Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


Online trends

Compared to six years ago, U.S. Internet users are spending more time on content, according to the new data, Internet Activity Index, by the Online Publishers Association. The increase has come from communication and commerce sites, Media Post reported.

The Internet Activity Index was introduced in 2003, which tracks Internet usage on a monthly basis, across five categories: commerce, communications, community, content and search.

In 2009, an average user spent 42 percent of their time online on content sites versus 34 percent in 2003, while the actual amount of time spent on content has almost doubled since 2003, up from three hours and 42 minutes to six hours and 58 minutes, Media Post reported.

By contrast, people spent less time on communication online properties, such as Yahoo Mail, AOL Instant Messenger and MSN Groups, down from 46 percent of online time, or five hours and 20 minutes, in 2003 to 27 percent, or four hours and 54 minutes in 2009.

The share of time spent on commerce sites also dropped, from 16 percent to 13 percent, but the actual time actually gained 26 percent from two hours and seven minutes to two hours and 40 minutes. According to OPA, one reason for the shrinking time spent on communication and commerce has been the rise of social networking sites in recent years.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-17 23:10

Nearly half of North American editors surveyed doubt that requiring payment for online content is the answer to the news media's current fiscal crisis, Spanish blogger Juan Varela reported Wednesday at soitu.es. Varela's article summarises findings announced this week at the Newsmedia Economic Action Plan Conference held in Reston, Virginia, United States.

The study, conducted by the American Press Institute in cooperation with Belden Interactive, reiterates that dailies are too distant from readers as well as being too paper-reliant. API does not envision "paid content as the one source that will save journalism."

Rather, it urges a five-point plan developed at this year's Newspaper Association of America conference held in January. The five points involve "doctrines" respecting true value, fair use, fair share, digital development and consumer-centric practices.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-17 19:03

Mothers with children at home are more likely to use social media than the average person, an important piece of information for marketers, according to a Retail Advertising and Marketing Association study, conducted by BIGresearch and released today, the Birmingham Business Journal reported.

"Retailers who aren't engaging customers through social media could be missing the boat," said Mike Gatti, executive director of RAMA, according to the study.

These mothers are more likely to use Facebook (60.3 percent), MySpace (42.4 percent) and Twitter (16.5 percent) than the average adult (50.2 percent, 34.4 percent and 15 percent, respectively), according to the study's data.

"Quite frankly, moms like to talk," said Phil Rist, Executive Vice President, Strategic Initiatives, BIGresearch. "Whether they're having coffee with a friend or updating their Facebook status, these women are eager and willing to share shopping experiences, both good and bad."

Of the women surveyed, 93.6 percent said they "regularly or occasionally seek the advice of others" before buying a service or product, and 97.2 percent said they give others advice on the products or services they have purchased.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-16 21:37

Nearly 30 percent of managers said they used Facebook to vet new hires, while 26 percent said they used LinkedIn, according to a survey by CareerBuilder, paidContent reported.

eMarketer Senior Analyst Debra Aho Williamson told paidContent that Facebook is a good way to see how job candidates conduct themselves out of the office. Meanwhile, LinkedIn is a good "online resume" source, she said.

Additionally, 45 percent of respondents said they check social media profiles of newly hired employees, more than double the 22 percent who said so in 2008, according to the study, which polled more than 2,600 hiring managers in June. An additional 11 percent said they plan to begin using social networking sites to screen possible new hires.

Of respondents who said they do online searches of candidates:

  • 29 percent use Facebook
  • 26 percent use LinkedIn
  • 21 percent use MySpace
  • 11 percent search blogs
  • 7 percent follow the candidate on Twitter

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-26 15:55

In a recent ClickZ/YouTube Social Media forum, President and CEO of Technorati Richard Jalichandra pointed out that social media sites, such as Facebook or YouTube, wouldn't make it without a great content strategy, ClickZ writer Aaron Kahlow wrote Thursday.

"Simply put, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter are channels for us to post snippets of content to drive folks to a much deeper, more meaningful place of content, and they aren't original," he states.

The Associated Press has been sending out lots of small pieces of content, very quickly, to its members since the mid-1800s. When a journalist would pull something off the AP wire, he would likely go look into it further.

Today, Twitter, Facebook and other social networking sites are performing almost the same function, Kahlow explains:

"If you want to use social media and see a return, you must decide what content you'll use to engage your audience beyond the initial communication. Will you send them to a good blog, a forum to discuss the issue, or a white paper or microsite to learn more? Will you build these things and maintain them? Or will you partner with someone so your audience goes to your partner for the content, where you'll have your call to action embedded?"

