Date

Fri - 24.11.2017


online readership

Newspaper publishers need to quickly solve a troublesome equation. As carbon-based readership keeps dwindling, the growing legion of digital readers is poorly accounted for. This benefits advertisers who pay less for their presence.

Putting aside web sites audience measurement, we'll focus instead on the currently ill-defined notion of digital editions. A subject of importance since digital editions are poised to play a key role in the future of online information.

Continue reading on Monday Note

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-29 10:25

Not long ago, some news organizations were beginning to give up on online video. It required significant resources, and it wasn't generating as much revenue or traffic as they had hoped. News organizations that have stuck with it, though, have found that video provides them with a way to advance what they're already doing well, increase time on site, and engage users in ways that traditional narratives can't.

The Miami Herald is one of the media outlets that has had noticeable success with video. Last year, MiamiHerald.com saw about a 25 percent growth in video traffic, making it the second biggest traffic driver behind articles.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-04 14:00

Despite preferring print newspapers to electronic versions, Italians are slowly starting to change their mentality towards digital news. In 2010, the number of Italians who read online dailies has increased to 39 percent, according to a Mediawatch Journalistic Observatory survey, La Stampa reported today.

"Italians' confidence in the Internet has significantly increased over the past three years... This is an area that can become strategic," Mediawatch's President Carlo Vittorio Giovannelli said to La Voce d'Italia, remembering than in 2007 only 25 percent of Web users read online news.

Photo source: La Stampa

Trust in the information provided by online dailies has also increased from 18 percent to 45 percent in the last three years, the survey revealed.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-04 17:39

Pearson PLC, owner of the Financial Times, reported a 27 percent increase in the newspaper's digital readership in the first six months of the year, Media Week revealed today.

According to the company, the number of registered users at FT.com went up by 77 percent to 2.5 million, while its iPad application reached almost 250,000 downloads.

The economic daily recorded a sales increase of 7 percent to £190 million, and it doubled its operating profit, from £14 million to £30 million, due to an advertising revenue growth, Reuters explained.

"The FT is growing in both digital and print advertising and all regions of the world are increasing," Pearson's Chief Executive Officer Marjorie Scardino said, Bloomberg quoted. "We see a steady increase, though our strategy is to move away from a dependency on advertising. There is poor visibility still in advertising."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-26 18:36

Following reports over the weekend that the Times had lost 66 percent of its online traffic since introducing compulsory registration and a paywall in recent weeks, MediaGuardian has now reported that the Times lost almost 90% of its online readership compared to February. This is the figure that was previously predicted by Sunday Times editor John Witherow, and is, according to the Guardian, "the standard experience when a site moves to a paid-access model instead of free access."

The Guardian's calculations are based on data from Experian Hitwise (as was the 66% figure) that shows how many people have attempted to access the site and how many people register to reach the home page. Taking into account figures provided by Dan Sabbagh, Beehive City blogger and former Times media correspondent, MediaGuardian concludes that the total number of daily visitors to the Times' site has fallen by about 84 percent since May.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-20 18:46

Italians like to read newspapers and they would not trade a print copy for an electronic version even if it was cheaper, a recent survey conducted by IPR Marketing for Il Sole 24 Ore revealed.

In fact, 62 percent said they would not be interested in reading a newspaper online because the paper version is more practical to read and it is less tiring for the eyes. "Only 32 percent of those interviewed said that, with the existence of new technologies, papers would be substituted by digital versions," Il Sole 24 Ore reported.

Although 25 percent of those who are willing to pay for content would subscribe for a monthly fee, 26 percent would prefer to pay for article. Currently, most national dailies, like La Repubblica and Il Corriere della Sera, offer the content for free.

However, Italian opposition to online newspapers has nothing to do with low Internet usage or lack of interest. According to data provided by Audiweb, 43.4 percent of the population surfed the web in May - a 14 percent increment when compared to May 2009.

Il Sole 24 Ore's study revealed that 82 percent of Italians go online to read stories provided by newspapers and news agencies. Furthermore, one third of users are eager to read a daily online edition.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-14 00:46

To increase the low newspaper readership in Italy, President of the Communication Regulatory Agency (Agcom) Corrado Calabrò proposed on Tuesday "a governmental bonus for students who subscribe to a newspaper website," the news agency Apcom reported.

As the iPad and other e-reader gadgets become popular, the Italian official sees an opportunity to reconcile young people with newspaper and book reading. "There could be a new season for reading in a new format."

The proposal would also tackle the low usage of broadband and should increase the number of families that use Internet, as the country is below the European Union average in both aspects, Il Sole 24 Ore quoted.

In 2009, circulation of Italian dailies decreased 7.7 percent while advertisement in the press - which still remains the principal source of revenue - declined by 21.5 percent from €2.4 million €1.9 million, according to Dow Jones.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-08 16:15

Readers in the United Kingdom are willing to pay for print newspapers but not for online content, a YouGov SixthSense report revealed yesterday.

Compared with 83 percent of readers that refuse to pay for online news, the study found that two thirds of readers would buy a "good newspaper," NewMediaAge reported. Only 4 percent would be willing to pay for online information if a quality newspaper was not available.

Photo: Ed Yourdon's Flickr photostreamWhen given the option to pay for print daily or to read a free newspaper, 44 percent would buy a newspaper because they consider freesheets to not have "much real content." Nonetheless, 38 percent believe the current price of newspapers is too high.

"When you are used to receiving free reporting for nigh on ten years, you are not going to one day start compliantly paying for the same content," said James McCoy, research director of YouGov SixthSense, according to journalism.co.uk.

The survey came out two days before the launch of The Times and The Sunday Times' paywalls, which are expected to start tomorrow.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-01 19:23

The BBC online has become the fifth referral site to UK newspaper websites, as it "sent nearly two million unique visitors to the papers in April," paidContent reported yesterday.

Although Google remains the top global referral site with almost 40 million unique visitors, the data compiled by the Newspaper Marketing Agency shows that the BBC News site is sending as many readers as Bing, Microsoft's search engine. Direct hits are in second place after Google, with almost 27.5 million unique visitors.

Chart: via paidContent

The only news site that refers more visitors than the BBC is Drudge Report, a news aggregation website that contributes almost seven million referrals.

Overall, "The BBC News site is contributing nearly 2.3 percent of the total unique visitors the sites get from their top 20 sources," explained paidContent.

According to the Newspaper Marketing Agency's April report, other top traffic drivers are Yahoo, Stumbleupon.com, Facebook, Digg.com and Wikipedia.

The good news for the BBC comes two years after launching its Newstracker system, which gives readers a list of related news stories that have been published by the media.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-06-30 00:03

All five national newspaper sites in the UK had a month-to-month traffic rise in May, mostly due to the election coverage, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, Media Guardian reported.

The overall traffic hit a record high at 131.8 million, paidContent reported.

Graphic: ABCe

The most visited site went to Mail Online, up 1 percent compared to the previous month, to 2.39 million average daily browsers and 42.37 million monthly browsers. It was on the top for the fifth month, according to ABC.

The Daily Mail & General Trust's Web sites increased 9.4 percent month-on-month to 2.01 million average daily browsers, while Telegraph.co.uk came next with about 1.6 million average daily browsers, up 4 percent compared to the figures in April, Press Gazette reported.

Mirror Group Digital gained most month-on-month, up nearly 14 percent to exceed 502,000 average daily browsers, Media Guardian reported.

Independent.co.uk was up 9 percent to 481,954 average daily browsers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-24 23:41

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