Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


Paid Content

Nearly half of North American editors surveyed doubt that requiring payment for online content is the answer to the news media's current fiscal crisis, Spanish blogger Juan Varela reported Wednesday at soitu.es. Varela's article summarises findings announced this week at the Newsmedia Economic Action Plan Conference held in Reston, Virginia, United States.

The study, conducted by the American Press Institute in cooperation with Belden Interactive, reiterates that dailies are too distant from readers as well as being too paper-reliant. API does not envision "paid content as the one source that will save journalism."

Rather, it urges a five-point plan developed at this year's Newspaper Association of America conference held in January. The five points involve "doctrines" respecting true value, fair use, fair share, digital development and consumer-centric practices.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-17 19:03

Google has proposed a system of micropayments to access news content that it hopes to put in place during the next year, The New York Times reported Thursday.

The proposal was part of a submission to the Newspaper Association of America, which had made a request from a number of technology companies for paid content models.
The micropayment system, posted by Nieman Journalism Online, will act as extension of the online payment system, Google Checkout, launched in 2006 to compete with eBay's PayPal system.

"While currently in the early planning stages, micropayments will be a payment vehicle available to both Google and non-Google properties within the next year," Google stated. "The idea is to allow viable payments of a penny to several dollars by aggregating purchases across merchants and over time."

The document said the Checkout application would be available for newspapers to charge for subscriptions but at this stage is "fairly rudimentary."

The search engine giant said paid content revenue could also allow Google to rely less on advertising revenue.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-10 19:38

On Thursday APN News & Media Ltd. Chief Executive Brendan Hopkins called for newspapers to charge for online use of their content, the Sydney Morning Herald reported Thursday.

The head of Australia's largest regional newspaper publisher singled out the use of the papers' product by search engines such as Google and Yahoo as a place to find profit.
Hopkins said the key to transitioning to a pay-per-view model is high quality, unique journalism that consumers are willing to pay for.

"As an industry we must strive to protect our content from those who contribute nothing to its creation and are happy to run on its coat tails," Hopkins t.

He also specifically accused search engines of devaluing the content offered by newspapers' Web sites, telling the Pacific Area Newspaper Publishers' Association (PANPA) conference in Sydney that newspapers' relationships with search engines should be more like the relationship the music industry has with them. Hopkins used the recent agreement between Google and the music industry's Performing Rights Society as an example of successful online use of copyright content, which will see the Google-owned YouTube pay for the use of music videos.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-10 19:35

On Tuesday the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette launched its new members only, paid content website, PG+. The new Website will offer subscribers unique access to exclusive content as well as interactive participation unavailable on the standard online version of the Post-Gazette.

PG+ will allow subscribers access to constantly updated blog, video, chat and behind the scenes content from a team of staff featuring some of the newspaper's most popular members including Ed Bouchette, Mackenzie Carpenter, Doug Oster, Reg Henry, Jack Kelly and Gene Collier.

"PG+ is a natural extension of our news, entertainment and information resources that the region has come to depend on," said Post-Gazette President Christopher H. Chamberlain.

The site focuses on user interaction and debate through a subscriber profile that will encourage ongoing discussion.

Longtime Post-Gazette editor/producer Katy Buchanan is the site's editorial coordinator.

Subscription to the site begins at $3.99 a month, with an annual fee of $36.

PG+ will not see existing content put behind a paid wall, instead the Website will hope to attract subscribers through the generation of completely new content, exclusive to the site.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-01 21:30

Media conglomerate News Corporation has recently been in talks with publishers about forming a news consortium to better enable the group to charge for news on both online and mobile devices, the Los Angeles Times reported Friday.

Thanks to its success with its partly paid, partly ad supported Wall Street Journal Online, News Corp. is "a logical leader" to expand that model elsewhere, according to the Times. Chief Digital Officer Jonathan Miller is "believed to have met" with publishers from Hearst Corp., the Washington Post Co., the New York Times Co. and Tribune Co., according to the Times, a Tribune-owned paper.

Earlier this month, News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch announced all the media giant's news Web sites will begin charging for digital content by the summer of 2010.

