Date

Mon - 25.09.2017


paywall

Arthur Sulzberger, chairman of the New York Times, has recently claimed that social sharing will be permitted despite the forthcoming paywall meter on The New York Times website, according to paidContent. The NYT's paywall, set to be inaugurated next January, has been the cause of widespread concerns for the future of the news giant. Yet, Sulzberger hoped to put some of those concerns to rest as he claimed that article sharing on Facebook and other social networking sites would probably remain free.

Sulzberger also commented on the degree of the paywall's impermeability. John Battelle of Federated Media suggested that consumers could simply clear the cookies from their Internet browser once they have used up their number of clicks and start all over, thus avoiding the paywall restrictions. Sulzberger responded by saying "There has always been and be always be ways to get around not paying for a newspaper. You could steal a newspaper from the stand today, if you really wanted to."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-08 22:47

The Irish News has turned its paywall technology into a revenue generating opportunity by selling it to other news publishers, Journalism.co.uk reported yesterday.

The page-turning service was developed in-house, and the Belfast-based regional title is offering to sell other publishers a subscription and digital edition service as product packages. Starting at £465, the service includes server resources, bandwidth and video streaming for digital editions.
"When the paper was available for free, apart from the cost of running the website, we were losing readers of the paid for paper to the free online model, which was economic madness. Now readers have a clear and equitable choice, pay for a printed newspaper or pay for the same paper online," Liam McMullen, systems and resource manager, told Journalism.co.uk. He also noted that creating their own in-house paywall technology has helped the group to have greater control over the product and offer more a customised personal service to its readers.

The service has so far been well received by its readers and the newspaper has no plans to bring down its paywall and re-introduce free content, McMullen told Journalism.co.uk. He added that the newspaper isn't stopping there with its technology, and will continue to try and serve advertisers better by targeting advertising around news on its Web site, and optimising potentials of the mobile medium.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-27 23:42

In an interview yesterday with AllThingsDigital's Peter Kafka, New York Times spokeswoman Stacy Green attempted to allay concerns over the impact the NYT's forthcoming paywall on bloggers. A new study on news and social media from the Project for Excellence in Journalism shows that 80% of blog entries link to one of just four news sources: the BBC, CNN, The Washington Post and The New York Times. Thus if the NYT's proposed paywall shuts out bloggers, the newspaper stands to lose an enormous portion of its Web traffic.

In downplaying fears over a fundamental shift to a 'closed web', the NYT spokeswoman reiterated an explanation of the 'metered model' underlying the NYT paywall. In essence, users will be able to read a number of articles free of charge, and only after exceeding their quota will they be prompted to pay for content. Furthermore, surfers who arrive at a given article from a blog link will not have that session counted against them.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-26 19:09

Tim Gentry, the Guardian's head of optimisation and effectiveness, said in a presentation at the Omniture Summit EMEA 2010 that the publisher would not implement online registration, as it "could push away a lot of our audience," Media Week reported.

This statement comes as the paper reported that DMGT, the Daily Mail's parent company, has said it will not follow The Times' paywall strategy and instead remain a largely free site.

Gentry said The Guardian draws about 33 million monthly unique visitors. It uses Omniture's website measurement tool SiteCatalyst as well as Audience Science's 'Discovery' technology, which enables them to create more interesting audience segments for advertisers, Brand Republic reported.

He also mentioned that the forthcoming EU directive covering online privacy was "a challenge" for publishers. "How we do behavioural targeting within [this] new legal framework will be interesting. We remain an opt-out organisation, rather than opt-in," he added.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-21 22:30

By now, it has become increasingly clear that 2010 is in fact, as the British weekly Economist put it, the year of the paywall. The Times of London and the Sunday Times are just weeks away from offering their online content for a fee. Recently, The New York Times announced its finalized paywall plans and an official launch date.

This has prompted Vanity Fair.com's and Newser's, Michael Wolff, to wonder what will happen to the news world when most people no longer get their sources from established sources.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-21 17:07

Unlike Murdoch, Guardian's editor-in-chief, Alan Rusbridger, has ruled out the idea of erecting a paywall around the newspaper's Web site. Since paid online content is not going to be a source of revenue anytime soon, Guardian News & Media is launching two new strategies to complement the paper's revenue stream, according to paidContent.

First up, Guardian will be launching a membership club scheme it announced last year, one that will resemble the Times+ initiative.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-20 22:47

paidContent has published some 'sneak peaks' of the Times' new website, to be launched in June. TheTimes.co.uk and SundayTimes.co.uk will replace Timesonline.co.uk and will be behind a paywall.

As paidContent noted, the new site looks more similar to the print edition than its predecessor did in terms of layout and its use of the print masthead. The lead story has a good deal of space on the home page. Another change is the introduction of an 'OpEd Live' section which allows readers to chat with the paper's columnists and opinion writers. PaidContent reported that readers will also be able to use TheTimes.co.uk to chat with other personalities via CoverItLive, though this is something that Times Online already does, in fact.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-19 19:39

January 2011 will be the end of the free NYTimes.com.

Executive editor Bill Keller revealed the news yesterday evening at a dinner event for the Foreign Press Association, but he did not give any other information, such as pricing or paywall model The Times will use, Fast Company reported today.

The Times will only charge for access to selected stories, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal.

In the past, chairman Arthur Sulzberger Jr. has said those who don't pay will only be able to read a certain number of stories per month, according to the National Business Review of New Zealand.

Allowing users to read a certain number of articles before they are prompted to pay in order to read more is a "metered" paywall, such as the one the Financial Times uses. The Wall Street Journal, on the other hand, provides a mix of stories each day - some paid, some that can be read for free.

The Times has about 20 million unique users, the NBR noted.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-15 00:16

It seems News International is making good on its promise to remove its newspapers from search indexes and news aggregators. Yesterday, Rupert Murdoch's The Sun Online blocked Meltwater, an online media monitoring company that notifies companies when they have been mentioned in newspapers, according to paidContent.

This move comes as the Wapping-based publications prepare to erect paywalls around their Web sites. Back in March, the Times Online also blocked Meltwater in response to the company refusing to compensate the newspaper for aggregating its content. Once again, the Murdoch-owned newspaper used the robots.txt protocol, software that prevents web crawlers from accessing a website, to block Meltwater.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-14 20:38

A Boston area publication, The Telegram & Gazette, recently announced it will begin implementing a "metered model" paywall over the summer. Jacqueline Reis from the Telegram and Gazette staff announced on the Web site that the new model will not charge print subscribers for access to online content.

The new model will still give readers free access to the majority of content offered on the site, with the exception of the content produced by the Telegram and Gazette's staff. The newspaper's publisher, Bruce Gaultney described the new method as a way to "recognise the value of local news" that would "bring new revenue to support news operations."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-27 20:18

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