Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


Online trends

Thomas Reuters plans to launch a broadband video platform this summer for financial services clients such as traders and investors, Reuters reported Monday. The content not supported by advertising would be behind a paid wall, which clients with paid subscriptions would be able to access.

The service will not be live all day, but viewers will be able to select which videos they want to watch on-demand.

Thomson Reuters is not aiming to compete with 24-hour business coverage offered by outlets such as Bloomberg Television or CNBC, but does hope to compete more with traditional outlets, such as Dow Jones, Reuters reported.

The coverage will include breaking news and financial analysis, and will receive video from Thomson Reuters studios in Hong Kong, London and New York, as well as content from other outlets, including ForexTV, Beet.tv and The Street.com, according to Reuters.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-04 01:19

Growth in online readership is not enough to offset the drop in print readership, the Pew Research Center reported in a study last week.

The report follows Pew's 2008 news media consumption survey in which 39 percent of participants claimed to having read a newspaper (either print or online) the day before, showing a drop from 43 percent in 2006. Meanwhile, readership of print newspapers fell from 34 percent to 25 percent in that time period.

Of those surveyed, overall newspaper readership saw a decline, while the percentage of Americans who said they read an online newspaper increased by 6 percent. According to the report, online readers now compose more than a third of all newspaper readers.

The changes in reader habits seem to be similar amongst both Generation X and Y demographics, where marked increases in consulting online news sources were observed. Baby Boomers, however, continue to read print newspapers more than younger generations, with their tendency towards printed news remaining 13 percent to 18 percent higher than young audiences.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-04 00:58

Hearst Corp., a New York-based print media group, is set to begin charging for some of its newspapers' online content. In a staff memo, President of Newspapers Steven Swartz also outlined further novel approaches to income generation including the development and introduction of an e-reader, the Wall Street Journal reported.

The company has not decided how much content will remain free and how much will go behind a paid wall. "Exactly how much paid content to hold back from our free sites will be a judgment call made daily by our management, whose mission should be to run the best free Web sites in our markets without compromising our ability to get a fair price from consumers for the expensive, unique reporting and writing that we produce each day," Swartz stated in a memo to staff.

Hearst, which publishes of 16 U.S. newspapers, recently announced it will sell both the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and the San Francisco Chronicle due to dwindling advertising income and subscriptions. Without buyers, Hearst has announced would have to close both papers.

The possibility of digital subscription revenue is a product of Hearst's plan, "100 Days," which aims to create new revenue strategies.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-02 23:40

Computer Shopper will close its print version and move completely online as ComputerShopper.com after its last April print issue, paidContent reported Thursday.

The number of job cuts has not been revealed by the owner SX2 Media Labs LLC.

Overall, the company has been profitable, but GM Josh London would not specify if the print version had been profitable by itself. However, he did say the company is interested in acquisitions, paidContent reported.

Computer Shopper readers will not have to subscribe to the Web site, and will have full access to all content. The site's revenue streams will include display advertising, cost-per-click and cost-per-acquisition, according to paidContent.

"Unlike other media companies you may be hearing about in the news, we carry no meaningful debt, are closely held, and are well capitalized. We have multiple revenue streams and a strong base of leading advertisers that count on ComputerShopper.com as an integral part of their media plans," CEO David Sills stated in an e-mail to staff, paidContent reported.

The magazine was founded in 1980, and was acquired from CNET in 2006. Since the acquisition, London said SX2 Media Labs had planned to take the publication online only.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-27 17:32

Amazon.com has established itself as Britain's most popular digital media outlet, according to a Strategy Analytics report posted by MarketWatch. Amazon finished ahead of other leading digital media stores Apple iTunes, Microsoft MSN and eBay when Britons were asked where they would prefer to buy music, video and games online.

Although behind Apple iTunes in terms of real market share and despite a late entry into the market, Martin Olausson, director of Strategy Analytics' digital media research division, said he believes the survey indicates "that Amazon's dominance and brand strength in traditional online retailing put it in a strong position to lead the UK's fast growing premium digital media sector in the years ahead," especially in a sector that is still young and dynamic, the report stated.

