Date

Fri - 17.11.2017


Paid Content

News Corp. titan Rupert Murdoch has taken a more aggressive stance against online news aggregators in the wake of his delayed paywall plans for The Wall Street Journal, SkyNews today reported.

Following publishing division losses reported in July, Murdoch had announced plans to monetize all his online content, Marketing Vox reported in August. However, that dream never materialised due to the many workarounds available in the cyberworld, as described by blogger Mathew Ingram in June 2008.

Now, Murdoch, who once said it didn't matter that his material was available through Google, is starting to sound more and more like The Associated Press, who has taken on a battle royale against the search engine giant, as reported by Newsweek in October.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-09 18:54

Bloomberg LP may charge up to US$1,000 per year for access to some news on its Web site, the Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday. Although Bloomberg would not confirm WSJ's report - the two are financial news rivals - it did say it is "in the process of evaluating various approaches," according to paidContent.

Bloomberg.com is currently free, and the site's users already do not have access to all the financial data professional users pay for, either through subscriptions or through Bloomberg's special terminals, common in newsrooms and financial firms.

Kevin Krim, head of Bloomberg's online consumer media division, is reported to have said some users could be charged between $600 and $1,000 for some content they currently can access on the site for free, paidContent reported.

Bloomberg last month bought BusinessWeek magazine, which also has plans to charge for online content and ramp up its print edition, according to MediaWeek.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-05 21:08

The New York Times may soon begin to charge for online content. "We're within weeks of a decision," Executive Editor Bill Keller said Saturday.

The newspaper's management expected to make a decision by late summer, but are still weighing the complicated issue. Although charging for some online content would bring in subscription revenues, that potential revenue could cut into the millions in advertising dollars, as online advertisers want to reach the largest amount of readers as possible, Clark Hoyt reported.

"It's a much tougher, more complicated decision than it seems to all the armchair experts. There is no clear consensus on the right way to go," Keller said, according to The Times.

Payment options include charging for premium content, introducing subscription elements, micropayments or perhaps forming a consortium with other newspaper groups, Brand Republic reported today. "The difficulty in reaching a decision will likely have ramifications for the rest of the newspaper industry, which is looking to the New York Times as an indication for what it might try," the article stated.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-02 21:58

The Wall Street Journal has been used as an example time and again as having mastered the paid/free online transformation - a fine line many publishers continue to struggle with. In December, those attending the 62nd World Newspaper Congress can hear the chief of Dow Jones, the Journal's parent company, explain exactly how the conversion was performed.

The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) announced Saturday that Les Hinton has been added to the programme of the World Newspaper Congress to be held December 1-3 in Hyderabad, India.

In addition to how to monetize Web content, Hinton is expected to discuss Professional Edition, a premium service the Journal launched on October 21.

Professional Edition delivers to mobile handsets a selection of digitised news articles which are tailored to the subscriber's industry.

Following the Congress, WAN-IFRA is offering a study tour in India from December 4 to 7 to examine outsourcing and offshoring across the value chain.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-02 16:44

New York's Newsday today announced that its online content will cost US$5 per week beyond the public service basics as of Wednesday. The move, which Newsday called "pioneering," follows a trend of paid content increasingly bandied about the news industry, Reuters reported today.

According to The New York Times, the Newsday paywall has limited revenue-raising potential: 75 percent of Long Island - the geographic region the newspaper chiefly serves - has been promised unfettered access to the Web site through a partnership with Optimum Online, the local cable company. Print subscribers retain unfettered access to online content as well.

Consequently, this particular paywall may test instead the strength of bundled marketing because Cablevision (NYSE: CVC) owns Newsday as well as Optimum Online, Long Island's leading Internet provider, paidContent observed today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-22 18:31

News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch has increasingly pushed for paid online content, and last week announced that in the next fiscal year, the media conglomerate will continue to see advertising revenues dwindle. In its place, he said, consumers will be asked to pay for high quality journalism, all while trying to put a stop to "plagiarists and aggregators" of News Corp. content, The Age reported Sunday.

Using the News. Corp.-owned Wall Street Journal, as well as The Times and Sunday Times in the United Kingdom as evidence quality online content can succeed, Murdoch said he believes online subscription-based news "consumers will reward us with their loyalty for years to come and we will ultimately be able to better tailor our offerings to them while building new business models and generating more revenue."

In fiscal year 2010, News Corp.'s advertising revenues will account for "significantly less" of the overall revenue pie, a trend that will accelerate in years to come, he said, the Brisbane Times reported.

According to ABC News, Murdoch recently referred to search engine companies like Yahoo! and Google as "content kleptomaniacs."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-19 15:12

The debate over monetizing online news played out Tuesday at the Paley Center along the carrot versus stick line, paidContent reported Wednesday. Steve Brill, co-founder of startup Journalism Online represented the pro-paid side, while Vivian Schiller, president and CEO of non-profit National Public Radio (NPR), argues that payment should be optional.

At the live event, which was sold out but covered via Twitter, Brill explained that Journalism Online would be supported by a combination of ad and circulation revenue. Brill boasted that 1,200 affiliates have already signed letters of intent. Nevertheless, he maintained his stance that charging a fee would rehabituate news readers to pay for a valuable commodity.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-14 16:39

A new poll conducted by paidContent:UK and Harris Interactive showed most consumers are resistant to paying for online newspapers, the Guardian reported.

However, the study also found one possible hope for publishers: print and online may work in tandem. Only 5 percent of respondents who read a news site at least once a month would pay for online access. However, if a free or discounted printed paper subscription is provided, that number was up to a combined 48 percent.

Although the proportion of people who are not willing to pay still remains a majority, it's only a slight win - "it seems the printed edition could leverage online subscriptions; not just among existing readers of the paper, but also among those who don't already buy it," paidContent:UK reported.

This data shows most people think physical products should have tangible economic value, while digital content is expected to be cheaper.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-28 17:23

An idea five years in the making may finally have its day, The Associated Press reported Monday.

In response to public outrage, Microsoft in 2004 formally withdrew a plan to impose a gatekeeping function with every Windows interface via the Internet. "This is a personal promise directly from Microsoft to you, and you acknowledge as a condition of benefiting from it that no Microsoft rights are received from suppliers, distributors, or otherwise in connection with this promise," pledged the company in an online statement.

Today, however, using a similar concept called ViewPass, Journalism Online LLC is gearing up to bring U.S. newspaper publishers the user fees they so desperately need just to stay afloat.

Critics have long argued that net neutrality legislation in the U.S. Congress - which prohibits such Internet toll booths - is central to keeping the exchange of ideas flowing and, in turn, the quality of content rising, according to The New York Times. Other publishers such as News Corp. owner Rupert Murdoch disagree, saying that quality journalism is a pricey commodity, which free access to defeats.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-22 19:47

Hollywood trade newspaper Variety will begin charging for access to portions of its online content, its publisher revealed on Thursday and The Associated Press reported today.

Starting early next year, access to exclusive content and new features will require annual paid subscription, a move that publisher Brian Gott says is necessary to maintain economic feasibility.

"It's getting ahead of something that inevitably will happen and creating a business strategy around maintaining the viability of being a paid product," Gott said, according to the AP.

The move will provide insight into the potential for niche publications to charge their audiences for specialised online content. The newspaper's main rival, The Hollywood Reporter, has not made any plans to change access costs to its Web site that is currently predominantly free, but keeps 45-day old archives and film shooting schedules for paying subscribers only. The Hollywood Reporter is a privately held publication of The Nielsen Co.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-18 20:44

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