Date

Fri - 17.11.2017


Paid Content

Two more newspapers under the Dow Jones Media Local Group umbrella began charging for online content this week. Both the Standard Times and the Record put up paywalls on Tuesday, both papers announced.

"The Record is one of the first daily newspapers to establish a "pay wall" for its Web site. But virtually every newspaper company and many individual newspapers are working on similar models. They will be common before long," wrote Mike Klocke, the editor of the Stockton, California Record.

The Standard-Times, of New Bedford, Massachusetts, also began charging for its Web site, SouthCoastToday.com. Weekly all-access will be $4.60 per week, according to the paper's site.

German publisher Axel Springer began charging for some of its online newspapers last month, while the Economist introduced a paywall for its print edition content list and entertainment trade publication Variety began charging for online content, the Economist reported. The New York Times is pondering a similar move, according to a statement.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-01-14 22:33

More than 1,300 publishers have now partnered with Journalism Online, and the paid content network will begin testing in coming weeks, Steve Brill, the group's founder, told minonline today.

However, the group has changed its tune a bit since it began, with Brill telling minonline that "We are refusing to launch pay walls where you say to first-time visitors 'pay or go away,'" and will instead give visitors access to 10 to 15 articles for free before asking for payment. Journalism Online, launched in April 2009 by Brill, Gordon Crovitz and Leo Hindrey, hopes regular visitors will pay for complete access, while one-time or infrequent visitors won't be barred.

Questions have been raised as to whether all the unnamed affiliate publishers that have signed on to Journalism Online will go through with the plan. In September, paidContent's Staci Kramer pointed out that the number of companies (at the time it was at 1,000) that go to launch with Journalism Online may be fewer.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-07 23:26

Content wants to be free, and the nature of the Internet makes that possible - this has long been the refrain against paid online content. But as print sales and advertising have been on a downward spiral, made even worse by the global financial crisis over the past year, the argument for paid content has resurfaced, and this time, it's stronger. If news publishers haven't already put up some form of a paywall, they are seriously considering it.

However, one hurdle many general news outlets haven't considered yet was voiced by Alan Mutter. "One of the problems is newspapers fired so many journalists and turned them loose to start so many blogs," he told The New York Times. "They should have executed them. They wouldn't have had competition. But they foolishly let them out alive."

Image: Glenn Karlsen's flickr photostream

Competing with former employees is not yet a major consideration, but could become one as newspapers and other content creators push forward with plans to make some or all online content paid.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-29 22:52

Two U.S. newspaper publishers in the Dow Jones Local Media Group will begin charging for online content in January, paidContent reported yesterday. The San Joaquin Media Group and SouthCoast Media Group will roll out at least partial paywalls.

Registered members to SouthCoast sites will be able to view 10 free articles and videos each month, while unregistered users will be able to view three free items a month. San Joaquin Media Group publishes Recordnet.com, which reported that some content, such as blogs, weather, classified advertising, calendars, puzzles and national and international news, will remain free for all visitors, as well as three visits per month for local news content.

The rate for an all-access subscription to Recordnet.com will be US$2.67 per week for new subscribers. For current print subscribers, unlimited online access will cost an additional 77 cents per week.

"Recordnet.com has established its value with readers and advertisers in the communities it serves," said Roger Coover, president of San Joaquin Media Group and publisher of the Record, according to the Web site. "This shift asks readers to recognize that value irrespective of whether they read the newspaper in print or online."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-22 19:23

The Guardian has launched a paid-for iPhone application, the paper reported, hoping to develop "the world's best content-based iPhone experience."

Key themes in the development were "speed, customisation, a great design aesthetic and ease of navigation through the full breadth of Guardian content," according to a blog post by mobile product manager Jonathon Moore. The app will refresh content every 15 minutes, and offline browsing will be possible. Content is organised by keyword, and users can customise their home page. As yet there is no video and no option to comment or read comments of others.

For more on this story, visit our sister site, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-14 17:54

People are willing to pay for online news, according to a recent study of 11 countries in North America, Europe and Australia, a senior manager from PricewaterhouseCoopers in the Netherlands told the World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad today. When asked the question, "If there are no free alternatives, are you willing to pay for an online newspaper?" consumers said they are willing to pay 62 percent of the price of a traditional paper.

