Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


Online trends

U.S. newspaper company Gannett Co., Inc.'s first quarter online revenue for its U.S. newspapers was down 20 percent, Gracia Martore, chief financial officer at Gannett Co., announced on Thursday, the Wall Street Journal reported. The decline does not include financials from USA Today, the company's flagship title.

Martore said outside of online employment classifieds, Gannett's newspapers posted a low single digit increase in online income. Once an avenue publishers looked to offset declines in print advertising, the current economic climate has all but evaporated growth in online advertising income.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-17 12:09

Manchester, Connecticut's daily newspaper, the Journal Inquirer, is set to begin charging for online content as well as major major Web site expansion, The Hartford Courant reported. The newspaper will charge US$154 a year to view most stories, and print subscribers will have free access. The Web site will also see new features including reader blogs.

"Advertising on the Internet site has not yet begun to pay anything close to the expense of providing the news to our readers, even as providing the news on the Internet for free threatens to erode the paid circulation that does support the paper," Elizabeth S. Ellis, the newspaper's publisher, told The Courant.
Richard F. Hanley, graduate director of journalism and interactive communication at nearby Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Connecticut, said the challenge in charging for online content is to make that content valuable enough to attract paying consumers.

"Even then, it may not work," Hanley told The Courant. "The JI is following this spasm in the news business to fight back against free."

The Wall Street Journal is the only other major newspaper in the United States to offer successful paid for online services.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-16 09:50

A survey of 187 U.S. online newspapers conducted by online video content provider Brightcove reveals a boom in video uploads and activity last year, MediaPost reported. Brightcove's platform reported a growth of 452 uploads per month, an impressive overall increase of 1,500 percent.

The survey also showed an increase of video streaming by 35 percent and a 700 percent increase in pages that contain videos. Brightcove found that the most popular format for online videos is an ad format that in contained in a 300x250 banner which shows a 30-second video. The popularity of these videos is said to be linked to "lower production costs, higher-quality video and the gradual consumer shift from print and broadcast media to online outlets, according to MediaPost.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-09 09:34

In a speech at the same convention where Rupert Murdoch suggested news aggregators steal online news content, Google Chief Executive Eric Schmidt emphasised the importance of creating a "new format" and business model for online journalism, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Addressing the newspaper industry, Schmidt said the only solution he saw to a harmonious partnership between search engines and news sources is to "build a business with you."

Schmidt encouraged news sites to follow Google's model of depending on advertising, rather than paid subscriptions, for revenue. The executive commented that "advertising is still the best way to reach a large audience," the Wall Street Journal reported. Schmidt also proposed "micro-payments" for access to online content, citing Apple Inc.'s iTunes as an example of a site where users pay small amounts for a product.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-08 12:06

News Corp. Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch told the cable industry Thursday that the proliferation of free online content will hinder the success of newspapers' online business models, Dow Jones reported.

Murdoch pointed out that "nobody is making money with free content on the Web except search" and expressed skepticism with regard to newspapers' use of companies like Google to aggregate their content without compensation.

"Should we be allowing Google to steal our copyrights?" asked Murdoch, and continued, "If you have a brand like The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal you don't have to." News Corp. owns Dow Jones and The Wall Street Journal.

Murdoch also speculated that newspapers would eventually have to charge for access to their online news. Murdoch said newspapers are "never going to make money on an advertising model to replace what they're losing," referring to an increasing catalogue of display advertising on the Internet, Dow Jones reported in an article posted by CNN.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-03 16:32

Capitalising on its coverage of popular topics like Jade Goody's battle with cancer, the Web site of UK red top The Sun attracted more than 27 million users in February, making it the most popular UK Web site. Sun Online beat out the Web sites of the Guardian, Telegraph, Mail Online and Times Online, Media Guardian reported.

Although page views fell by 2 million compared to January's record number of 344 million, Sun Online Web sites like DreamTeamFC, Sun Bingo, Page3.com and the News of the World Web site contributed to Sun Online retaining its place as the newspaper Web site with the most individual page views.

Telegraph.co.uk reportedly was ahead of guardian.co.uk, with a 1 percent increase from January and a 113 percent increase over last year, according to the latest numbers from the Audit Bureau of Circulations electronics figures, Media Guardian reported.

Guardian.co.uk, Times Online, Mail Online and Independent.co.uk slipped slightly since January but recorded year-over-year increases. In February, that guardian.co.uk network saw the most unique users in the United Kingdom in February.

Mirror Group Digital claimed the highest proportion of UK users in January at 52 percent, which makes the Mirror's sites valuable to advertisers, according to Media Guardian.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-27 13:42

In a major restructuring plan, the Financial Times' Newsroom 2009 project will see new "news integrator" positions created, as well as the introduction of a three-stage editorial process for all channels, journalism.co.uk reported Tuesday.

The news integrators will lead on the UK News/World, UK companies/ICN and features desks. According to the Newsroom 2009 plans, there will be no new redundancies due to the changes.

In order to end workflow inefficiencies, staff, including correspondents outside London, will be trained in online production so that they are able to work for the more digitally focused newsroom, taking on tasks such as online production, according to journalism.co.uk.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-25 22:03

Google has made changes to its algorithms to make it easier for users to find more relevant results, as the changes are aimed to better understand "associations and concepts related to your search," offering related search results on the same page, the search giant announced on its blog Tuesday.

For searches three words or longer, a snippet from the relevant page will tell the user whether the page is worth looking at, by highlighting the words from the search in bold on the page.

The Orion Search technology that Google acquired in 2006 helps users find concepts related to the meaning of the search word, BusinessWeek reported.

Microsoft has also purchased a similar startup, called Powerset, last year. Last but not the least, Yahoo has been using its Search BOSS "to offer other Web developers ways to use its technology to create custom search engines." These ventures, however, have had "limited success."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-25 21:18

Michigan's Ann Arbor News plans to close in July and be replaced by AnnArbor.com, an online site that will produce news and other content for the Web on a daily basis and in a print version twice-weekly, The Detroit News reported Tuesday.

The closure comes amid a series of other Michigan papers announcing cancellation of home delivery, reduced wages, or shut downs. The Flint Journal, the Saginaw News and the Bay City Times will from now on publish print editions on Thursdays, Fridays and Sunday partnered with daily Web editions. Other Michigan papers plan to continue publishing daily, while consolidating some operations and reducing employee pay and benefits.

Steve Newhouse, a spokesman for the Newhouse family's Advance Publications Inc., which owns many of the affected newspapers, told The Detroit News that "the economic challenges are pretty horrifying in Michigan."

Michigan leads the United States in unemployment, due mostly to being the home of the struggling U.S. automobile industry, and is seeing a similar decline in daily print publications.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-24 09:22

For the first time in three years, Craigslist beat out MySpace in the United States last week as the most sought out term on the Internet, according to online tracking firm Hitwise, CNET News reported Friday.

Searches for "Craigslist" were up 105 percent for the week ending March 14, compared to the same time last year, which may mean consumers are increasingly shopping for deals online, according to Hitwise data.

During the past year, bartering has jumped 100 percent on the site, ads for garage sales have doubled, ads for roommates have increased by 65 percent and for sale ads have risen 75 percent, Craigslist spokeswoman Susan MacTavish Best told CNET News.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-24 02:56

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