Date

Mon - 20.11.2017


paywall

Combined traffic to The Times and The Sunday Times websites has fallen to 1.61 million visits in July, from 2.22 million in June and 2.79 million in May, according to comScore's latest findings, Media Week reported yesterday.

News International, which owns the newspapers, was expecting its readership to decline dramatically as it began charging for online content in July, New Media Age reminded.
However, comScore numbers revealed "a better performance than many predicted," The Independent explained, as media experts had forecast losses of more than 84 percent.

According to the study, readers are spending an average of four minutes per visit in the websites down from the 7.6 minutes in May. Page views have also decreased from 29 million in May to 9 million in July.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-17 23:56

The New York Times Co. is testing out its paywall strategy, but not on its flagship newspaper's website. Rather, the company has set up a metered paywall on the website of its Worcester, Massachusetts newspaper, the Telegram & Gazette, The Times announced yesterday.

Beginning today, the daily will allow readers to view 10 local news articles each month for free. After that threshold has been reached, they will be offered several different online subscription options, from a US$14.95 monthly pass, to a $1 day pass.

Flagship newspaper The Times will launch its own metered paywall early in 2011; however, it "has not yet set a pricing schedule or said how many articles it will allow online readers to view before they are charged," the article stated.

For a previous article on this topic, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-16 18:32

"Tablets are a perfect platform for cheap, convenient and up-to-date News Corp content," Rupert Murdoch said at a media debate in Sydney Tuesday, Media Guardian reported.

"News Corp has "tens of thousands of readers" through apps for the Wall Street Journal, the Times and the Australian," Murdoch added. He then pointed out that Apple's iPad sales will exceed than predicted.

Murdoch said he think iPads will sell around 15 million this calendar year and more than 40 million by 2012. And is just one of many tablet or slate computers in the pipeline. News Corp fully intends to be across all those platforms too."

In addition, he claimed that subscriber levels for the new Times and Sunday Times online paywalls are strong and described the strategy as "the start of a new business model for the internet," but did not give any exact figures, Media Guardian reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-03 21:20

As The Times continues to lose online traffic after introducing a paywall in recent weeks, a KPMG survey published today revealed that British consumers are less likely to pay for online content than other web users around the world, Marketing Week reported.

The study found that 81 percent of UK users would rather go elsewhere for content if a free site they regularly visited started charging for content. Only 19 percent said to be willing to pay.

"UK consumers still haven't come around to the idea of paying for digital content and are clear that they will move to other sites if pay walls are put up," KPMG's head of technology Tudor Aw said, The Daily Telegraph quoted.

However, 74 percent of British users would be willing to receive ads on their computers in exchange for free content.

"This continues a trend we have seen in previous years and again acts as a pointer as to whether a pay or ad-funded model will eventually succeed," Aw said.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-26 18:20

Following reports over the weekend that the Times had lost 66 percent of its online traffic since introducing compulsory registration and a paywall in recent weeks, MediaGuardian has now reported that the Times lost almost 90% of its online readership compared to February. This is the figure that was previously predicted by Sunday Times editor John Witherow, and is, according to the Guardian, "the standard experience when a site moves to a paid-access model instead of free access."

The Guardian's calculations are based on data from Experian Hitwise (as was the 66% figure) that shows how many people have attempted to access the site and how many people register to reach the home page. Taking into account figures provided by Dan Sabbagh, Beehive City blogger and former Times media correspondent, MediaGuardian concludes that the total number of daily visitors to the Times' site has fallen by about 84 percent since May.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-20 18:46

Setting up a paywall online is not a news, but The Sun Chronicle, a U.S.-based newspaper in Massachusetts, announced it will begin charge readers for commenting on its online stories, WBUR reported.

The paper will charge a one-time fee of 99 cents to post comments online. However, users need to pay by credit card, and the real name on the card will show up on comments, which is, no more anonymity, MediaGuardian reported.

Upon posting, the user must acknowledge that he/she will abide by U.S. state and federal law, and agree to be responsible for his/her comments.

