregation, possibly avoiding future copyright infringement liability.

Google on Tuesday announced in a blog post by Senior Business Product Manager Josh Cohen that it had adjusted its First Click Free programme, The Associated Press reported Wednesday. The technology change makes it possible for publishers to limit readers to five unpaid page views per day before redirecting them to a subscription form, Google spokesman Chris Gaither told sfnblog Wednesday via e-mail.

The change comes in response to repeated complaints by news publishers that Google searches let potential subscribers circumvent paywalls. Google's answer to date had been for publishers to recode content so that it would be de-indexed. This response was deemed unsatisfactory in that, as Cohen observed during a townhall at the Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday, news publishers can hardly afford to be undiscoverable.

The technical problem, as Gaither explained it to sfnblog, was that Google had a strict policy against redirection of readers, which is a mechanism called cloaking often used by unethical Web site owners. Thus, to respect redirection to a subscription form was to permit a form of cloaking, which Google's search engine was previously coded not to do.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-08 15:42

Bloomberg LP may charge up to US$1,000 per year for access to some news on its Web site, the Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday. Although Bloomberg would not confirm WSJ's report - the two are financial news rivals - it did say it is "in the process of evaluating various approaches," according to paidContent.

Bloomberg.com is currently free, and the site's users already do not have access to all the financial data professional users pay for, either through subscriptions or through Bloomberg's special terminals, common in newsrooms and financial firms.

Kevin Krim, head of Bloomberg's online consumer media division, is reported to have said some users could be charged between $600 and $1,000 for some content they currently can access on the site for free, paidContent reported.

Bloomberg last month bought BusinessWeek magazine, which also has plans to charge for online content and ramp up its print edition, according to MediaWeek.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-05 21:08

The New York Times may soon begin to charge for online content. "We're within weeks of a decision," Executive Editor Bill Keller said Saturday.

The newspaper's management expected to make a decision by late summer, but are still weighing the complicated issue. Although charging for some online content would bring in subscription revenues, that potential revenue could cut into the millions in advertising dollars, as online advertisers want to reach the largest amount of readers as possible, Clark Hoyt reported.

"It's a much tougher, more complicated decision than it seems to all the armchair experts. There is no clear consensus on the right way to go," Keller said, according to The Times.

Payment options include charging for premium content, introducing subscription elements, micropayments or perhaps forming a consortium with other newspaper groups, Brand Republic reported today. "The difficulty in reaching a decision will likely have ramifications for the rest of the newspaper industry, which is looking to the New York Times as an indication for what it might try," the article stated.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-02 21:58

The Wall Street Journal has been used as an example time and again as having mastered the paid/free online transformation - a fine line many publishers continue to struggle with. In December, those attending the 62nd World Newspaper Congress can hear the chief of Dow Jones, the Journal's parent company, explain exactly how the conversion was performed.

The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) announced Saturday that Les Hinton has been added to the programme of the World Newspaper Congress to be held December 1-3 in Hyderabad, India.

In addition to how to monetize Web content, Hinton is expected to discuss Professional Edition, a premium service the Journal launched on October 21.

Professional Edition delivers to mobile handsets a selection of digitised news articles which are tailored to the subscriber's industry.

Following the Congress, WAN-IFRA is offering a study tour in India from December 4 to 7 to examine outsourcing and offshoring across the value chain.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-02 16:44

New York's Newsday today announced that its online content will cost US$5 per week beyond the public service basics as of Wednesday. The move, which Newsday called "pioneering," follows a trend of paid content increasingly bandied about the news industry, Reuters reported today.

According to The New York Times, the Newsday paywall has limited revenue-raising potential: 75 percent of Long Island - the geographic region the newspaper chiefly serves - has been promised unfettered access to the Web site through a partnership with Optimum Online, the local cable company. Print subscribers retain unfettered access to online content as well.

Consequently, this particular paywall may test instead the strength of bundled marketing because Cablevision (NYSE: CVC) owns Newsday as well as Optimum Online, Long Island's leading Internet provider, paidContent observed today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-22 18:31

Publisher Patrick J. Purcell yesterday announced the Boston Herald's intention to erect a paywall to access its online content as early as next year, the Boston Globe reported today. He acknowledged, however, that the success of such a venture rested on a joint effort.

"If the Globe doesn't do it, then it would be hard for us to do it,'' Purcell told the Herald. The Herald's last attempt to charge a fee for online content in 2001 did not meet with success. Twitter comments today discussed the move, with a majority of users stating that paying for The Herald online is largely unfavorable.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-20 21:43

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