Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


Online trends

A research report published by BabyCenter finds that mothers with young children are spending an increasing amount of time on social media sites and less time reading magazines and newspapers, Media Week reported.

The Center's report, which relied on information gathered through a variety of surveys answered by 25,000 participants, found a 52 percent increase in mothers who claimed to frequent social media sites compared to a study conducted in 2006.

Newspaper readership also seems to be on the decline with regards to this particular demographic; 46 percent of respondents to surveys said they read newspapers less after the birth of their child.

BabyCenter's chairman and global president TIna Sharkey commented on this finding saying, "In just a few years, we think moms using social media will eclipse those that are using newspapers."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 16:56

The Newport Daily News is experimenting with a previously untested approach to charging for online content - the cost of an Internet only subscription will be more than the subscription to the newspaper's print version, the Nieman Journalism Lab reported Monday.

The newspaper plans to plug the paper-and-ink format by making it more financially attractive than the online equivalent, while bringing in cash from those who are forced to use the online version. The Rhodes Island 12,000-strong circulation paper is published in a traditional afternoon edition on weekdays and a morning edition on Saturdays.

"Our goal was to get people back into the printed product," publisher Albert K. Sherman, Jr. told Niemen's Edward J. Delaney in an interview. "Why would they pay for it on the Internet when they can go buy the printed paper? And that's perfect - that's what we want."

The new "three-tier pricing structure" charges subscribers US$145 a year for home delivery of the print version, $245 for home print delivery and online access, and a steep $345 for the online access to the duplicate of the print edition only. However, some information, such as obituaries and wedding announcements, will remain free.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-09 17:15

Google is not likely to make a move into the print news industry, as chairman and chief executive Eric Schmidt told the Financial Times on Wednesday that the company is no longer looking into purchasing a newspaper or giving financial support to newspapers looking to move into the non-profit sector.

Formerly interested in buying a newspaper, Schmidt said the company was wary of "crossing the line" between search engine and content provider. The online search giant will instead focus on making its online models "work better" for advertising, he said.

Schmidt added that the those newspapers the company was interested in were too costly or heavily in debt, according to the Financial Times.

Ideas of protecting newspapers under the guise of non-profit organisations were, according to Schmidt flawed and "unlikely to happen without some massive, massive set of corporate bankruptcies."

He refused to comment on the 20 percent stake in The New York Times offered to Google by Harbinger Capital Partners, but did say that David Geffen, co-founder of DreamWorks who was interested in the newspaper, would make "an excellent owner," the Financial Times reported.

Schmidt also said he believes publishers moving to charge for basic news coverage online are unlikely to be successful when free content is still available.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-21 09:13

Digital analyst comScore Wednesday released the results of study examining the user demographic of British newspaper Web sites, finding a majority of visitors were from outside Britain, the British Computer Society reported Friday.

The results found that 75 percent of online readers of the Daily Mail, two thirds of FT.com visitors and 57 percent of Guardian.co.uk users were international.

"Traditional UK newspaper brands have proven to be very popular online, both here in the UK and around the world. Whether or not these titles choose to switch to subscription-based models, at the possible expense of audience attrition, remains to be seen. However, we can be certain that the online medium has enabled UK newspapers to attract substantial incremental readership from other countries - audiences that were not nearly as accessible in the days of print-only publications," Mike Read, senior vice president and managing director of comScore Europe, stated in the report.

The study also found the predominant users of newspaper Web sites were under 45, with 63 percent of the online readers hailing from this age group.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-15 08:33

The New York Times on Tuesday unveiled its "Times Wire," an up to the minute live feed of the newspapers articles and blogs as they are published, AFP reported Wednesday.

Users of Times Wire can select which aspects of the newspaper's content the live feed will present to them, allowing the reader to focus on the topics of their choosing. The live feed will then link the reader to the nytimes.com article.

The Times Wire service also utilises an updated photo gallery.

Denise Warren, the general manager of NYTimes.com, described Times Wire as a way for the newspapers online service to, "meet our audiences' desire for quality news and information on demand" and to give users "a more personalized news experience," AFP reported.

According to Nielsen Online figures out last month, NYTimes.com is the leading U.S. newspaper Web site, with 20.1 million unique visitors for the month of March.