The survey questioned 515 UK broadband users on their interest in and likelihood to pay to download media.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-24 19:12

Singapore is now "the most wired nation on earth," with broadband penetration in homes reaching 99.9 percent in December, The Straits Times reported.

Singapore is now ahead of South Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan, some of the world's most highly wired countries. But although Singapore's broadband penetration rate is close to 100 percent, it does not mean that almost every household has broadband access, as some homes have more than one broadband line.

The rate of broadband penetration to homes is calculated in Singapore by dividing household broadband subscriptions by the number of households, according to The Straits Times article, posted by AsiaMedia.

However, the number does not include 3G mobile data plans or Wi-Fi hotspots. Broadband popularity in the country is so high due to telecom companies lowering access rates and offering higher access speeds, as well as special incentives for signing up, such as giving away free laptops, The Straits Times reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-20 23:45

As U.S. states deal with huge budget shortfalls, Wisconsin announced Thursday it will implement a 4 percent tax on all digital downloads beginning October 1, The Register reported.

This includes "digitally delivered entertainment services," such as music, movies and ebooks. The state of Wisconsin faces a US$600 million deficit.

In April, New York passed a bill that also taxes all downloads, including pornography, which angered consumers and some lawmakers, as well as Amazon, which sued the state, paidContent reported Friday.

The download taxes apply to retailers, but are typically "passed on to consumers as a new line item on their e-bills," according to paidContent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-20 22:20

Although the advertising side of the U.S. newspaper business is hurting, readership is skyrocketing, Editor & Publisher reported Wednesday. In January, 25 of the top 30 newspaper Web sites saw a rise in unique visitors, Nielsen Online's latest report shows.

The New York Daily News reported the highest increase - a 150 percent increase over the same time last year, to 7.7 million monthly uniques.

The Daily News is followed by the Orlando Sentinel, which posted a year-over-year increase of 102 percent, to 2 million unique visitors, according to the Nielsen data, Editor & Publisher reported.

The only newspaper Web sites to see less unique users in Jan. 2009 than Jan. 2008 were USA Today, the San Francisco Chronicle, Newsday, the Baltimore Sun and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, according to Editor & Publisher.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-19 21:28

The number of people in the United States using social networking sites at least on a monthly basis will grow 44 percent from 79 million in 2008 to 115 million in 2013, a new study by eMarketer predicts.

The growth will mostly come from boomers, Generation X and tweens, Media Post reported.

eMarketer estimated that the number of users between ages three to 11 will boost 61 percent, while adults 18 and over will be up 49.5 percent, and teens 20.1 percent, in the next five years.

The overall U.S. social networking users will increase 11 percent to 88.1 million this year, Media Post reported.

One of the two leading players, MySpace, already has 130 million users worldwide, 76 million of whom are in the United States. Facebook, on the other hand, has more 175 million active users, with 70 percent are outside the United States. Facebook has been growing strong recently, with around 600,000 new users added every day, Media Post reported.

eMarketer especially highlighted the following trends in the study, such as the expanding user demographics, rising engagement, the impact of mobile social networking and Twitter, and whether the rapid growth of Facebook in the second half of 2008 will continue.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-02-18 10:21

Johnston Press is aiming to boost its online offerings by signing a deal with the UK's Highway's Agency to provide real-time traffic and travel data to its regional newspaper Web sites, journalism.co.uk reported.

The deal will allow the UK regional publisher's 323 Web sites to find a centralised content source that can be segmented and used at a local level, Mark Woodward, group editorial content manager, told Journalism.co.uk.

To implement the scheme, live footage from the Highways Agency's traffic cameras have been plotted onto a Google map, with each pinpoint refreshed every 30 seconds.

Johnston Press is also exploring other ways of making its Web sites more interactive, and has launched its first social networking trial site with the Halifax Evening Courier, according to journalism.co.uk.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-16 23:02

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