"This is not about the revenue," according to publisher Oreste D'Arconte. He added that the new policy is to "eliminate past excesses that included blatant disregard for our appropriateness guidelines, blind accusations and unsubstantiated allegations," Editor and Publishers reported.

Those who violate the paper's guidelines will be banned from the site.

The Foxboro Reporter and the Silver City Bulletin in Taunton will also follow the new policy, E&P reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-14 21:07

Time Magazine has not put up a paywall, nor has it started asking visitors to register in order to view content. It is, however, not allowing users to see all of its content.

Time.com is now giving online readers "abridged" versions of its magazine stories, each accompanied by a message stating that the full text is only available through print and iPad editions. Or, as paidContent's Staci Kramer quips: "What the Time Inc. flagship did was slip on the magazine equivalent of a condom, a barrier between online readers and the full content of the magazine."

All week, Time has been removing content from its current issue from the website, but this next step in trying to get readers to pay for content is still an experiment, as was the magazine's first paywall, which was later removed. The current effort aims to show readers the difference between what it gives away, and what it charges them to read.

Journalistically speaking, the stories are "deconstructed for online promotion instead of reading," and also strange in that they are used to send readers to Web exclusives meant to accompany the magazine story, which online readers can't even read fully, and online readers are a majority of readers. Business-wise, the audience being asked to pay for content is now just limited to iPad owners or people who want a print copy, which is also a strange move, Kramer points out.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-08 22:10

Three U.S. newspapers are set to introduce paywalls to their websites later this week, reports journalism.co.uk. The newspapers, The Tallahassee Democrat in Florida, the Spectrum in Utah, and Greenville News in South Carolina, will introduce a range of subscription packages on July 1. Gannett owns all three of the newspapers and the paywalls are reportedly part of the company's subscription trials.

On the Greenville News site, publisher Steven R. Brandt and executive editor John S. Pittman explain "content, regardless of the platform, was never 'free.' This new model will require Web users to pay for online content, either by selecting one of the subscription offers above, or purchasing a day pass to the GreenvilleOnline.com website. The difference is that now everyone will be paying for it, not just those who bought the print edition."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-30 19:49

TheTimes.co.uk and SundayTimes.co.uk went behind a paywall this week, and in hopes of attracting paying online readers, the News Corp-owned titles are offering prizes of free tickets to Toy Story 3 or a weekend getaway to the Grosvenor Hotel in Dorset, Bloomberg reports.

The Times' strategy is an "all or nothing" approach, meaning all content will be behind a paywall, and Times and Sunday Times content will disappear almost completely from search results, such as Google News. The price will be £1 a day or £2 a week.

"We don't expect or require that all the people who do now will still look at it," Daniel Finkelstein, executive editor of the Times in London, told Bloomberg, in an article posted by the Sydney Morning Herald. "What's left is still a vast market."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-18 00:33

The Financial Times has begun moving its blogs behind a paywall, starting with its popular "Money Supply" blog on Wednesday, according to a blog posted on Reuters.com.

Money Supply will be adhering to the financial news site's subscription rules and will fall in line with the majority of FT's content. The blog entries are published on a blog platform with a separate URL, rather than the main newspaper publishing platform which leaves very little scope for the entries to appear in the newspaper search results and eventually little chances of being noticed by its online subscribers as well.
This move by the newspaper makes sense "in a kind of tyranny-of-consistency way," Felix Salmon wrote in his Reuters.com blog. "Blogs are a great way for a newspaper to add online value for their print subscribers: they can put nichey content like wonky posts on central banking online, without using up precious newsprint. But the FT doesn't give online access to its print subscribers: that's a key difference between the FT paywall and the one being proposed by the NYT. And print subscribers understandably don't particularly want to pay twice for the same content. So their relationship with the FT will necessarily weaken when they lose access to the blog content."

Now that Money Supply is behind a paywall, there is little to no chance its audience will grow, which means it will keep dropping down the FT's list of priorities, he stated.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-11 21:58

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