Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


Online content

Cox Enterprises plans to partner its network provider Adify with its online ad site AutoTrader.com paidContent.org reported.

The partnership is intended to take advantage of the holes in the car advertising market as well as bring together 40 of Cox Media's local sites, including AskPatty.com, AutoMart.com and GreenCar.com. Cox hopes to appeal to the struggling automobile industry by offering low cost, consumer-targeted advertising.

Cox Enterprises has also made a bid to buy up shares it doesn't yet own in Cox radio.

The restructuring decisions were made after recent news that News-Journal Corp. may be trying to sever its ties with Cox by filing bankruptcy.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-21 20:22

Three top U.S. media executives, Court TV founder Steven Brill, former Wall Street Journal publisher Gordon Crovitz, and Leo Hindery, a former chief executive of AT&T Broadband, have started a company aimed to help the newspaper and print industry derive income from the Internet, AFP reported.

The project, Journalism Online, aims to target readers that "will continue to support journalists by paying a modest, fair price for original, independent, professional work distributed online."

Brill said the company has already held talks with most major U.S. newspaper and magazine publishers and they expressed "strong interest" in the venture.

"We think this is a special moment in time when there is an urgent need for a business model that allows quality journalism to be the beneficiary of the Internet's efficient delivery mechanism rather than its victim," he told AFP. "We believe we have developed a strategy and a set of services that will establish that model by restoring a stream of circulation revenue to supplement advertising revenue."

The Wall Street Journal is the only major U.S. paper to currently charge for access to portions of its Web site, but many other newspapers are considering the introduction of different pay for content models.

Journalism Online is set to be a "password-protected Web site with one easy-to-use account through which consumers will be able to purchase annual or monthly subscriptions, day passes, and single articles from multiple publishers," the founders stated, according to AFP.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-15 20:23

Teenagers in the Internet age are unlikely to pay for news, reports Wired.com. The study shows that young news seekers consider new sources as something they shouldn't be required to pay for access. This news is troubling given recent proposals in the news media to implement paid online subscriptions.

As far as aggregated news in concerned, the study shows that teen readers frequent sites such as Yahoo! and Google for their news coverage. The study surmised that the youth market prefers such sites because of "their brevity and compact approach." Other characteristics of sites that teens claimed to appreciate are condensed, low-volume information, uncluttered home pages, and photos or other illustrations accompanying stories.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-13 11:56

UK newspaper industry trade magazine and Web site Press Gazette will close, despite a 50 percent increase in unique users over last year, owner Wilmington Group announced Monday.

The monthly magazine counted 2,500 subscribers, each of whom paid £115 per year, and its Web site tracked approximately 150,000 visitors per month, which marked an increase of 50 percent from the preceding year, Media Guardian reported. The May issue will be the magazine's last.

Press Gazette was bought by Wilmington in 2006 after several changes in ownership and format. For most of its history, the magazine was printed on a weekly basis, but the edition moved to a monthly printing backed by an online edition that reported breaking news.

The plan is to eventually continue publishing on the Press Gazette Web site, although new content will not include journalism.

"There will not be news coverage but we will develop the site to offer other services, such as training and freelance referrals," said Les Kelly, managing director of Wilmington's media and entertainment division, according to Media Guardian.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-07 16:41

Associated Press Chairman Dean Singleton announced on Monday that the AP will be on the lookout for unlicensed sites using its content and will not hesitate to take legal action against unauthorised news aggregators, InformationWeek reported.

"We can no longer stand by and watch others walk off with our work," Singleton said in a statement. Licenses have been issued by the AP to search engines such as Google and Yahoo, unlike many newspapers, which have yet to authorise similar news aggregation. The AP is owned by member newspapers.
"As part of the initiative, AP will develop a system to track content distributed online to determine if it is being legally used. AP President Tom Curley said the initiative would also include the development of new search pages that point users to the latest and most authoritative sources of breaking news," according to the AP statement.

The New York Times spoke with AP executives, who clarified that the measures were not meant to be taken in order to target news aggregators such as The Huffington Post, but aimed at larger companies such as Google, with a view to guarantee that the AP is paid for the use of its material, according to InformationWeek.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-07 11:48

Internet advertising slowed considerably in the fourth quarter in major markets in the United States and Britain, and in some cases stopped completely, The New York Times reported.

