Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


Online content

Newspapers that have recently made the shift to publishing online content saw positive results in recent Nielsen data studying April's uniques in the United States, Editor & Publisher reported Sunday.

While the data puts NYTimes.com in the number one spot, followed by WSJ.com in second, recently launched online editions of the Detroit News and Detroit Free Press (number 25 on the top 30), saw rises in visits by 32 and 74 percent, respectively.

This month also saw Seattlepi.com make its return to the top 30 list (at number 29), the data shows.

Finishing off the top five in the list are USATODAY.com at number three, followed by washingtonpost.com and LA Times.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-18 09:35

The Salt Lake Tribune will begin to charge for some online content, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. The decision comes after the Tribune's parent company, MediaNews Group, said putting its print content on the Web for free is "an injustice to paying subscribers and creates perceptions that printed news and information have no value."

In a memo sent to employees by MediaNews Group, the company explained it will be making a shift from putting all printed content online to offering "premium" online content that differs from the print edition.

MediaNews President Jody Lodovic, said the company's strategy is "about creating a different audience online (and)...about creating options for people getting their news in different ways."

There is no launch date or consumer cost projection for the plan as of yet, although it is speculated that "bundle" packages could be offered, such as a combined online and print package, involving reduced printing and home delivery schedules, The Tribune reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-15 10:22

The U.S.-based company Kachingke is proposing a "half-way house" solution to generating income from online content AllMediaScotland reported.

Amidst a mounting debate over whether online content should be paid for, Kachingle is offering a way for sites to make up for insufficient ad revenue by inviting users to pay a minimal monthly subscription to sites bearing the Kachingle logo. In turn, sites displaying the company's logo are compensated by Kachingle on a monthly basis, according to the number off subscribing users that visit their site.

Sites posting the logo are eligible for remuneration only if subscribing users click on Kachingle's "medallion" logo, as a way of verifying that the content is worthy of financial compensation, according to AllMediaScotland.

The launch of the programme has been delayed following a overwhelming response and interest on the part of newspaper publishers. Cynthis Typaldos, the founder of Kachingle, explained the company "needed to make sure our initial system could scale to hundreds of thousands of active users" before launching, AllMediaScotland reported.

Typaldos said "hundreds of content sites have 'applied' to be part of the launch." Interested parties include outlets such as cable TV, public broadcasting, newspapers and blogs.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-15 10:20

Craigslist's "erotic services" sections will be eliminated and replaced with a new "adult" page. The posts there will be reviewed by company employees before publication, the Chicago Tribune reported.

Current erotic ads will be phased out of the site as they expire over the next seven days, which will put an end to what Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan calls "an Internet brothel" and "an illegal and dangerous place."

The agreement to discontinue the erotic services was reached after a meeting last Tuesday, when Madigan presented evidence that Craigslist's flagging system, intended to block inappropriate posts, was unsuccessful. Craigslist will now review posts to the adult section of the site, and reject any that propose illegal activities. The price to post on the site will also increase from US$5 to $10, with a $5 renewal fee, the Chicago Tribune reported.

"We are optimistic that the new balance struck today will be an acceptable compromise from the perspective of these constituencies, and for the diverse U.S. communities that value and rely upon Craigslist," the online classified site said in a statement.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-14 09:29

The New York Times on Tuesday unveiled its "Times Wire," an up to the minute live feed of the newspapers articles and blogs as they are published, AFP reported Wednesday.

Users of Times Wire can select which aspects of the newspaper's content the live feed will present to them, allowing the reader to focus on the topics of their choosing. The live feed will then link the reader to the nytimes.com article.

The Times Wire service also utilises an updated photo gallery.

Denise Warren, the general manager of NYTimes.com, described Times Wire as a way for the newspapers online service to, "meet our audiences' desire for quality news and information on demand" and to give users "a more personalized news experience," AFP reported.

According to Nielsen Online figures out last month, NYTimes.com is the leading U.S. newspaper Web site, with 20.1 million unique visitors for the month of March.

