Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


Online trends

In a bid to weather plummeting ad revenues and falling print readership, UK newspapers are adopting a variety of tactics. These changes come in a variety of forms, including improving online editions and Web site designs.

In the United Kingdom, the Ipswich daily Evening Star, owned by Archant Suffolk, has made over its Web site, EveningStar24. The Evening Star's sister title, the East Anglian Daily Times is also expected to follow suit in the coming months, holdthefrontpage.co.uk reported Friday.

Archant Suffolk is instituting the online edition concept, in which the newspaper will run four timed editions on its Web site each day, Mark Heath, online news editor for Archant Suffolk, told holdthefrontpage.co.uk.

Besides a more attractive Web site that features more video, various sections that underline positive business news to attract business readership have also been introduced, he said.

Sites also facilitate more readership through a new comment board that informs readers on the events encouraging the most debate, and also invites their feedback.

The What's On Web site looks more compact, carries movie trailers and is now easier to navigate as well, according to holdthefrontpage.co.uk.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-13 21:39

As the U.S. government bails out banking institutions and the automotive industry, Tim Rutten states in his Los Angeles Times column that the government should help newspapers too. Not in the form of a bailout, but through an antitrust exemption.

As demand for quality journalism increases, the ability of newspapers to fund that journalism is spiralling, yet newspapers are unable to charge for their content online as long as some are still running free sites.

"That's where the antitrust exemption would come in: It would allow all U.S. newspaper companies - and others in the English-speaking world, as well as popular broadcast-based sites such as CNN.com - to sit down and negotiate an agreement on how to scale prices and, then, to begin imposing them simultaneously," Rutten wrote in his LA Times opinion piece.

If newspapers and other news outlets were able to begin charging for content at the same time, they would then be able to turn to other matters, such as negotiating fees with news aggregators such as Google and Yahoo!.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-04 22:26

Less than two years after ending its online subscription service, The New York Times Co. may begin charging readers for access to NYTimes.com, Bloomberg reported Tuesday.

"A lively, deadly serious discussion continues within the Times about ways to get consumers to pay for what we make," said Executive Editor Bill Keller, according to Bloomberg. "Really good information, often extracted from reluctant sources, truth-tested, organised and explained -- that stuff wants to be paid for."

The Times Co. ended its Times Select service in 2007, as less readers were available to advertisers, Keller said. However, the service generated about $10 million in revenue each year.

The publisher's fourth-quarter 2008 profits were down 48 percent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-03 23:54

Television stations owned by NBC in the United States are using technology from Internet start-up Outside.in that allows users to zero in on their neighbourhoods, The Associated Press reported.

For example, rather than have one site for all of New York City, NBC will use Outside.in to create automatic subsections containing neighbourhood-related content.

About 650 neighbourhoods are available in nine markets in the United States on Outside.in, including New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Francisco, San Diego, Washington, D.C., Hartford, Connecticut and Dallas-Fort Worth. The start-up is working on a new site for Miami, the AP reported in an article posted by Media InfoCenter.

As news organisations have less staff trying to do more, hyper-localisation is taken care of by Outside.in, which will automatically customise news and information for each neighbourhood by scanning online content (NBC content as well as all outside content) and assigning it to neighbourhoods based on attributes such as business names or addresses mentioned in the content, the AP reported.

"The community is reporting on itself today, and you need to take advantage of that," said Mark Josephson, according to the AP.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-29 23:22

Web start-up EveryBlock and The New York Times have teamed up to expand political news offerings on EveryBlock's New York site, Journalism.co.uk reported Thursday.

EveryBlock, created by Adrian Holovaty and funded by a grant from the Knight News Challenge, is a data-driven site that maps out news and information by city block. The new section on EveryBlock's New York site will notify users when one of their local officials is mentioned in The New York Times, according to Journalism.co.uk.

EveryBlock will use data from the Times' Represent site, which is searchable and catalogues news coverage by elected official, according to a posting by Holovaty on EveryBlock.

The new section on EveryBlock will be called "political news items." Terms of the agreement were not discussed.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-29 22:55

Sixty-four percent of African Americans were online users as of December 2008, up from 56 percent in the same period one year ago, according to the the latest Pew Internet & American Life Project, eMarketer reported.


In comparison, Web users accounted for 74 percent of the total U.S. population in December 2008, slightly down one percent year-over-year.

The African-American online population boosted by 22 percent from December 2000 to December 2008, versus 21 percent growth for the overall U.S. population.