The All Things Digital blog, part of the Wall Street Journal Digital Network, owned by News Corp., pointed out that the biggest problem publishers face when switching to paid content is that "a great deal of the stuff we make can be found all over the Web, with little to distinguish it, and the model that used to support this content-near-monopolies on eyeballs and ad dollars-has disappeared. Pay wall or no, that's going to have change going forward."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-25 15:55

Freedom Communications, which publishes more than 100 U.S. newspapers, will charge non-subscribers for access to online content, StlToday.com reported.

Publisher Tyler Patton said the move towards paid content "will allow greater value to our many loyal print-edition subscribers by not giving away the news to non-subscribers." The changes will be effective Wednesday, with subscribers having free access and weekend subscribers paying US$3.56 per month for access to online content. Full access to online-only content will cost $3.95 a month, while daily subscriptions are priced at 75 cents.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-14 15:59

The Valley Morning Star, a daily newspaper in southern Texas, has announced it begin charging for online content, The Associated Press reported Tuesday.

Revealed on the newspaper's Web site Monday, it was announced that non-subscribers and weekend subscribers will have to pay 75 cents per day to access online content. Full subscribers to the print edition will continue to receive free access to the Web site.

Non-subscribers will also be able to purchase monthly access to the newspaper.

The Star, owned by Freedom Communications, will be the first of the publisher's papers to begin charging for online content. However, the Star's publisher Tyler Patton said it would not be the last.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-14 15:30

Much buzz has been made regarding the possibility of microblogging site Twitter eventually making a profit, but several industry professionals seem to think the outlook is bleak for the popular site.

"The microblogging site may never be able to turn a profit," Brennon Slattery wrote on his PC World blog, where he reported that at a Sun Valley, Idaho media conference hosted by Allen & Co., the hot topic was whether Twitter could generate earnings from its content. Participants in the conference seemed to believe a subscription model was the only viable source of revenue for the site.

The Associated Press, also reporting on the conference, described a panel discussion addressing the issues that could affect Twitter's profitability in which participants seemed wary of the site developing a successful business model.

"I think it's a great service. I just don't think it's a natural advertising medium," commented media executive Barry Diller.

The creators of Twitter, Evan Williams and Biz Stone, are reportedly working on a business model they have yet to unveil. The AP reported on what the model might entail, saying Williams and Stone "have suggested they might impose fees on companies interested in mining the data about consumer preferences and peeves that pour into Twitter."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-13 15:48

The Newport Daily News is experimenting with a previously untested approach to charging for online content - the cost of an Internet only subscription will be more than the subscription to the newspaper's print version, the Nieman Journalism Lab reported Monday.

The newspaper plans to plug the paper-and-ink format by making it more financially attractive than the online equivalent, while bringing in cash from those who are forced to use the online version. The Rhodes Island 12,000-strong circulation paper is published in a traditional afternoon edition on weekdays and a morning edition on Saturdays.

"Our goal was to get people back into the printed product," publisher Albert K. Sherman, Jr. told Niemen's Edward J. Delaney in an interview. "Why would they pay for it on the Internet when they can go buy the printed paper? And that's perfect - that's what we want."

The new "three-tier pricing structure" charges subscribers US$145 a year for home delivery of the print version, $245 for home print delivery and online access, and a steep $345 for the online access to the duplicate of the print edition only. However, some information, such as obituaries and wedding announcements, will remain free.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-09 17:15

KOS Media, an independent and free Kent newspaper group, plans to start charging for certain copies of its paper, Kent on Sunday, Press Gazette reported.

The "part-paid part-free initiative"" will put a price on some of the 100,000 issues of Kent on Sunday that were once free for readers to take in newsstands and supermarkets.

Starting Saturday, KOS Media will print 150,000 copies of their papers, selling approximately 50,000 for 90p each.

Avid readers of the papers are encouraged to subscribe for paid home delivery to ensure they receive a copy.

Paul Stannard, KOS Media's managing director, commented on the high demand for the papers saying, "the copies used to run out very quickly. Newsagents have never stopped knocking on our doors saying: 'We think you should sell this paper'."

Stannard explained that the group's aim is to cover costs of the free editions by charging for some editions. The number of free copies distributed is intended to remain the same.

In 2004, Kent on Sunday was the first free paper to win newspaper of the year at the Regional Press Awards.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-27 09:16

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