The U.S. saw a slight increase from US$6 billion in Internet ad revenue in 2007 to $6.1 billion at the end of last year. Britain saw its online ad revenue growth begin to decrease as well. The trend in declining online ad sales hasn't been seen since the dot-com era bust.

Adam Smith, a director at the media company GroupM, told The New York Times that despite an overall expected growth of 6.7 percent this year, we should not expect anything like the increases in spending of 30 percent that were standard a few years back.

The drop in ad revenue is disappointing to some, who thought the global recession would lead to a shift towards online advertising, whose success and traffic is easier to track.

As Rupert Murdoch pointed out in a speech last week, search advertising on sites such as Google is still profitable. The New York Times article states that "In the second half of 2008, nearly 60 percent of online ad spending went to search engines".

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-06 11:23

News Corp. Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch told the cable industry Thursday that the proliferation of free online content will hinder the success of newspapers' online business models, Dow Jones reported.

Murdoch pointed out that "nobody is making money with free content on the Web except search" and expressed skepticism with regard to newspapers' use of companies like Google to aggregate their content without compensation.

"Should we be allowing Google to steal our copyrights?" asked Murdoch, and continued, "If you have a brand like The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal you don't have to." News Corp. owns Dow Jones and The Wall Street Journal.

Murdoch also speculated that newspapers would eventually have to charge for access to their online news. Murdoch said newspapers are "never going to make money on an advertising model to replace what they're losing," referring to an increasing catalogue of display advertising on the Internet, Dow Jones reported in an article posted by CNN.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-03 16:32

The Huffington Post has revealed plans to fund an investigative journalism unit, AFP reported. With an initial budget of US$1.75 million, Ariana Huffington, founder huffingtonpost.com, said the unit is an attempt to prevent the media's role in democracy becoming a victim of the newspaper industry's financial crisis.

"As the newspaper industry continues to contract, one of the most commonly voiced fears is that serious investigative journalism will be among the victims of the scaleback... All who recognise the indispensable role good journalism plays in our democracy are looking for ways to preserve it during this transitional period for the media," Huffington told AFP.

"The pieces developed by the Fund will range from long-form investigations to short breaking news stories and will be presented in a variety of media, including text, audio and video." Huffington plans to make all the fund's output freely available to outlets, recognising the "open source spirit of the Web."

The project will be based in Washington under Nick Penniman, who founded The American News Project. Current funding is expected to be enough to support 10 investigative reporters, and Huffington has said she aims to use journalists who have been laid off to work with freelancers on stories focusing on the U.S. economy.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-31 11:12

A recent Pew survey shows that online journalists are more optimistic about their careers than those in more traditional media fields, yet they are concerned about the quality of journalism online even more than they are concerned about finding a profitable business model. Findings published on the Pew Research Center's site were collected in a survey of members of the Online News Association (ONA).

Many professionals believe the Internet is "changing the fundamental values of journalism," and taking it in the wrong direction. However, the majority of those surveyed were reticent to disapprove of the progress of online media, and confident that the news form would find a way of generating revenue, despite disappointing trends in advertising returns.

An overall sense of compromise in the realm of standards, values and accuracy with regard to journalism was reported by those surveyed.

About two-thirds of the online journalists said they believed the future business model for online content rests with advertising, predicting that most revenue would come from ads in three years. Twenty-five percent, however, believed a new revenue model would be relied on, the study stated.

Pew's study was the first to target members of the ten-year-old ONA, the largest association of online media professionals. Almost 300 people were surveyed.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-31 10:23

The Seattle Times Co. plans to help Hearst Corp. transition its folded Seattle Post-Intelligencer into the online-only seattlepi.com format, Editor & Publisher reported Friday.

The Times Co. has agreed to provide "consulting and transition services" to Hearst Corp. under terms of a document terminating their joint operating agreement (JOA). Seattlepi.com launched on Wednesday, and will receive consultation services from Times Co. for 30 days.

Hearst and The Seattle Times Co. have also agreed not to sue each other in regard to any issues related to their joint operating agreement. The JOA also stipulates that no money will change hands between former partners and that the Times Co. keeps 60 percent of revenue remaining after expenses for all non-newsroom expenses.

Although the exact services The Times Co. will provide remain unknown, an article in the Seattle Times said the paper had run the Web site's business operations under the JOA.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-20 15:59

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