Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


paywall

Today the Los Angeles Times goes live with its new "membership program". With a model similar to the New York Times metered paywall, the LA Times will give its readers 15 free stories a month, after which it will ask users to pay 99 cents for the first four weeks of digital access.

While this seems like a scheme to monetize digital, it focuses heavily on getting readers to continue with print. For one thing, digital access is free to print subscribers. Secondly, and more unusually, when the initial 99 cent rate expires, the LA Times will charge $1.99 a week for a package which includes digital access and its printed Sunday newspaper, or $3.99 a week for digital access only.

The LA Times is straight-forward about the reason that it is paying digital subscribers to accept the Sunday printed paper: "The Sunday edition of The Times has the most advertising and readership, making that the company's most profitable publication day," writes Jerry Hirsch in the paper's business section.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-05 18:17

As Gannett announced last week that it is launching paywalls around its 80 American publications (with the exception of USA Today), it feels like consumers may be getting used to the idea of being charged for some sorts of content.

But while paywalls have been tried and tested on mainstream news publications, could they ever work in the blogosphere? We're about to find out, as Australian-based fashion blog Frockwriter has announced that it will become the first blog to charge its readers for content through the Press+ revenue platform.

Frockwriter is about to collaborate with Press+ to launch a metered paywall, which will allow readers to view eight free posts per month, before charging them US$1.99 for a monthly subscription or US$19.99 for a yearly one.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-29 17:55

In Slovakia two new publishers have joined Piano Media's national paywall. One publisher that already collaborates with Piano has also agreed to put Slovakia's largest regional publication behind the wall. This mean that, in total, 12 Slovakian publishers and over 50 websites are now taking part in Piano's Slovakian single-payment system.

The publisher Petit Press, which already works with Piano, is adding Korzar, a daily paper covering Eastern Slovakia, to Piano's paywall. Piano's Chief Executive Tomáš Bella is quoted in the official press release about the expansion, saying: "we couldn't be happier that Petit Press agreed to include Korzar's daily paper into our offer. They have really great coverage of eastern Slovakia and that fills a big need for our readers who don't live in Bratislava."

Publisher The Rock is adding the English-language weekly the Slovak Spectator to the paywall. Paying users will gain access to the latest PDF edition of the paper and to the Slovak Spectator's archives.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-06 17:39

When News International properties The Times and The Sunday Times of London put up hard paywalls in July 2010 it seemed like their digital strategy had been decided in favour of paying users and against sharing on the web. But now an interview with News International's digital product director Nick Bell, which appeared in Paid Content earlier this week, suggests that The Times is considering making its paywall ever-so-slightly leakier by allowing subscribers to share articles with their direct friends.

Bell is quoted in the article saying that sharing has been "a hotly-debated topic" at the Times headquarters.

He promises that, "over the next six months, you will see us rewarding our paying subscribers with the ability to share amongst their network.... If they want to share content with their direct friends, then we're going to enable that."

However, the author of the Paid Content article, Robert Andrews, stresses that this is not a guarantee that Times content will be free for friends of subscribers. Bell is clear that The Times is not about to switch to a metered paywall like that of the New York Times, but is only interested in giving ""more value to our paying customers."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-20 15:10

A piece of music sounds normally sounds better when all the parts are played together. And Slovakian start-up Piano Media argues that, when it comes to paywalls, news publications are also better off when their strategies work in harmony.

Piano Media, founded in May 2011 by Tomáš Bella, former editor-in-chief of SME Online, the digital division of Slovakia's largest newspaper, has persuaded most of Slovakia's major media outlets to sign up to a single-payment system. This means that the country's major news sites share a paywall, and split the revenue between themselves - 40% goes to the news site where the reader bought his or her Piano subscription, 30% goes to the site where a reader is spending his or her time online and 30% goes to Piano Media itself. Its system makes the users' experiences easier by offering a simple pay plan and by reducing the feeling that readers are paying one company for content that they could get for free elsewhere.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-10 10:56

Physical construction may be down across the Western World, but there's a boom in paywalls.

At least 150 paywalls have been erected over the last year or so, in the U.S., U.K., and across Europe. American companies in on that construction boom include Lee, McClatchy, Morris, MediaGeneral, MediaNews, Gatehouse, and Tribune (all powered by Press+), as well as Scripps, Gannett, and Belo. From Sanoma in Finland to The Telegraph in the U.K., a number of dailies are following the trend. Those that haven't are almost all considering a paywall in some form; many more will launch in the next 12 months.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-27 09:40

by Dean Roper

"When we decided to put our content behind the wall, our newsroom was horrified," says Dirk Nolde, managing editor of the Berliner Morgenpost, during Saturday's World Editors Forum session on paywalls.

"Fortunately," he says, "our readers are indeed willing to pay, and we think it is because they believe there is quality content and it is OK to pay for that."

Continue reading on the 18th World Editors Forum Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-21 09:39

by Alexandra Waldhorn

When the New York Times first erected a paywall - as a possible cure for slipping profits - Assistant Managing Editor Jim Roberts says he was wary.

"I was one of the few in the newsroom who thought it was a bad idea. I was really worried that our audience, which we had worked so hard to attract, would shrink," Roberts says during the World Editors Forum session, "Paywalls, from the newsroom perspective."

He was especially concerned that the younger audience, often attracted through social media, would flee. Advertising would follow suit, he thought - if the readership shrunk, so would advertising.

Continue reading on the 18th World Editors Forum Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-21 09:28

For many newspaper bosses, the introduction of an online paywall is intimidating. "How," they wonder, "will we convince readers to pay for content they currently enjoy for free?" But for Alan English, executive editor of the Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle, explaining his paper's recent decision to charge for some digital material isn't scary at all.

"It's an easy conversation with the reader," English said. "'Would you buy your favorite reporter a cup of coffee for all the work they do for you in a month?'"

Continue reading on NetNewsCheck

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-06-21 13:54

In parts of Europe, online news sites are adopting measures to discourage readers from commenting because there are just too many posts for editorial staff to monitor.

Guest blogger Tomáš Bella reports on the problem and solutions like his own start-up business, Piano, which bundles media groups together behind a single paywall, allowing users to pay and log in once for access to many sites.

Continue reading on the BBC College of Journalism blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-11 10:54

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