Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


online revenue

The Chinese Communist party newspaper People’s Daily has raised 1.4 billion yuan ($219 - $222 million) after filing an Initial Public Offering (IPO) for its website www.people.com.cn. As The Financial Times reported on Friday, this figure is almost three times the paper’s initial target of 527m yuan. The FT writes that people.com.cn now has a market capitalisation of $876m – rivalling that of The New York Times, which is valued at $943m.

The FT suggests that the Chinese authorities are hoping that the IPO will help state media expand their global influence. The financial paper points out that although state Chinese media have been commercially successful, tehy is vastly overshadowed by private Chinese digital companies like Sina and Tecent. Now, however, the Chinese state media seem to be looking to compete more aggressively. The FT quotes People’s Daily, which states, “we need to increase our popularity, expand the range of products and services we offer, reach a wider audience and increase page hits per visitor.” With the apparent aim of expanding its editorial impact, Chinese state television is also constructing a broadcasting centre in Washington, notes The FT.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-23 13:25

Looking for ideas on creating better, more promising online revenue streams?

Look no further than the infographic by Doogie Horner, author of "Everything Explained Through Flowcharts," published online by Fast Company.

The first step, he points out, is figuring out what people will and won't pay for. To the left is a zeroing in on the content section. Click here for the full chart.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-09 20:44

Yesterday The Associated Press reported that Google and the AP have updated their licensing deal for online content. Specifics of the arrangement were not released to the public, although there are two main factors in the deal: Google will purchase the AP's content for an undisclosed amount, and the two companies will also collaborate to increase the AP's online revenue. The terms of the contact may not be dramatically different from previous licensing contracts, yet the recent announcement marks a shift in more diplomatic relations between the AP and Google.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-31 16:54

In 2008, U.S. newspapers saw their online segment grow to approximately US$3.3 billion, 5 percent more than in 2007. This is the first time since 2001 that single-digit average growth has been recorded, and at the local level results were very uneven, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

The growth in newspaper online revenues has, on any reckoning, been impressive.

At the end of 2008, interactive spending held an 11.5 percent share of all local ad spending. The last Borrell Associates research suggests that it is headed for a 15 percent to 18 percent share before levelling off within five years. If it reaches 18 percent, it will become the second-largest shareholder of local advertising, behind newspapers, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-24 22:52

Parade magazine is now selling ads on the Web sites of its partner newspapers as an alternative method of revenue making, MediaWeek reported.

Parade is an insert on weekend editions of newspapers across the United States. Having started distributing celebrity and game content to the carrier paper sites a year ago, this strategic initiative by the magazine to sell on its papers' Web sites is aimed at effectively transforming the Sunday newspaper supplement into an online ad network.

The new online ad partnership means that local papers can now get national ads, which wouldn't otherwise be available through ad networks or on their own, and the magazine gets a cut of the revenue for effective sale.

"As we push this content out, there's a cost for us, and as our digital footprint grows, we wanted to take advantage of that," Parade publisher Brett Wilson told MediaWeek.

Wilson said the new set-up is a "syndicated network - in the positive sense of the word," as Parade magazine customises ads around the branded content it syndicates. Relying on external sources for editorial content, the Parade's content strategy spans as a trend across print media.

Parade's sales strategy so far appears to be appealing to retailers and packaged goods providers looking to drive purchasing power, Ildi Pap Conrad, U.S. director of print investment, OMD, told MediaWeek.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-07 22:13

The Philadelphia Inquirer's, Philly.com has entered into a partnership with Fanduel.com to boost its online revenues through online sports betting, a press release posted on Casino City Times announced. This is the first U.S. newspaper partner FanDuel, created by UK social gaming company HubDub.

Many UK newspapers have offered betting and online paid games for years, but U.S. law is much more strict when it comes to online gambling. FanDuel is exempt, however, due to "the fantasy sports carve out in the 2006 Unlawful Internet Gaming Enforcement Act; as stated, the only difference is that FanDuel-powered fantasy sports games only last a day (for baseball) and a week (for football)," TechCrunch Europe reported.

Philly.com plans to launch an online fantasy sports game touted as a "one-night stand," as players play and win in as little as a day, using real money, according to the press release. The game was first launched by the company in July 2009 as a standalone version, and is seen by many as the future of fantasy sports.

As newspapers struggle to maximise online revenues, this deal is a clever move by The Inquirer to generate revenue from commissions, thereby proving mutually profitable to FanDuel as well, TechCrunch commented.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-09 04:23

Online media revenue in the Middle East and North Africa is expected to spike to US$600 million by 2015, from less than $100 million last year, research from global consulting firm Booz and Company shows, The National reported today. Mobile revenues are also increasing, expected to reach $2.7 billion.

According to the report, 70 percent of audiences in MENA countries said they spend two hours or more on the Internet each day, while 36 percent said they spend two or more hours watching TV.

"This tells us where our listeners are going to be, and where we need to start making significant headway. This doesn't mean traditional media will take a back seat, it just means new media will be as important," Karim Sabbagh, vice president of Booz and Company, told the audience of the Abu Dhabi Media Summit, according to Gulf News.

Also in the MENA region, broadband usage is expected to rise by 40 percent by the end of 2015, according to the report.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-10 01:06

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