Date

Mon - 25.09.2017


paywall

Following the trend of paywalls being put up on news sites around the world, Japan's largest business newspaper, The Nikkei, erected paywalls on its new Web site last week and also imposed a policy restricting links to its articlesand its home page, The New York Times reported.

A detailed application stating reasons for linking to the Web site has to be provided to link to Nikkei's home page. The paper has additionally disabled the right-click feature that usually brings up a menu including ''copy link address.'' The paper's ''link policy'' ends on an ominous note: ''We may seek damages for any violations of these rules.''

The Nikkei says the rules are intended to make sure its pay wall is not breached and to prevent the linking of its content from ''inappropriate'' sites, the author, Hiroko Tabuchi, told The New York Times.

A month's subscription to Nikkei's online edition can cost the reader 4,000 yen, which is less than the cost of a one-month print edition at 4,383 yen, according to The Times. Statistics show that at least one daily newspaper is still delivered for every household in Japan, yet the younger Japanese populace is turning to the Web for news, causing many newspapers to see losses in print subscribers.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-10 00:02

As paywalls go up across the web, most notably those implemented by the Times and Sunday Times last week, one comes tumbling down, reports Press Gazette. Johnston Press, a UK regional publisher with over 300 titles across the country, ended its paywall experiment this week.

In November of 2009, Johnston Press implemented various paid content strategies on four of its English titles and two Scottish titles. Some websites offered "teaser" content that suggested the reader buy the paper version to finish the article, others required user registration, and a few titles erected a paywall, allowing readers 3 months of paid content for £5. Johnston Press' annual report, published earlier this month, gave an optimistic outlook on the ability of JP papers to implement a paywall successfully.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-01 21:49

A new Web site discovered by The Guardian's Digital Content Blog, BreakthePaywall!, has arisen to counter the paywalls that news organisations are investing in to increase their revenue from online news. BreakthePaywall draws some similarities to the previous Web site BugMeNot which allowed non-registered users access to Web sites through a collection shared user names.

Although BreakthePaywall comes from the same philosophy that inspired BugMeNot, the new site is a down-loadable application that modifies a user's Internet browser to essentially "trick" sites with paywalls. Basically, the application works by making the Web browsers of non-paying readers forget that they have already maxed out their limited access to the news through deleting cookies.

For more on this article, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-22 16:11

Nikkei Inc., the Japanese newspaper publisher of Japan's five largest newspapers, has announced it will launch a paid digital edition for its business daily, the Nihon Keizai Shimbun (known as The Nikkei), on March 23.

Access to the publisher's previous newspaper website, Nikkei Net was free of charge. However, after March 23, access to part of the content of the new website will be limited to paid subscribers only, The Asahi Shimbun reports.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-19 04:03

ABC recently announced plans to initiate a paywall for some of its online content starting this June, hoping to alleviate some of its financial troubles and increase revenue. The announcement comes in the wake of ABC's restructuring plans and its decision to eliminate 300 to 400 jobs through buyout propositions.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-17 03:42

The New York Times is still planning to launch its metered paywall early next year, because that model is right for now; but in the future, it may not be, Times Co. Chairman and Publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. said at Bloomberg BusinessWeek's Media Summit 2010, paidContent reported today.

"We believe going to a metered model now is the right thing. But 10 years from now? Who knows?" he said.

Sulzberger also discussed the issue of being in control of subscriber lists when it's time for The Times' digital version to appear on the iPad, Crains New York Business reported. And if Apple CEO Steve Jobs wants control, he's in for a fight.

"Having that direct relationship with our customer is critical," Sulzberger said during a Q&A session at the conference. "We are going to continue to have that, because it's critical to our business success."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-12 00:09

The Trinity Mirror will not implement a broad paywall strategy on its websites, according to Sly Bailey, chief executive of the newspaper group.

Bailey discussed the group's stance on charging for online access to content with MediaGuardian, confirming there are no plans to install a broad paywall. The group favors charging for more specific online services and products instead.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-04 18:04

More details have been released about the MediaNews paywall plans, which will charge for investigations and analysis but not for breaking news, Poynter Online reports.

Vice president for content development Howard Saltz said that investigations, enterprise, analysis, columns and reviews will be behind the paywall. "The kind of content that goes behind a wall is the kind of content that paid, professional journalists do," he told Poynter, "the kinds of things that you really couldn't count on bloggers and Web enthusiasts to do." Articles will be free if it's necessary to remain competitive with other news sources, including breaking news and multimedia, he said.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-12 15:48

French daily newspaper Le Figaro has announced details of its plans to charge for online content, offering three different tiers of subscriptions.

The three levels will be called Connect, Select and Business. Connect is a free subscription that allows access to free email newsletters with general, cultural and financial news. It also enables users to comment on articles and create a personalised front page.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-11 22:04

Building a great system takes time, which is why The New York Times isn't in a hurry to launch its metered paywall this year, President and CEO Janet Robinson said in an earnings call today, paidContent reported.

The new system will "keep us connected to search driven Web" by being flexible between paid and free content, she said.

In the mobile arena, The Times' free iPhone app reached 3 million downloads since it was launched in July 2008, according to MocoNews. In December, it had 75 million mobile pageviews, Robinson said.

It also has paid apps. Its iPhone Crossword app which has a tiered pricing structure: 30 day subscription for US$1.99, six months for $9.99 or a yearly subscription for $16.99. The newspaper's BlackBerry Sudoku app and Crossword app both cost $2.99.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-11 00:25

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