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-21 15:26

Facebook has recently bought micro-blogging service FriendFeed, reworked its search engine and tested a service called Facebook Lite, which targets users in locations where bandwidth is limited. According to Reuters, the social networking giant's recent activity opens a new chapter in the company's growth.

According to comScore, Facebook is the fourth most visited site in the world, with more than 250 million users as of June. This status opens the doors to create more services that other sites provide - such as search, online payments and digital downloads, to name a few - Haim Mendelson, professor at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, told Reuters.

The Atlantic's Derek Thompson, whose article calls Facebook's recent moves an "evil, genius plan to own your life," points out that Facebook is in a position to become "the holy grail of online advertising." This means that thanks to the $50 million purchase of FriendFeed, which aggregates friends' online activities, coupled with information gleaned from users' profiles, Facebook can better gauge which sites users visit as well as which ones they like: "a one-stop shop for (a) Web user's complete identity."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-17 22:12

Teenagers use social media much more heavily than their parents think they do, according to a study by Common Sense Media, a non-profit firm that tracks media use by children, out this week.

A poll, conducted by The Benenson Strategy Group, showed that teens increasingly rely on social networking to connect with friends, classmates and people with similar interests, with 51 percent responding that they check social networking sites more than once a day. Meanwhile, just 23 percent of parents said they thought their kids check the sites more than once per day.

Other key findings, according to the poll:

- 22% of teens check social networking sites more than 10 times a day, while only 4% of parents believe kids are checking that much
- 28% have shared personal information they normally wouldn't have shared in public
- 25% have shared a profile with a false identity
- 39% have posted something they regretted
- 26% have pretended to be someone else online
- 54% have joined an online community or Facebook/MySpace group in support of a cause
- 34% have volunteered for a campaign, nonprofit, or charity

For the full poll results, visit Common Sense Media.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-13 21:56

Washington Post reporter Ian Shapira recently wrote a feature article on a business coach who teaches executives how to handle Generation X and Y employees and clients. Culture and media Web site Gawker then did what it does best, when Hamilton Nolan wrote a snarky blog post about, and linked to, Shapira's article, poking fun at the silliness of the most recent "fakest job corporate America ever created."

At first, Shapira wrote that seeing a Gawker posting about his article left him "feeling a bit triumphant" and "flattered." But, after e-mailing his editor and taking a harder look at the Gawker posting (which credited the Post at the very end), his flattered tone changed.

After hours of reporting and transcribing, "it took me about a day to write the 1,500-word piece. How long did it take Gawker to rewrite and republish it, cherry-pick the funniest quotes, sell ads against it and ultimately reap 9,500 (and counting) page views?" Shapira states in a piece on the Washington Post's Web site.

He called Nolan, who told him it took an hour or less.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-04 21:56

The Google News blog on Monday revealed that the company has quadrupled the number of newspaper articles available under its News Archive Search. The application was launched last year at TechCrunch50, displaying the search tool's ability to search publications up to 200 years old.

"Of course, why Google primarily cares about archiving these old publications is not just for information, but also for the fact that it can sell contextual AdSense ads against them. Look at this article from the Manila Standard about a volcano eruption; it features an ad to get an emergency management degree," TechCrunch points out.

Google's update reveals a number of new publications, including international newspapers and a paper that dates back to 1753.

Although no figures were listed, the launch stated that "millions" of articles were available for search. The newspaper archive will complement the extensive book scanning service offered by Google.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-04 15:46

Although the first news service to report the sudden death of pop legend Michael Jackson was celebrity gossip site TMZ, using anonymous sources, technology writer Mike Elgan reported a fake news story had been created by a non-existent news service, Global Associated News, even before. Also before TMZ broke the story, Twitter users began linking to the fake story at more than 10 per second for more than half an hour, with Twitter co-founder Biz Stone saying the microblogging site "saw an instant doubling of tweets per second the moment the story broke," which slowed Twitter and at times, even caused it to stop working, PC World reported.

"I can't prove it, but I think TMZ fell for the hoax, hundreds or thousands of news organisations all over the world linked to the TMZ story, but then the fake story became real when Jackson died nearly an hour later," Elgan stated.

Graphic: Akamai Net Usage Index: News

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 21:53

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