Date

Thu - 23.11.2017


Paid Content

Kankakee, Illinois' Daily Journal is now charging for its online content, The Associated Press reported Tuesday.

The online edition of the Journal is offered in a PDF format to subscribers of its print edition. While visitors can see the first few paragraphs of a story for free, they must pay to read articles in their entirety.

The Journal's managing editor, Susy Shultz, said the online edition also incorporated interactive elements, such as blogs and videos, the AP reported in an article posted by the Chicago Tribune.

Print subscription prices are set at US$181 per year, whereas the new online subscriptions will cost readers $155 a year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-20 09:03

The U.S.-based company Kachingke is proposing a "half-way house" solution to generating income from online content AllMediaScotland reported.

Amidst a mounting debate over whether online content should be paid for, Kachingle is offering a way for sites to make up for insufficient ad revenue by inviting users to pay a minimal monthly subscription to sites bearing the Kachingle logo. In turn, sites displaying the company's logo are compensated by Kachingle on a monthly basis, according to the number off subscribing users that visit their site.

Sites posting the logo are eligible for remuneration only if subscribing users click on Kachingle's "medallion" logo, as a way of verifying that the content is worthy of financial compensation, according to AllMediaScotland.

The launch of the programme has been delayed following a overwhelming response and interest on the part of newspaper publishers. Cynthis Typaldos, the founder of Kachingle, explained the company "needed to make sure our initial system could scale to hundreds of thousands of active users" before launching, AllMediaScotland reported.

Typaldos said "hundreds of content sites have 'applied' to be part of the launch." Interested parties include outlets such as cable TV, public broadcasting, newspapers and blogs.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-15 10:20

The Australian newspaper bucked the global trend of advertising decline caused by the global recession, as it turned in an increase in display advertising and will look to begin charging for bundled online content soon, according to Editor-in-Chief Chris Mitchell, the newspaper reported on its Web site Thursday.

Mitchell said the newspaper aims to begin charging for online content within the next 12 to 18 months, and has stood strong despite the economic climate and the industry wide advertising decline, reporting that the paper had seen increases in advertising dollars especially in the business section.
Rupert Murdoch, chairman and chief executive officer of The Australian's parent company New Corporation, said the company was exploring different models of online subscription.

Mitchell described the future online service as a bundle package of information, amalgamating content from a number of services which would include sister publications the Dow Jones and The Wall Street Journal, as well as other international publications.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-08 08:01

Manchester, Connecticut's daily newspaper, the Journal Inquirer, is set to begin charging for online content as well as major major Web site expansion, The Hartford Courant reported. The newspaper will charge US$154 a year to view most stories, and print subscribers will have free access. The Web site will also see new features including reader blogs.

"Advertising on the Internet site has not yet begun to pay anything close to the expense of providing the news to our readers, even as providing the news on the Internet for free threatens to erode the paid circulation that does support the paper," Elizabeth S. Ellis, the newspaper's publisher, told The Courant.
Richard F. Hanley, graduate director of journalism and interactive communication at nearby Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Connecticut, said the challenge in charging for online content is to make that content valuable enough to attract paying consumers.

"Even then, it may not work," Hanley told The Courant. "The JI is following this spasm in the news business to fight back against free."

The Wall Street Journal is the only other major newspaper in the United States to offer successful paid for online services.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-16 09:50

Hearst Corp., a New York-based print media group, is set to begin charging for some of its newspapers' online content. In a staff memo, President of Newspapers Steven Swartz also outlined further novel approaches to income generation including the development and introduction of an e-reader, the Wall Street Journal reported.

The company has not decided how much content will remain free and how much will go behind a paid wall. "Exactly how much paid content to hold back from our free sites will be a judgment call made daily by our management, whose mission should be to run the best free Web sites in our markets without compromising our ability to get a fair price from consumers for the expensive, unique reporting and writing that we produce each day," Swartz stated in a memo to staff.

Hearst, which publishes of 16 U.S. newspapers, recently announced it will sell both the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and the San Francisco Chronicle due to dwindling advertising income and subscriptions. Without buyers, Hearst has announced would have to close both papers.

The possibility of digital subscription revenue is a product of Hearst's plan, "100 Days," which aims to create new revenue strategies.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-02 23:40

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