Date

Wed - 20.09.2017


Paid Content

The Trinity Mirror will not implement a broad paywall strategy on its websites, according to Sly Bailey, chief executive of the newspaper group.

Bailey discussed the group's stance on charging for online access to content with MediaGuardian, confirming there are no plans to install a broad paywall. The group favors charging for more specific online services and products instead.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-04 18:04

The Financial Times confirmed yesterday that payment for its day and weekly passes for its online content will go through PayPal, the e-commerce business owned by eBay. The FT first announced plans of its online subscription model last August before announcing the option of a day pass last month.

Despite previous reports, the FT will not be going ahead with a "micropayment" option, a model which would allow readers to pay a small fee to access a single article online. "Micropayments simply isn't going to work if you go to an article and you spend quarter of an hour filling out forms and ticking boxes," John Ridding, CEO of the FT, told the newspaper's Digital Media & Broadcasting conference in London.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-04 18:02

Reuters.com will add "paid services" to its web offerings this year Thomson Reuters Markets CEO Devin Wenig said in a conversation with WSJ.com managing editor Kevin Delaney, paidContent reported.

Wenig also revealed that in regards to cannibalisation of its other businesses, "the company would rather have cannibalisation come from within its company than from others."

Following the Thomson Reuters merger, the company is still undergoing integration, and won't be making "massive acquisitions" on it own. However, smaller deals can be expected, like its purchase of Breakingviews, a commentary service, Wenig said.

He also said the company will soon syndicate third-party content. However, the company has no plans to produce local content on its own. Referring to ongoing labor negotiations, Wenig said the company is "not cutting either staff or salaries," but is thinking about structuring compensation.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-25 22:03

Will consumers pay for online news and entertainment contents that are now free?

According to a recent Nielsen survey which covered more than 27,000 consumers across 52 countries, 85 percent said they would like free content remain free. However, when asked based on specific types of content, survey participants are more likely to at least consider paying for particular categories, especially if they have ever done so, the research company said in a blog post.

Will Pay / Won't Pay

Online content for which consumers are most willing to pay, or have already paid, are those which are usually paid-for offline, such as movies, music, games and current television shows. They always cost a lot to produce.

Consumers are least likely to pay for what is "essentially homegrown online," which is produced at fairly low cost, including social communities, podcasts, consumer-generated videos and blogs.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-02-16 23:02

French daily newspaper Le Figaro has announced details of its plans to charge for online content, offering three different tiers of subscriptions.

The three levels will be called Connect, Select and Business. Connect is a free subscription that allows access to free email newsletters with general, cultural and financial news. It also enables users to comment on articles and create a personalised front page.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-11 22:04

Nieman Lab's Johnathan Stray has created a paywall calculator, Paywall!, that aims to juggle the different factors that could go into building a paywall and find the best combination that could generate maximum revenue. He takes the New York Times' proposed payment model as a basis: a certain number of articles per month can be viewed free, and after that readers will be asked to subscribe.

"The key to paywall revenue projections is to understand how different portions of the audience are affected differently," says Stray, and his model breaks the audience into five groups based on their number of page views per month: fly-by, occasional, weekly, daily, loyal. Depending on how many articles are offered free, it is unlikely that a huge number of visitors will be affected by a paywall, Stray points out, but the ones that will be are the loyal readers.

For more on this article, visit our partner site, www.editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-27 21:47

Following in the footsteps of The New York Times, French news sites like L'Express and Le Figaro will be providing paid-for online content, Le Monde reported today. News magazine L'Express intends to propose a paywall in 2010, sometime in the second trimester. Online Director Corinne Denis said the publication is continuing to work on the project. However, their "model is not yet finalised" and is not profitable since its costs are higher than what subscriptions could bring.
Le Monde already provides certain pay-for features on its site. Meanwhile, Le Figaro mentioned that it was introducing a "premium" paywall option in January but put the plans on hold for a while. It may launch the feature in February, Le Monde added. Jeff Mignon, a French consultant in New York, pointed out that he did not believe that payable features would save the print press by compensating for advertising revenue loss, reported MaxiSciences. He added that, at the same time, we shouldn't judge publishers who take all sorts of initiatives to boost their profits.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-01-21 22:02

Much of the transformation in the newspaper industry is led by the big western players: The New York Times has announced it will charge for content, The Guardian has launched a paid news app for the iPhone, and the Apple tablet is eagerly anticipated.

But these changes affect other parts of the world, as the Egyptian newspaper Al-Ahram reminds us. "In Egypt, we are also experiencing a seismic media evolution," Tarek Attia writes, in a considered op-ed on the state of the newspaper industry in Egypt and the future of media.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-21 19:06

The New York Times will launch a metered paid model on its Web site at the beginning of next year, the newspaper announced today. Under the plan, users to access more than a set number of articles per month will be asked to pay a flat fee for additional access. Print subscribers will be given full access, according to the Wall Street Journal.

"This process of rethinking our business model has also been driven by our desire to achieve additional revenue diversity that will make us less susceptible to the inevitable economic cycles," Janet L. Robinson, president and CEO, The New York Times Company, said in a press release. "We were also guided by the fact that our news and information are being featured in an increasingly broad range of end-user devices and services, and our pricing plans and policies must reflect this vision."

A metered approach means Times content will still be visible online, and thus be able to continue selling a large audience to advertisers, The Times' David Carr wrote today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-21 00:44

The New York Times is expected to announce within days that it will charge for access to its online news content. After much in-house debate, the paywall is expected to be along the lines of what the Wall Street Journal uses, as well as a metered system such as the one the Financial Times uses, New York Magazine reported yesterday.

However, the big question isn't whether The Times will charge, but what kind of a paywall it will be.

Felix Salmon wrote in his Reuters blog that:

"The first and most important principle that the NYT must bear in mind is that any smart metering system will work more like a taxicab than like the dreadful FT approach: the key thing is that a meter measures how much of the service you've consumed, and then you pay for that much -- and no more. At the FT, by contrast, the meter slams down a hard paywall after you've reached n pageviews in a given month, and then charges you a very large sum for the n+1th pageview. That's stupid, because no single pageview is worth that much to a reader.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-19 00:00

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation