Date

Sun - 24.09.2017


online users

About three-quarters of American men and women are Internet users, according to the Pew Internet and American Life Project conducted in late 2009.

The Pew study examined the demographics of Internet users in America, and found that 76 percent of whites, 70 percent of blacks and 64 percent of Hispanics in America are Internet users, detailed in World Digital Media Trends 2010, released by the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

The study showed that the younger people are, the more likely they are to be Internet users. Ninety-three percent of those between ages 12 and 29 were Internet users, while 81 percent of those ages 30 to 49 used the Internet. That number continues to drop with age: 70 percent of those ages 50 to 64 use the Internet, while 38 percent of those 65+ do so.

The study also tracked the percentage of adult Internet users in the United States from 1995 onward - it has grown from about 10 percent in 1995 to almost 80 percent in 2009.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-12-13 19:16

Sixty percent of consumers follow a brand via social media, like Facebook or Twitter, a new study by Empathica Consumer Insights research has found.

Forty percent of the 15,000 Americans and Canadians surveyed said they follow brands in order to search for promotions or coupons, while 30 percent said they do so to obtain additional information. There is growing adoption of social media at companies around the globe, but opportunities to further build relationships with customers via these outlets is also increasing, said Gary Edwards, Empathica's EVP of Client services.

Image: Ajaxcrawler.com

Social media is also one form of the modern-day word-of-mouth, with one in three saying they followed through with a friend's recommendation received through a social media site, the study found.

Social media is the shiny new tool in the social commerce toolbox, which has been around for a long time, Jordan Corredera, director and general manager of Carnival Online, at Carnival Cruise Lines, told Forbes.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-09 22:20

UK daily The Times has lost 86 percent of its online readers since it put up a paywall in June, according to a study presented today by Oliver & Ohlbaum Associates, Journalism.co.uk reported. Fourteen percent of its core audience has subscribe to the website.

Among those who used to read The Times online, 35 percent have replaced it with an alternative free website and 51 percent "have not switched to another site," explained Oliver & Ohlbaum Associates CEO Mark Oliver during the Westminster Media Forum, paidContent.org quoted.

"So far, virtually none of the predictions about what would happen have turned out to be correct," said News international's strategy and production development director Dominic Young pointing out that the paywall has had a "very encouraging start."

According to News International, The Times and The Sunday Times had more than 105,000 paid-for customers since June.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-02 22:20

On average, U.S. Internet users spend almost 25 percent of their time online using social networking sites and blogs, a 16 percent growth from the same time last year, according to the latest Nielsen research.

Facebook is the main reason this activity is growing, the Los Angeles Times reported. Of all social networking use, Facebook took 85 percent, while News Corp.-owned MySpace was next, with just 5 percent. Twitter claimed a 1 percent share.

Compared to social networking, e-mail accounted for 8.3 percent of online time, down from 11.5 percent at the same time last year, Reuters reported.

"When you're on Facebook, you can do instant messaging, you can email and share content," said Nielsen analyst David Martin, according to Reuters. "Maybe an assumption is that social networks are directly displacing some of these traditional channels for communication online."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-04 00:31

Internet users's dependence on print media as a primary source of information continues to drop, according to a recent study released by the Center for Digital Future at USC's Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism, LA Weekly reported on its blog.

According to the results, only 56 percent of those surveyed view print news as a valuable source of information. This was down from 60 percent when the survey was conducted in 2008. More people relied on the internet (78 percent) and television (68 percent) as their main news source.

The study found that only 56 percent of online users think newspapers as a valuable source of information, which decreased 4 percent since 2008.

More people, however, relied on the Web (78 percent) and TV (68 percent) as their main source for news.

When asked what they would do if the home newspaper folded and went online, only 59 percent of respondents said they would read it on online... for free, the Franklin Center for Government & Public Integrity reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-30 20:49

As The Times continues to lose online traffic after introducing a paywall in recent weeks, a KPMG survey published today revealed that British consumers are less likely to pay for online content than other web users around the world, Marketing Week reported.

The study found that 81 percent of UK users would rather go elsewhere for content if a free site they regularly visited started charging for content. Only 19 percent said to be willing to pay.

"UK consumers still haven't come around to the idea of paying for digital content and are clear that they will move to other sites if pay walls are put up," KPMG's head of technology Tudor Aw said, The Daily Telegraph quoted.

However, 74 percent of British users would be willing to receive ads on their computers in exchange for free content.

"This continues a trend we have seen in previous years and again acts as a pointer as to whether a pay or ad-funded model will eventually succeed," Aw said.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-26 18:20

Time Magazine has not put up a paywall, nor has it started asking visitors to register in order to view content. It is, however, not allowing users to see all of its content.

Time.com is now giving online readers "abridged" versions of its magazine stories, each accompanied by a message stating that the full text is only available through print and iPad editions. Or, as paidContent's Staci Kramer quips: "What the Time Inc. flagship did was slip on the magazine equivalent of a condom, a barrier between online readers and the full content of the magazine."

All week, Time has been removing content from its current issue from the website, but this next step in trying to get readers to pay for content is still an experiment, as was the magazine's first paywall, which was later removed. The current effort aims to show readers the difference between what it gives away, and what it charges them to read.

Journalistically speaking, the stories are "deconstructed for online promotion instead of reading," and also strange in that they are used to send readers to Web exclusives meant to accompany the magazine story, which online readers can't even read fully, and online readers are a majority of readers. Business-wise, the audience being asked to pay for content is now just limited to iPad owners or people who want a print copy, which is also a strange move, Kramer points out.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-08 22:10

The online audience in the United Kingdom went up by 1.9 million over the last year. More than half of new audiences are over the age of 50, according to the new data by UKOM, Media Guardian reported.

In May, online users grew by 5 percent to 38.8 million, compared to 36.9 million in the same period in 2009.

New users aged 50 or above exceeded 1 million, accounting for 53 percent of that growth. Most of them (722,000) were male while 15 percent (284,000) were female.

Women between the age of 21 and 34 followed next with 14 percent growth, or 272,000 new users. Girls between 12 and 20 gained 12 percent, or 231,000, Expert Reviews reported.

"There is still a perception that the net is youth-centric but this is clearly not the reality. The fact that one in four Britons who use the Internet today are 50 to 64 years old proves it is no longer the sole preserve of the young and technical 'literati'," said Nielsen analyst Alex Burmaster in an interview.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-30 22:45

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