Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


paying for content

For years now, the line between the software business and the media business has been blurring. Software applications used to take the form of packaged goods, sold through retail outlets at set prices. Today, as a result of cloud computing and other advances, applications look more and more like media products. They're ad-supported, subscribed to, continually updated, and the content they incorporate is often as important as the functions they provide. As traditional media companies have moved to distribute their wares in digital form -- as code, in other words -- they've come to resemble software companies. They provide not only original content, but an array of online tools and functions that allow customers to view, manipulate, and add to the content in myriad ways.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-20 17:44

by Jeff Jarvis

As I ponder the future of The New York Times, it occurred to me that its pay meter could be exactly reversed. I'll also tell you why this wouldn't work in a minute. But in any case, this is a way to illustrate how how media are valuing our readers/users/customers opposite how we should, rewarding the freeriders and taxing -- and perhaps turning away -- the valuable users.

So try this on for size: Imagine that you pay to get access to The Times. Everyone does. You pay for one article.

Continue reading on BuzzMachine

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-20 17:40

Are you pricing your content intelligently? Or is your pricing model lacking a scientific approach? Jimmy Gasteen is the CEO and founder of Precursive, a new media business consultancy and workflow tools firm, and previously a pricing analyst at Reed Elsevier.

He thinks a lot of media businesses have got it wrong when it comes to price and that a little analytical thinking will go a long way for both B2B and consumer media products.

Source: TheMediaBriefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-30 09:19

by Sean Carton

Why can't newspapers seem to make any money online?

That's the question I asked myself the other day as I ran smack up against The Baltimore Sun's paywall after having reached my 15 page per month (free) limit. I'm not a big reader of the Sun, but I was curious about what people were saying about Gordon Ramsay's "Kitchen Nightmares" visit to one of our local eateries. I clicked a link on Facebook that was supposed to lead me to a post on the Sun's food blog when I smacked right into the wall.

Continue reading on ClickZ

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-29 09:57

Helsingin Sanomat, the leading national daily in Finland, decided back in 2006 to offer a "Combo" subscription to print and all digital versions of the paper.

Five years later (with an iPad version now in play too) Helsingin Sanomat has 120,000 subscribers to the combo, a third of its subscription base. Now, 80 percent of new subscription sales are for that package.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-23 09:50

by Paul Carr

It's hard to imagine anything more perfect than Slate's decision to lay off its respected media critic Jack Shafer. Not perfect in a good way -- I count myself amongst Shafer's legions of fans -- but perfect in the way that Alanis Morissette not understanding the meaning of 'Ironic' is perfect, or the way that a safety inspector falling out of a tenth story window would be perfect.

"I tolllldddd yyoooouuu sooooooo..."

Continue reading on TechCrunch

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-08-30 10:40

by George Brock

The Times reaches 100,000 digital subscribers and I'm still baffled by their online strategy. I ought to be better-placed than many to figure out what they're up to (declaration: I used to work there). But it's not easy.

Continue reading on georgebrock.net

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-05 09:47

The New York Post hasn't made any real money in years. That's why it's an unlikely frontrunner in the publishing industry's uneasy turf war with Apple and the IPad. And even though it comes from a company that is spending tens of millions to invent a new news product for the IPad (News Corp's "The Daily"), the Post has fired the loudest and most effective shots for the newspaper industry directly at Apple's broadside.

Continue reading on C-Scape

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-04 10:00

An insight into the work behind the scenes on The Telegraph's iPad app - moving from a free/insight gathering stage to paid.

Taken from Tim Rowell, Telegraph Director of Mobile Product Development's presentation, at the Media Briefing's Mobile Strategies event.

Continue reading on Association of Online Publishers

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-04 09:33

A Los Angeles-based company is attempting to accomplish what online publishers have been chasing for the past 15 years -- namely, placing value on a piece of content.

JumpTime, founded by a group of former executives from the likes of MTV Networks and Yahoo, this month is taking the wraps off a software service that affixes a price tag to articles in real time. It also helps determine the future value of those articles.

Continue reading on MediaFile

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-06-29 09:35

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation