Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


Online trends

YouTube today launched a free tool to enable news outlets to better emphasise video from citizen journalists on their Web sites, Agence France Presse reported.

The open source application, called YouTube Direct, will allow news organisations to customise YouTube's upload platform to their own sites, and then review video and make selections.

"Every day, people with video cameras are changing the ways we get our news," Steve Grobe, YouTube News and Politics, stated in a YouTube blog. "Though we built YouTube Direct to help news organizations expand their coverage and connect directly with their audiences, the application is designed to meet any organization's goal of leveraging video content submitted by the community. Businesses can use YouTube Direct to solicit promotional videos, nonprofits can use the application to call-out for support videos around social campaigns and politicians can use the platform to ask for user-generated political commercials."

Videos editors accept are automatically tagged on YouTube, with a linkback to the original page on the news Web site. News outlets are also able to reach the video's creator directly, thus creating a "bureau of citizen stringers," a YouTube video detailing the application states.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-17 22:14

Microsoft's new search engine, Bing, kept on growing slowly and its market share was up another half point in October, Business Insider reported.

Bing's market share was up from 9.4 percent in September to 9.9 percent in October, according to comScore.

Compared to the figures in June this year, it has had an 18 percent growth. "That is significant, but not overwhelming," according to Business Insider.

Yahoo, however, lost almost one percentage point from 18.8 percent in September to 18 percent in October, while Google's share was up a little from 64.9 percent to 65.4 percent

The overall search volume rose 13.2 percent in October, although lower than the 17.3 percent growth in September.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-11-17 21:45

A study released Monday by a business strategy firm shows that less than half of Americans would be willing to pay for news online, Nasdaq reported today. Meanwhile, as many as 66 percent of Finns, 63 percent of Germans and 62 percent of Italians on average would pay between US$5 and $7 monthly for Internet-based journalism, The Guardian today reported.

The Boston Consulting Group's findings were extrapolated from a survey of 5,000 respondents, according to Sunday's New York Times.
However, the group that produced the report has ties with Rupert Murdoch, controlling stakeholder and CEO of News Corp., who has announced the media conglomerate will soon begin charging for online content. These ties may prove to undermine the impartiality of the study:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-17 17:52

The New York Times may soon begin to charge for online content. "We're within weeks of a decision," Executive Editor Bill Keller said Saturday.

The newspaper's management expected to make a decision by late summer, but are still weighing the complicated issue. Although charging for some online content would bring in subscription revenues, that potential revenue could cut into the millions in advertising dollars, as online advertisers want to reach the largest amount of readers as possible, Clark Hoyt reported.

"It's a much tougher, more complicated decision than it seems to all the armchair experts. There is no clear consensus on the right way to go," Keller said, according to The Times.

Payment options include charging for premium content, introducing subscription elements, micropayments or perhaps forming a consortium with other newspaper groups, Brand Republic reported today. "The difficulty in reaching a decision will likely have ramifications for the rest of the newspaper industry, which is looking to the New York Times as an indication for what it might try," the article stated.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-02 21:58

News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch has increasingly pushed for paid online content, and last week announced that in the next fiscal year, the media conglomerate will continue to see advertising revenues dwindle. In its place, he said, consumers will be asked to pay for high quality journalism, all while trying to put a stop to "plagiarists and aggregators" of News Corp. content, The Age reported Sunday.

Using the News. Corp.-owned Wall Street Journal, as well as The Times and Sunday Times in the United Kingdom as evidence quality online content can succeed, Murdoch said he believes online subscription-based news "consumers will reward us with their loyalty for years to come and we will ultimately be able to better tailor our offerings to them while building new business models and generating more revenue."

In fiscal year 2010, News Corp.'s advertising revenues will account for "significantly less" of the overall revenue pie, a trend that will accelerate in years to come, he said, the Brisbane Times reported.

According to ABC News, Murdoch recently referred to search engine companies like Yahoo! and Google as "content kleptomaniacs."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-19 15:12

Facebook attracts more highly educated users than MySpace in the United States, and in Canada it is the top social media destination, according to new, unpublished research from Eszter Hargittai, associate professor of communication studies at Northwestern University, CBCnews.ca reported today.

However, the reason Facebook is tops in Canada has nothing to do with education, and likely has more to do with the fact that by the time social networking caught on in Canada, MySpace was "more for teenagers and not taken as seriously." Meanwhile, "Canadian academics who travelled to the U.S. started using Facebook and immigrants who came to large Canadian cities also were Facebook users," Rhonda McEwen, information studies professor at the University of Toronto, suggested to CBCnews.

According to Hargittai, online, people will network with the same people they already know. "Existing social divisions translate online," she said.

And while Facebook was originally started by students, for students, MySpace initially attracted non-students and students alike. As time went by, students and graduates switched to Facebook to be on the same networking site as their peers.

In the United States, Facebook grew by 4 percent to 95.5 million in September, according to the Orlando Business Journal.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-15 20:24

Although people are increasingly using social networking and text messaging, it doesn't mean they are cutting down on e-mail usage. Rather, the rate at which the online population uses e-mail is growing at more than double the rate of growth for either social media or texting, the ExactTarget 2009 E-mail Utilization Whitepaper has found, according to Business Wire.

The total number of social media users is rapidly increasing, but often these users jump in quickly, only to curtail their use of social media over time," said Morgan Stewart, ExactTarget`s director of research and strategy, according to the release. "E-mail on the other hand, is woven into all online interaction, making it an essential tool that consumers continue to use more and more."

In fact, according to a study released in September by The Nielsen Company, social media actually contributes to e-mail use.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-14 22:47

Google often touts the massive traffic it drives to newspaper Web sites - 1 billion click throughs from Google News per month. But what if that traffic is all but worthless?

That was the heart of the debate today in the opening session of the 2015 Newsroom Conference, organised by the World Editors Forum at PPF Media's Futuroom complex in Prague. Santiago de la Mora, head of print content partnerships for Google News in Europe, cited the massive traffic figure. But Matt Kelly, associate editor of the Daily Mirror and mirror.co.uk, questions its value.

"Some of our competitors have 30 million unique users a month, and you would think that any business that has 30 million unique users would be the happiest in the world. But they're not. They're worried," Kelly said.

The reason is simple: Users have been trained by Google and by the "cheap worthless technological news solutions out there" to graze many different websites for content with no value going back to the creator of that content. "Often they have no idea which website provided the information they found interesting." And, as a consequence, advertisers are not interested because there is no real audience in the traditional sense.

But Kelly doesn't blame Google for what he calls "parasitic consumption."

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2009-10-01 18:15

An idea five years in the making may finally have its day, The Associated Press reported Monday.

In response to public outrage, Microsoft in 2004 formally withdrew a plan to impose a gatekeeping function with every Windows interface via the Internet. "This is a personal promise directly from Microsoft to you, and you acknowledge as a condition of benefiting from it that no Microsoft rights are received from suppliers, distributors, or otherwise in connection with this promise," pledged the company in an online statement.

Today, however, using a similar concept called ViewPass, Journalism Online LLC is gearing up to bring U.S. newspaper publishers the user fees they so desperately need just to stay afloat.

Critics have long argued that net neutrality legislation in the U.S. Congress - which prohibits such Internet toll booths - is central to keeping the exchange of ideas flowing and, in turn, the quality of content rising, according to The New York Times. Other publishers such as News Corp. owner Rupert Murdoch disagree, saying that quality journalism is a pricey commodity, which free access to defeats.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-22 19:47

Market research firms comScore and Omniture have launched a new system to analyse Web audiences, the companies announced Monday, CNET News reported. The companies aim to merge Omniture's Web analytics with comScore's ability to view user patterns, to give both panel and traffic-based data, according to paidContent.

By combining the two types of data, the companies hope to give a better picture and analysis of Web traffic, instead of conflicting reports many online media outlets and advertisers usually receive, Forbes reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-22 18:46

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