"This means there must be a possibility for newspaper companies to develop a proposition for your audience that is economically viable. Of course, if there are still free alternatives, it will be quite hard to do so. But if you have a good proposition, it certainly is possible to get paid for an online proposition," said Marieke van der Donk, senior manager of entertainment and media.

Marieke van der Donk, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

When it comes to financial news, the value proposition is even higher. The same survey found that people are willing to pay 98 percent of what they pay for a traditional paper, or 98 cents on the euro or dollar. For sports, the number is 77 percent, she said."If you have relevant premium content, and it's not available elsewhere, consumers are willing to pay for it. Our research has proven that," she said, adding that hard news is very hard to charge consumers for.

She also pointed out it is important to "have your strategy in place" and to be "very clear in your subscription model."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-03 07:00

News Corp. chairman Rupert Murdoch stated in a workshop on journalism in the Internet age hosted by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Tuesday that the newspaper industry needs to convince readers to pay for online content, instead of hoping government to help, AFP reported.

"Warning that "government using its heavy hand to overregulate or to subsidise us," he said that publishers "need to a better job of persuading consumers that high quality reliable news and information does not come free," according to the AFP article posted on Google News.

"Good journalism is an expensive commodity." Murdoch added that government's role is to "reduce unnecessary regulation and eliminating obstacles to growth and investment." For example, setting up a rule prohibiting ownership of a paper and TV station in the same city, he said.

In addition, he also emphasised the importance of the digital realities, as well as the shift of business models.

"The old business model based on advertising only is dead. It cannot sustain newspapers over the long term," he said. "In the future, good journalism will depend on the ability of a news organisation to attract readers by providing news and information they're willing to pay for."

"Quality content is not free," he reiterated.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-12-01 23:06

If newspaper or magazine content online was no longer free, 80 percent of consumers say they would not pay for access, a new Forrester Research report has found.

The remaining respondents who were willing to pay are split on how to pay: 8 percent said they would prefer a subscription for all online content, and another 8 percent said they would like one subscription to cover print, online and mobile. Three percent, meanwhile, said they would prefer to pay per article.

Because not everyone can agree on whether - or how - to pay, it's clear that giving consumers a choice, from free content to different types of paid content, may be the way to go, suggests Forrester's Sarah Rotman Epps.

"There's no one delivery platform, and no one pricing model, that will satisfy all consumers," she writes.

Meanwhile, almost 50 percent of North American editors have said they doubt paid content is the only answer, the American Press Institute reported in September. The API urged publishers look to the five-point plan put forth earlier this year by the Newspaper Association of America. The five points involve "doctrines" respecting true value, fair use, fair share, digital development and consumer-centric practices.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-19 23:45

A study released Monday by a business strategy firm shows that less than half of Americans would be willing to pay for news online, Nasdaq reported today. Meanwhile, as many as 66 percent of Finns, 63 percent of Germans and 62 percent of Italians on average would pay between US$5 and $7 monthly for Internet-based journalism, The Guardian today reported.

The Boston Consulting Group's findings were extrapolated from a survey of 5,000 respondents, according to Sunday's New York Times.
However, the group that produced the report has ties with Rupert Murdoch, controlling stakeholder and CEO of News Corp., who has announced the media conglomerate will soon begin charging for online content. These ties may prove to undermine the impartiality of the study:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-17 17:52

The Russian edition of Forbes magazine has launched free access to its Web site, Lenta.ru reported yesterday. The online outlet contains sections such as "Main," "Economy" and "Your Business," which are further divided into sections.

In addition, the site contains video content, blogs, popular publication material, "the best" articles from the archives, links to other publications and a page on which to subscribe to the print edition, according to Lenta.ru. Visitors will be able to access any content from past editions, which have been published since 2004.

As planned, the Web site will only share half of the material with the print edition. The Web address was initially conceived as www.forbes.ru, but was finally launched as www.forbesrussia.ru.

Forbes is currently in the middle of a legal case with Landmark VIP Services, which adopted the former address as its own, Lenta.ru added. On another note, media mogul Rupert Murdoch previously expressed plans to charge for all News Corp. Web sites, the Guardian reported in August.

"Quality journalism is not cheap," said Murdoch. "The digital revolution has opened many new and inexpensive distribution channels but it has not made content free. We intend to charge for all our news Web sites."

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-11-10 17:39

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