In addition to Times Wire, the newspaper also this week unveiled its newest application, Times Reader 2.0. The application allows the reader to download the daily newspaper in a more pleasant format than on the newspaper's Web site, as it allows users to access the downloaded newspaper without an Internet connection, according to AFP. It also provides unique online interaction opportunities, such as filling in the daily crossword on the screen.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-14 07:36

More than 60 percent of users who sign up for Twitter stop using the service just a month after joining, according to research from Nielsen Online, AFP reported.

The audience retention rate for the micro-blogging site is at about 40 percent, said David Martin, vice president for primary research at Nielsen Online. Although the site's unique audience was up more than 100 percent in March, the real battle will be to keep users.

"Twitter has enjoyed a nice ride over the last few months, but it will not be able to sustain its meteoric rise without establishing a higher level of user loyalty," he said, according to the AFP article, posted by The Australian. "A retention rate of 40 percent will limit a site's growth to about a 10 percent reach figure."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-01 22:36

Fairfax Media, New Zealand's largest media company, will combine all of its publications into one online home as the Fairfax Media Digital Edition, the Taranaki Daily News reported Monday.

Fairfax Media publishes nine daily newspapers, the country's two national Sunday papers and more than 50 community newspapers around New Zealand. All the daily papers, the two Sunday editions, more than 30 of the community papers and real estate guides will be amalgamated on one Web site as Digital Edition.

The Digital Edition of the daily and the Sunday newspapers will be offered in 12 major foreign languages and will be able to read itself out loud. The company plans to offer these services to community editions in the near future.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-30 12:41

A new online portal for advertisers and agencies has been created by Hearst Magazines intended, AdAge reported Friday. The portal, which is the only means through which Hearst will accept ad submissions, is meant to standardise ad formats, making them more easily placed throughout the company's publications.

Hearst hopes the new submission policy will lend itself to less rigidity regarding the time frame in which ads can be accepted for upcoming issues. The company already reports successfully cutting the lead time for ads from 48 to 28 days for it's title Cosmopolitan, and is hoping to see more improvement when the portal is fully activated this summer.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-27 13:20

The new exclusively online version of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer has fallen out of the top 30 most visited newspaper Web site bracket, according to March statistics from Nielsen Online, which could make a case for the theory that print drives online readership, paidContent reported Wednesday. However, owner Hearst Corp disputes the result, saying internal numbers reveal a substantial increase in visitors.

The Nielsen results reported a 23 percent drop in unique visitors to seattlepi.com with 1.4 million, leaving it as the 32nd largest newspaper site in the U.S. And while leading its cross-town rival, the Seattle Times, in February numbers, Seattletimes.com recorded a 70 percent jump in online readers for March with 2.2 million unique viewers, suggesting a switch for former Seattle P-I readers.

Hearst spokesman Paul Luthringer challenged the Neilsen results saying that the company's own statistics, provided by Web analytic company Omniture, showed 4.4 million unique viewers to Seattlepi.com during March, a 9.6 percent increase from a year earlier, paidContent reported.

"The larger argument (which will not be won today) is that Nielsen's methodology is flawed. Nielsen's ratings are based on a statistical extrapolation of a small number of selected users?a statistical guesstimate," he said, according to paidContent. "The numbers have been stable, which we have been encouraged about."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-23 11:35

A study conducted by Martin Langeveld at the Nieman Journalism Lab found that only 3.5 percent of readers do their newspaper reading online only, the Columbia Journalism Review reported this week.

The study compares pages of printed newspapers viewed by readers with online pages visited by readers. "We don't have clear data about the average number pages each member of that audience looks at, but let's make an educated guess: 24. That translates to about 87.1 billion printed page views per month," Langeveld stated. As for online traffic, assuming that only one person is reading the online edition per hit, online newspapers "averaged 3.2 billion online page views per month" in 2008.

The online numbers may be slightly askew, as the article's author Ryan Chittum explains that numbers from a site's monitor, that counts actual traffic, and statistics that come from survey responses will always vary.

However, the findings remain surprising and hearken back to a 2006 study by The Pew Research Center, which found the online news audience to be "broader rather than deep."

Pew's study revealed that of the 6 percent of participants who said they read online newspapers, only 2 percent claimed to use online newspapers as their only news source.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-17 12:35

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