In addition to Times Wire, the newspaper also this week unveiled its newest application, Times Reader 2.0. The application allows the reader to download the daily newspaper in a more pleasant format than on the newspaper's Web site, as it allows users to access the downloaded newspaper without an Internet connection, according to AFP. It also provides unique online interaction opportunities, such as filling in the daily crossword on the screen.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-14 07:36

The Washington Post Co. is discussing possible collaboration with Google, the Post's media writer, Howard Kurtz, reported Monday.

In an article on the Post's Web site, Kurtz wrote that "Post Co. chief executive Donald Graham and Google chief executive Eric Schmidt and their lieutenants have been holding talks about collaboration. This could range from creating new Web pages to technological tools for journalists or readers. Hanging over the talks is the reality that the search giant, while funneling vital traffic to news sites, vacuums up their content without paying a dime."

The talks seem to be a reaction to Rupert Murdoch's assertion that only search engines like Google had found a way to make a profit off of free content.

Philip Bennett, an executive at the Post, said the discussions between the companies were focused on finding "improved ways of creating and presenting news online."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-12 13:44

London's Evening Standard will commemorate its new design by giving away 650,000 papers today, Press Gazette reported. The paper's makeover addressed both content and design, with a new masthead appearing on the front page, new writers on staff and a new editor, Geordie Greig, overseeing the paper.

The new Standard has also added a "trends" section which will be included in Monday editions. Greig said the paper plans to be "more upbeat, more representative and more positive."

The Standard is simultaneously launching its mobile Web site and a redesign of its main Web site, which will now integrate blogs, Twitter feeds and an expanded entertainment section.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-11 12:54

After implementing an experimental mixture of online and print formats, accompanied by a limited delivery schedule, the Detroit Free Press and Detroit News have seen a rise in readership of their e-edition, as well as less subscription cancellations than expected, Poynter Online reported.

An assessment of the Detroit papers' experiment reveals some heartening results, including an approximate 6,300 readers who choose to pay more to have the paper mailed to their homes on days that have been cut from the delivery schedule, about 30,000 visits per day to the papers' e-editions and a mere 50 percent of the projected subscription losses that actually took place - with new subscriptions being filled at impressive rates.

These optimistic findings could prove valuable as newspapers struggle to decide how to maintain profitability while providing both print and online news sources. In an interview with Poynter's Bill Mitchell, the Detroit Media Partnership's Janet Hasson pointed out that attention to advertisers was crucial to the success of the transition from print to online content, saying the Detroit papers "will achieve the savings we projected (from reduced newsprint and delivery costs) and we will achieve the circulation that we're committed to...but advertising is the wild card."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-04 15:48

A study done by USC's Annenberg School for Communications shows that readers of online newspapers spend an average of 53 minutes at a site, a record level among the centre's previous studies Chief Marketer reported. The findings of the Center for the Digital Future's study also mark an increase of 12 minutes from a similar survey done last year.

The researchers also found that 22 percent of online readers reported cancelling subscriptions to newspapers due to easily accessed online content.

Director for the center Jeffrey Cole said the findings show that "the decline of newspapers is happening at a pace they never could have anticipated" and added, "only those papers that can move decisively to the Web will survive."

Cole noted in a statement that the most "significant trend about how Americans are changing their news reading habits may be found in comparing the use of online media by light users versus heavy users," Editor & Publisher reported. "Heavy Internet users spent 65 more minutes per week reading online newspapers than do light readers."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-30 13:28

Fairfax Media, New Zealand's largest media company, will combine all of its publications into one online home as the Fairfax Media Digital Edition, the Taranaki Daily News reported Monday.

Fairfax Media publishes nine daily newspapers, the country's two national Sunday papers and more than 50 community newspapers around New Zealand. All the daily papers, the two Sunday editions, more than 30 of the community papers and real estate guides will be amalgamated on one Web site as Digital Edition.

The Digital Edition of the daily and the Sunday newspapers will be offered in 12 major foreign languages and will be able to read itself out loud. The company plans to offer these services to community editions in the near future.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-30 12:41

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