Date

Sun - 20.08.2017


online video

The Wall Street Journal’s Deputy Managing Editor, Alan Murray, speaks to Forbes contributor Steven Rosenbaum about tracking the startling growth of WSJ’s live video presence, which reached 28 million streams in August.

Israeli newspaper Maariv "told its more than 2,000 staff on Monday that most of them will be fired by October and that the paper does not have the money to cover the severance pay they have coming if the paper closes, employees said.” Haaretzreports.

Columbia University’s Emily Bell argues that it's time to embrace the growing influence of real-time data on the media business.

The Observer, the Sunday title of UK newspaper The Guardian, is increasing its cover price by 30p starting this week, The Guardian reports.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-11 17:46

In a post on Nieman LabKen Doctor considers whether "newspapers have a shot at stepping ahead of their broadcast rivals as web video evolves."

On PoynterMallary Jean Tenore discusses "What Twitter teaches us about writing short & well"

The UK's Press Gazette reports that The Wall Street Journal is hosting a series of events with a tech theme in Shoreditch, East London, for three days from 12 September.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-30 17:48

“The change in the industry right now is the most dramatic I've ever seen... Virtually every paper in the country is, if not diving head first, at least dipping [its] toes into video,” said videographer Chuck Fadley to the American Journalism Review.

That was nearly four years ago; it is now safe to say they are doing canon balls.

The New York Times, which started including videos with digital news stories seven years ago, now produces approximately 120 videos per month, and streams two live shows to its website every business day. The Wall Street Journal, which began shooting video more than three years ago, now produces about 50 clips per day, as well as nine live shows from around the globe. Meanwhile, the U.S. edition of the Huffington Post has recently unveiled HuffPost Live, a plan to stream live video to its website for 12 hours five days a week beginning on August 13.

Logically enough, the news content is attracted by the prospect of advertising revenue.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-23 15:03

Online videos, including that from YouTube, Netflix and other sites with Flash video, takes up 37 percent of Internet traffic during peak television-watching hours in the United States, TechCrunch reported.

When broken down by top Web video players, 10 percent comes from YouTube, 21 percent comes from Netflix and 6 percent comes from Flash Video. Meanwhile, all HTTP Web traffic is just 23 percent of the total.

Image: Shaping the Future of the Newspaper's World Digital Media Trends report 2009, (c) WAN-IFRA
But that doesn't mean the main activity on the Web is watching videos. Traffic is measured by bandwidth used and how many bits are transferred, TechCrunch explains. Streaming video requires more bits than just loading a Web page; thus, "video is hogging up the bandwidth."

However, North American Internet users are behind other regions in terms of consumption, Multichannel explained. In the Asia-Pacific region, the median is 12 gigabytes. The global average last year was three gigabytes.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-26 16:08

Just as News Corp announced it would block Google from indexing its content last year, so, too has U.S. television entertainment company Viacom.

Earlier this year Viacom also took its content out of Hulu.com, a site where television programmes can be watched online, because the two could not agree on payment. In response to the situation with Google TV, Viacom told paidContent in a statement: "We're blocking access to our full episode content from Google TV's Web browser. We continue to evaluate Google TV to identify opportunities where it may make sense to optimize our Web content for the platform."

U.S. television networks NBC and CBS, ABC and Fox have also treated Google TV as a new form of distribution and are working on blocking their programming from the platform, AdWeek noted. This is likely because the networks don't want to damage relationships with cable and affiliate partners.

"The ecosystem in TV pays for the content," one media executive told MediaWeek earlier this month. "I'm not sure Google gets that. They are approaching this as if it's an academic MBA project."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-24 16:16

New online video content service The Video News Agency was launched on Monday, Journalism.co.uk reported. The service will grant journalists, broadcasters and web editors free access "to the rapidly growing wealth of high quality news and feature footage that is increasingly being self-produced by businesses, NGOs and government," according to Operations Director Daniel Kennedy.

VNA hosts videos such as corporate news, documentaries and interview to be used by media companies. In addition, there is extra material such as Electronic Press Kits for broadcasters. The video files are indexed and tagged according to sector and location. E-mail notifications are available for new content is uploaded that corresponds to sector and geographical specifications.

"Video sites are springing up for more specialized subjects and sectors, and the number of such 'narrowcasting' sites can only grow exponentially. People will seek out which subjects and sectors they are interested in, a phenomenon which is already well established in consumer online activity, where specialist advice for information is being sought for everything from health to personal finance to weather and travel; all sites of this type will start to add more video to their web presence," mentions the service's website.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-14 16:20

The launch of the "first comprehensive guide for all live and scheduled events" on the Internet was announced in a press release today. Live Matrix will be available for publishers, event organisers and individuals as a service that covers live audio and video webcasts, product launches, site launches as well as other Web-based announcements.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-13 17:20

Four out of five online Australians (81 percent), or 10.7 million people, viewed videos online in July. Total videos views almost reached a billion (970 million) in that month, according to a comScore new report on video viewing.

A viewer on average watched more than seven hours of video, which means that the time Australians spent on online video rivals that on social networking site Facebook, which totaled about eight hours a month, The Australian reported.

Over 55 percent of the video viewed, or 539 million videos, were on Google-owned sites, and 99 percent of these were watched on YouTube.

Microsoft sites, including Ninemsn - a joint venture between PBL Media and Microsoft - were ranked on the second spot with 29.6 million videos (3 percent), followed by Facebook (12.5 million, or 1.3 percent).

Yahoo! was on the sixth spot, with 5.9 million videos (0.6 percent), while Fox Interactive Media, including social networking site MySpace, was on the eighth (4 million views, or 0.4 percent) and Telstra (3.1 million views, 0.3 percent) was on the ninth.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-09-10 00:18

The CEO of online premium video website Hulu said today that he thinks in 10 years, most premium content will be free to users, and supported by advertising, Dow Jones Newswires reported.

Some video content is expected to do well in a subscription model; in fact, Hulu launched its online subscription service Hulu Plus just yesterday. The service costs US$9.99 a month and allows customers to view television shows on PCs, mobile devices and TVs. However, CEO Jason Kilar told Dow Jones he is convinced most content in the future will be paid for through advertising.

In the United States, Hulu is second only to YouTube for video content, and is in its third quarter of profitability. Last year, revenues reached $100 million.

Under Hulu Plus, subscribers will be able to access full current seasons of most broadcast TV programmes, instead of just a few, which is what is currently available for non-paying customers, Newsweek reported.

Users will also be able to watch films and television shows on devices including the iPad, iPhone, Xbox 360 and Playstation 3. However, cable programming will not be available, and neither will sports content.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-30 23:03

Thomson Reuters will launch an on-demand, customisable financial web video service for its paid subscribers, called "Reuters Insider" tomorrow, paidContent reported. The new product will include specially produced video programming by Reuters, as well as 150 of its content partners, including CNBC.

The video platform was created to help hedge funds, traders, research analysts, banks and brokers communicate with clients, as well as to transform "financial programming from a passive one-way broadcast into a highly collaborative and personalised medium," according to the Financial Times. Subscribers pay as much as $2,000 a year.
Taking the video and online social networking revolution into the financial sector indicates the increasing reliance by traders on videos with data, graphs and charts embedded within for trading decisions.

The service is much like a Youtube for the financially interested, David Carr wrote in an article for The New York Times. It has a main window called Channel One, which enables subscribers to navigate and search for videos by sector, date, markets or region, and facilitates application of filters to create personalised channels.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-10 23:17

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