Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


Online trends

As major media companies search for new sources of revenue in the advertising starved economy, they are asking Google to push their professional, original content to the top of the search engine's undifferentiated plethora of results, reports Ad Age.

Publishers have taken issue with the criteria Google uses to select the top results, such as the PageRank system, which is based on how many links a page has. As publishers attempt to generate new forms of income in the online world they are especially at odds with Google's preference against paid content sites.
"You should not have a system," one content executive said, "where those who are essentially parasites off the true producers of content benefit disproportionately."

John Kosner, ESPN's digital media senior vice president, brought the issue to the table at Google's recent Publishers Advisory Council, an intimate discussion between Google and major publishes last November. Invitees include BusinessWeek, ESPN, Hearst, Meredith, The New York Times, Time Inc. and The Wall Street Journal, AdAge reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-23 13:48

Despite the continuing economic recession and the industry's financial issues, publishing companies continue to expand their online cooperative digital distribution and ad sales platforms, MediaPost reported Tuesday.

QuadrantOne, the online ad sales company formed by four major U.S. newspaper publishers Tribune Co., Gannett Co., Inc., Hearst Corp. and The New York Times Co. in February 2008 has recently announced new higher management hirings and new publicity campaigns.

At the top level the company has hired a new marketing director, Monika Belur; East Coast account executive for entertainment, Stacy Freedman, and a new Midwest account executive for entertainment, Melanie Pursglove, MediaPost reported.

Across the United States, QuadrantOne also hired a sales development manager for the central region, West Coast account executive for entertainment, a sales development manager in San Francisco and a sales development manager for the Central region, based in Detroit.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-19 21:57

Google and the European Pressphoto Agency reached an agreement Tuesday in which Google will display EPA content on Google News, enabling users to find original content from the eight national news agencies that own the EPA, The Economic Times reported Wednesday. Online services are available from Epa's eleven shareholding agencies.

"EPA, the participating agencies and Google will benefit from the monetisation of our original articles and photos hosted by Google, and users will benefit from the user-friendly approach to this type of display of news agency content," said Jörg Schierenbeck, managing director of EPA, The Times reported.

Before the agreement, Google News many times would show the same news agency content many times, with links to different sites, said Josh Cohen, business product manager of Google News. "Thanks to the agreement with EPA, Google News will now be able to link directly to the original article, on a page hosted by Google."

The EPA articles and photos will also show links to other Web sites where the same articles appear, The Times reported.

"The importance of this agreement is that the news agencies are recognised for the original content they create, and can generate new revenue through the advertising revenue share split with Google for all hosted articles on Google News," said Walter Grolimund, chairman of EPA's supervisory board, according to The Times.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-18 21:50

Saudi Arabia's Ministry of Information and Culture will begin its promotion of electronic journalism and online based media as it looks to fill an important gap in the local media industry, according to Zawya.com.

Saudi journalists are reported to be in support of the move, but they will not be able to launch online news ventures until the measure is approved by the government. Opening the Internet to journalists as a source and forum will be fundamental to developing news outlets in the country. This development will hinge on the expansion and introduction of new technology and the utilisation of contemporary online media.

"For e-journalism to be a success, new technology has to be applied, such as videos, sound files, multimedia services, chat rooms, and facilities for readers to leave messages," said Sara Al-Etaibi, editor-in-chief of Saudi Specialized Publishing Company. "There is no professional electronic newspaper in the Kingdom. Most Arabic newspapers have launched an official Web site in order to keep pace with the evolution of electronic journalism, but these Web sites are still very poor and do not employ the techniques that should be used in an electronic newspaper."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-18 17:56

Social Web sites like Twitter and Facebook are surpassing e-mail in terms of popularity, and occupy the fourth position in this regard after search, portals and software applications, according a study by Nielsen, the Chicago Tribune reported Monday.

Although e-mail is fast, it is just not fast enough for a growing number of users. Meanwhile, social media have more limited space, which "forces you to get to the point," the Tribune stated. "E-mail is still king at the office, but we're all embracing social media and other forms of communication. Sometimes, we still actually talk to each other!"

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-17 14:00

Blog search engine Technorati today released a list of main stream media sites with the highest number of blogs linking to them. The site provided a list of the 50 media sites that received the most links from blogs over the last 30 days.

