Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Paid Content

Google is building a paid content system, and has been reaching out to publishers to find out how willing they are to try out the service, called Newspass, La Repubblica reported Thursday.

The platform is already being tested, and would allow users to buy access to content with just one click, while publishers would be able to use the same infrastructure for all platforms - PCs, mobile and tablet, according to the report, which Google would not confirm.

Under the system, users would be able to input their details, such as a credit card number, and when searching the Web, paid content results would appear, with an icon showing the content to be paid. Users could then select to pay for the content, and be billed automatically, according to the Italian newspaper's report.

Google seems to be changing its identity once again: "from research tool to the bank and passport of the Web," the report stated.

Marketing Week notes that Google has been pushing to work with publishers in the paid online content realm for some time, last year sending a document to the Newspaper Association of America in response to the organisation's request for paid content proposals.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-21 13:06

Following the raising of paywalls across newspaper titles this month, News Corp is now putting its UK sports broadcaster, Sky Sports News, behind a paywall as well, MediaGuardian reported today.

BSkyB, which launched Sky Sports on Freeview eight years ago, is preparing to launch a new HD service. The move "marks a significant shift in BSkyB's attitude to the benefits of using the reach of the free-to-air service as a marketing channel to attract subscribers to its pay-TV service," and indicates BskyB may also put its website behind a paywall, according to the report. Sports fans will have to buy a subscription TV package to watch Sky Sports.
"As part of a subscription service, customers can look forward to expanded coverage and the launch of Europe's first HD sports news service," said Barney Francis, managiing director of Sky Sports, according to DigitalChoices.co.uk.

Sky Sports will be replaced on freeview with a "+1" time-shifted channel of Sky 3.

"I think it's another step in the chain of Murdoch deciding he won't give content away for free," Dominic Buch, an analyst at Numis, told the Financial Times.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-18 20:52

TheTimes.co.uk and SundayTimes.co.uk went behind a paywall this week, and in hopes of attracting paying online readers, the News Corp-owned titles are offering prizes of free tickets to Toy Story 3 or a weekend getaway to the Grosvenor Hotel in Dorset, Bloomberg reports.

The Times' strategy is an "all or nothing" approach, meaning all content will be behind a paywall, and Times and Sunday Times content will disappear almost completely from search results, such as Google News. The price will be £1 a day or £2 a week.

"We don't expect or require that all the people who do now will still look at it," Daniel Finkelstein, executive editor of the Times in London, told Bloomberg, in an article posted by the Sydney Morning Herald. "What's left is still a vast market."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-18 00:33

The Times of London released its iPad edition last Friday, and within three days had sold 5,000 copies at a subscription price of £9.99 per month, paidContent reported today in a round-up of iPad app sales.

Customer reviews of the app on the iPad app store say the app is great, but each voiced disappointment that the Sunday Times was not included in the app.

Image: A screenshot of The Times on the iPad, via Apple's app store.
For paid news apps on the iPad, paidContent reported that:
- The Wall Street Journal app now has 10,000 subscribers paying US$17.29 per month (free to those with an online or print subscription)
- The Australian's app, which was unveiled last Friday has 4,500 downloads. It costs US4.99 each month.

The Guardian and the Financial Times apps are both free, and have had 90,000 downloads and 130,000 downloads, respectively.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-03 04:28

The economics of online journalism say that the more page views, the better, which many say can endanger important news that may be overlooked because it won't drive traffic. But as online ad revenues aren't adding up fast enough for many newspapers around the globe and paywalls and premium content offerings continue to go up, from the Nikkei in Japan to Le Monde in France, could the tide be turning in favour of this type of reporting?

"The management shouldn't be following but trying to anticipate the changing economics of online journalism," writes Silicon Valley Watcher blogger Tom Foremski, a former Financial Times journalist. "The dirty little secret of journalism's focus on page views is that the value of each page view is decreasing, because the value of online advertising is decreasing. This means it's a strategy that will likely lead to failure. Media organizations need to adopt a multi-revenue business model, or what I call a Heinz 57 model."

So if newspapers create paid content offerings, whether they're behind complete paywalls, a freemium model or partial paywall, quality journalism may win the day at traditional news outlets.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-26 21:01

In an interview yesterday with AllThingsDigital's Peter Kafka, New York Times spokeswoman Stacy Green attempted to allay concerns over the impact the NYT's forthcoming paywall on bloggers. A new study on news and social media from the Project for Excellence in Journalism shows that 80% of blog entries link to one of just four news sources: the BBC, CNN, The Washington Post and The New York Times. Thus if the NYT's proposed paywall shuts out bloggers, the newspaper stands to lose an enormous portion of its Web traffic.

In downplaying fears over a fundamental shift to a 'closed web', the NYT spokeswoman reiterated an explanation of the 'metered model' underlying the NYT paywall. In essence, users will be able to read a number of articles free of charge, and only after exceeding their quota will they be prompted to pay for content. Furthermore, surfers who arrive at a given article from a blog link will not have that session counted against them.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-26 19:09

Unlike Murdoch, Guardian's editor-in-chief, Alan Rusbridger, has ruled out the idea of erecting a paywall around the newspaper's Web site. Since paid online content is not going to be a source of revenue anytime soon, Guardian News & Media is launching two new strategies to complement the paper's revenue stream, according to paidContent.

First up, Guardian will be launching a membership club scheme it announced last year, one that will resemble the Times+ initiative.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-20 22:47

paidContent has published some 'sneak peaks' of the Times' new website, to be launched in June. TheTimes.co.uk and SundayTimes.co.uk will replace Timesonline.co.uk and will be behind a paywall.

As paidContent noted, the new site looks more similar to the print edition than its predecessor did in terms of layout and its use of the print masthead. The lead story has a good deal of space on the home page. Another change is the introduction of an 'OpEd Live' section which allows readers to chat with the paper's columnists and opinion writers. PaidContent reported that readers will also be able to use TheTimes.co.uk to chat with other personalities via CoverItLive, though this is something that Times Online already does, in fact.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-19 19:39

A Boston area publication, The Telegram & Gazette, recently announced it will begin implementing a "metered model" paywall over the summer. Jacqueline Reis from the Telegram and Gazette staff announced on the Web site that the new model will not charge print subscribers for access to online content.

The new model will still give readers free access to the majority of content offered on the site, with the exception of the content produced by the Telegram and Gazette's staff. The newspaper's publisher, Bruce Gaultney described the new method as a way to "recognise the value of local news" that would "bring new revenue to support news operations."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-27 20:18

The founder of virtual marketplace eBay is stepping into the news business, aiming to launch a news site that will do what other news publishers are struggling with: getting people to pay for news, The Associated Press reported today.

Honolulu-based billionaire Pierre Omidyar will launch a news site called "Honolulu Civil Beat," which will be home to community news in Hawaii. Users will be required to pay to discuss issues, ideas and exchange information about matters affecting their communities. Civilbeat.com goes live today with an official launch scheduled for May 4, and plans to charge US$19.99 for monthly membership.
paidContent's Staci Kramer termed the site an "online civic square." Omidyar told her that the site will be a place where Hawiians can "learn about and better understand our home, the challenges we face, and debate and discover ideas and strategies for moving forward."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-21 19:31

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