Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Online content

Content still takes up the most time spent online in U.S., and continued to grow in 2007, according to the OPA Internet Activity Index, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2008 reported.

By December 2007, it accounted for nearly half of online time.

Communication made up the second most time spent online, but has shrunk since 2006. In December 2007, it accounted for nearly 30 percent.

Commerce takes up about 18 percent of time spent online, according to OPA.

Additionally, search still made up the least time spent online in December 2007; however, it is rising, up from 4.7 percent in December 2006 to 5.2 percent in December 2007, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2008, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-03-19 17:10

Google and the European Pressphoto Agency reached an agreement Tuesday in which Google will display EPA content on Google News, enabling users to find original content from the eight national news agencies that own the EPA, The Economic Times reported Wednesday. Online services are available from Epa's eleven shareholding agencies.

"EPA, the participating agencies and Google will benefit from the monetisation of our original articles and photos hosted by Google, and users will benefit from the user-friendly approach to this type of display of news agency content," said Jörg Schierenbeck, managing director of EPA, The Times reported.

Before the agreement, Google News many times would show the same news agency content many times, with links to different sites, said Josh Cohen, business product manager of Google News. "Thanks to the agreement with EPA, Google News will now be able to link directly to the original article, on a page hosted by Google."

The EPA articles and photos will also show links to other Web sites where the same articles appear, The Times reported.

"The importance of this agreement is that the news agencies are recognised for the original content they create, and can generate new revenue through the advertising revenue share split with Google for all hosted articles on Google News," said Walter Grolimund, chairman of EPA's supervisory board, according to The Times.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-18 21:50

Saudi Arabia's Ministry of Information and Culture will begin its promotion of electronic journalism and online based media as it looks to fill an important gap in the local media industry, according to Zawya.com.

Saudi journalists are reported to be in support of the move, but they will not be able to launch online news ventures until the measure is approved by the government. Opening the Internet to journalists as a source and forum will be fundamental to developing news outlets in the country. This development will hinge on the expansion and introduction of new technology and the utilisation of contemporary online media.

"For e-journalism to be a success, new technology has to be applied, such as videos, sound files, multimedia services, chat rooms, and facilities for readers to leave messages," said Sara Al-Etaibi, editor-in-chief of Saudi Specialized Publishing Company. "There is no professional electronic newspaper in the Kingdom. Most Arabic newspapers have launched an official Web site in order to keep pace with the evolution of electronic journalism, but these Web sites are still very poor and do not employ the techniques that should be used in an electronic newspaper."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-18 17:56

The Seattle P-I will live to publish another paper, and staff has been told that today's paper won't be their last, The Associated Press reported today.

Hearst Corp., the owner of the paper, has publicly been looking for buyers and announced that if no interested party is found in the next 60 days, the paper will be forced to shut down or continue as a Web-only edition.

Hearst has offered positions with the online edition to some staffers, but the majority of the P-I employees are expected to lose their jobs, according to the AP article, posted by Editor & Publisher.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-11 15:18

Blog search engine Technorati today released a list of main stream media sites with the highest number of blogs linking to them. The site provided a list of the 50 media sites that received the most links from blogs over the last 30 days.

At the top the list was YouTube, followed by The New York Times, BBC News, CNN.com and MSN.

While acknowledging the tension between mainstream media and blogs, Technorati also discovered a reciprocal relationship between the two online forums. In their State of the Blogosphere study, bloggers were questioned on the influence of media. Internal relationships with other blogs were the most influential, being the linked source of information 61 percent of the time. However, the second most important source for blogs is the primary information found on major media sites, which were linked to 46 percent of the time.

Author of the index Jen McLean described this growing interdependence of mainstream media and blogs as, "a convergence, and a symbiotic relationship."

Here is the list of most influential media sites on bloggers based on the number of links, according to Technorati:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-10 23:05

A conflict is rising between digital media buyers and online publishers following the proposal of new trading terms by GroupM's digital agencies, The Australian reported Monday. The terms and conditions stipulate that all user data yielded by the communication service's online campaigns belongs to the agency or the advertiser and not the publisher, whose site runs the advertisements.

While the new terms have already been agreed to by publishers in the United States, Australian publishers such as Fairfax, News Limited and Ninemsn want access to and control over data created by campaigns running on their Web sites. Among the dissenters, Fairfax plans to change its trading terms to ban advertisers from tagging its audience while Ninemsn is updating its terms to ban ad-tagging unless the advertising has obtained the publisher's written consent.

GroupM Interaction's Asia Pacific CEO Alice Manners told The Australian that the terms are meant to keep client data confidential so that "when media are talking to other clients they're not revealing our clients' data."

The hostility that characterises both sides of the debate is symptomatic of "a level of animosity building between digital media buyers and Internet publishers not seen in other media," according to industry observers, The Australian article stated.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-04 01:17

Non-profit auditing organisation ABCe last week released its official audit figures, placing the Guardian Online at the top of the pack in the United Kingdom.

All of the seven major newspaper Web sites studied showed a significant increase in traffic, with the Guardian.co.uk leading the trend with almost 30 million users during the first month of the year. Events such as the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, U.S. President Barack Obama's inaugural ceremony and the continuing economic depression have been credited for making January a particularly busy news period, in turn, leading to a boost in online news followers.
Following the Guardian in second place and with roughly 4 million less visitors was The Telegraph site, equating to an impressive 110 percent increase on the previous year. The Times Online, including the Sunday Times, which overtook the Daily Mail to gain third place with 23 million unique viewers, saw a 52 percent growth in traffic. The results demonstrated a similar upward trend for the other sites analysed.

Author

Soraya Kishtwari

Date

2009-03-02 20:30

Contentious Philippine "Right of Reply" bill has been labelled as a potential "undue intrusion" on media rights by Commission on Human Rights of the Philippines chairperson Leila de Lima, Inquirer.net reported Thursday.

The senate has passed its version, while the house bill is pending. Both bills would require media channels to publish a party's reply when that party is offended by reports or commentaries. The reply have to have the same prominence and media space as the offending story. Failure to comply would see large fines and in one version a jail sentence.

Philippine media began a protest against the bill this week, branding the proposed legislation as an "act of terrorism against the media," and against the constitution, Inquirer.net reported.

De Lima advocated media self-regulation as the correct approach. "I always believe that it should be self-regulation by media, no legislation is needed. Self-regulation is the best tack," De Lima said at a press conference.

The Philippine senate passed its version of the bill last year. House Bill 3306 is awaiting debate in the lower chamber.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-26 19:24

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