Based on the data from Harris Interactive, African-Americans made up 11 percent of all U.S. Internet users as of November 2008. Hispanics accounted for 12 percent and non-Hispanic whites made up 74 percent, eMarketer reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-01-27 22:18

Visitors to the top 10 U.S. newspaper Web sites were up 16 percent year-over-year in December, reaching 40.1 million, Nielsen Online announced Tuesday, AFP reported.

The top online newspaper destination in the United States in December was NYTimes.com, The New York Times Web site, with 18.2 million uniques, a 6 percent increase over December 2007, according to Nielsen data. In second place was USA Today (usatoday.com), with 11.4 million uniques, a 15 percent increase; and in third place was The Washington Post (washingtonpost.com), with 9.5 million uniques, a 12 percent increase.

In the fourth and fifth spots were the Los Angeles Times (latimes.com) with 8 million uniques, a 73 percent increase over the same time in 2007, and the Wall Street Journal (WSJ.com) with 7.2 million uniques, a 34 percent rise, according to Nielsen Online, AFP reported.

The only newspaper in the top 10 to lose uniques was The Boston Globe (boston.com), which saw visitor numbers drop to 4.1 million, a 6 percent decrease.

Although readership online is booming, the "challenge for newspaper publishers today is to learn how to capitalise on this active online readership and translate their increasing engagement into revenue," Chuck Schilling, a research director at Nielsen Online, pointed out.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-27 20:42

The worldwide domain registration industry is expected to slow during the next three years, while average prices for domain names will drop, The Australian reported Monday.

The expected slowdown of selling .coms and .nets, however, is not expected to stop the release of new domain names this year.

Worldwide, there are about 185 million registered domain names, and by 2011, that number is expected to hit nearly 300 million, according to Melbourne's MAP Research, The Australian reported.

In 2008, domain name sales generated US$3.6 billion around the world, and sales are expected to grow to $5.3 billion by 2011, according to MAP. This year, sales are expected to rise 15.4 percent, to $4.2 billion, according to The Australian.

"We won't be seeing that really large growth in domains coming from the US and Europe. The majority will come from BRIC nations (Brazil, Russia, India, China). While the overall size of the global domain industry is expected to increase over the next three years, growth will be at a slower rate than previous years and a drop in average revenue per domain is forecast," Marco Marcou, MAP director told The Australian.

Registrars are also debating whether to allow industries, business or countries to move away from domains such as .com or .biz, and instead use names such as .bank, .microsoft or .singapore, The Australian article stated.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-26 22:50

For most companies, although customer feedback is collectible online right now, only a few of them actually monitor and utilise it, according to a new CMO Council study, Ad Week reported.

Only 16 percent of the 500 marketing chiefs surveyed check online message boards for complaints and feedback, even though 58 percent believe that "the Internet and social media have changed the level of influence and expectations of their customers."

Obviously they know their deficiencies. Only 33 percent of the respondents think they do well at resolving complaints. Merely 31 percent highly rate their commitment to customer listening, according to AdWeek.

According to Donovan Neale-May, the CMO Council's executive director, this is partly due to the fact most of the marketing chiefs cannot influence customer-centric practices within their organisations.

"You've got to own it. You have to impact customer experience, not just branding. It's all the touch points: call services, service counter reps, warranties, returns. You can spend a lot of money creating demand, but if you have that customer disconnect, you're wasting your marketing dollars," he added, Ad Week reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-01-26 20:50

The global online audience ages 15 and older accessing the Internet from home and work computers reached one billion in December 2008, according to the data from the comScore World Metrix audience measurement service released Friday.

Forty-one percent of global online users came from the Asia-Pacific region, while 28 percent came from Europe, and 18 percent from North America. Users from Latin America and the Middle East & Africa accounted for niche, with 7 percent and 5 percent, respectively.

"Surpassing one billion global users is a significant landmark in the history of the Internet," said Magid Abraham, president and chief executive officer of comScore. "It is a monument to the increasingly unified global community in which we live and reminds us that the world truly is becoming more flat. The second billion will be online before we know it, and the third billion will arrive even faster than that, until we have a truly global network of interconnected people and ideas that transcend borders and cultural boundaries."

China topped other countries with the biggest online audience base in the world in December 2008, with 180 million users, or 18 percent of total global Web users. The United States came next with 16.2 percent share, followed by Japan (6 percent), Germany (3.7 percent) and the U.K. (3.6 percent), according to comScore.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-01-23 19:15

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