At the top the list was YouTube, followed by The New York Times, BBC News, CNN.com and MSN.

While acknowledging the tension between mainstream media and blogs, Technorati also discovered a reciprocal relationship between the two online forums. In their State of the Blogosphere study, bloggers were questioned on the influence of media. Internal relationships with other blogs were the most influential, being the linked source of information 61 percent of the time. However, the second most important source for blogs is the primary information found on major media sites, which were linked to 46 percent of the time.

Author of the index Jen McLean described this growing interdependence of mainstream media and blogs as, "a convergence, and a symbiotic relationship."

Here is the list of most influential media sites on bloggers based on the number of links, according to Technorati:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-10 23:05

The family-owned Bakersfield Californian seems to be one of the rare newspapers that has managed not only to survive but to thrive despite a dark economic time for print media, Business Week reported.

The paper's success is credited to its 2005 launch of Bakotopia.com , an online social network that targets the youth market. An undeniable site for sore eyes given the current economic crisis, Bakotopia.com has inspired the bi-monthly publication of a free magazine composed of content from the Web edition. The magazine creates a link between the online social networking scene and the local social scene, reviewing area events and neighbourhood hotspots.

Because of the hard-to-reach demographic that makes up the readership of the free paper, advertisers are willing to pay full rates to appear in its pages. As a result, the publication is reporting profits, a real scoop considering the bankruptcies and closures that have plagued major newspapers as of late, Business Week reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-10 22:50

Of more than 4,000 online users, 80.1 percent said they are concerned with the privacy of their personal information while using the Web, according to a Burst Media study published today. The survey was designed to understand the affect of online privacy on surfers and the its subsequent effect on advertisers.

Respondents to the survey cited concern over the privacy and the subsequent use of personal information including age, gender, income and online habits. The survey also showed the level of concern increased with the user's age. Sixty-seven percent of respondents aged 18-24 listed privacy concerns, this increased to 85.7 percent for those aged over 55, Burst Media reported.

"Advertisers must take concrete actions to mitigate consumers' privacy concerns and at the same time continue to deliver their message as effectively as possible. In addition and as recently seen in the news flare up regarding Facebook's privacy controversy, publishers need to be completely transparent about their privacy policies," said Chuck Moran, vice president of marketing for Burst Media.

Further, almost 63 percent of users believe Web sites track their behaviour in order to use this information for advertising purposes. Concurrently, respondents were unwilling to sacrifice this personal information for more accurate advertising.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-09 22:33

Usage of Twitter by the media continues to expand, and most recently was ruled legal by a Kansas court. In Wichita, District Judge Thomas Marten approved the use of the micro-blogging site in his courtroom by Wichita Eagle reporter Ron Sylvester, All Headlines News reported Monday.

Marten granted Sylvester the right to use Twitter to provide up-to-the-minute information regarding the racketeering gang trial he is covering. Attorneys involved in the court proceedings have expressed apprehension regarding the potential influence on the jurors that Sylvester's posts could have. However, Marten reminded jurors they are to avoid all media coverage of the trial throughout its duration, micro-blogs included.

In other Twitter news, UK broadcaster Sky News has added a so-called Twitter correspondent, while Facebook is adopting real time, Twitter-like updates, Editors Weblog reported Monday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-09 15:50

The New York Times has announced it will make its 2.8 million articles published since 1981 available to outside Web developers to use on their own sites, Poynter Online reported last week. The results of such searches will contribute to the content of the developers' sites as well as the spread of The Times journalism and influence on the Web reports.

The API allows Web developers to search archives by section, article title, byline, and publication date among other categories, in order to create customised catalogues of information. Sites could then synthesise the data into visual representations and references to news stories.

Derek Gottfirid, the Times' senior software architect and creator of the API says that the average Web user "shouldn't be able to turn around without running into The New York Times," Poynter reported.

The Times chief technology officer Marc Frons explained that in order to succeed, it is important that major news organisation distribute their content "as far and wide as possible".

The Times plans to make money through the use of their API, particularly by licensing its use to commercial firms. Frons used the example of Google Maps to illustrate the newspaper's marketing strategy, saying that The Times will profit from providing their data the same way Google profits from NYTimes.com's use of its maps in travel stories, according to Poynter.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-05 19:14

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