Date

Mon - 25.09.2017


Online content

William Reed Business Media has acquired Decision News Media, which publishes a variety online news sites geared for specific audiences, Journalism.co.uk reported.

Decision News Media runs 18 Web sites, including FoodNavigator.com, and several e-newsletters in the field of food and health, pharmaceutical and cosmetics.

Given the specificity of the online content, William Reed Business Media appears to be attempting to break into new demographics and markets with this acquisition. The move echos the company's purchase of Harper's food and drink title last year, according to Journalism.co.uk.

Co-founder of Decision News Media wrote on the company's site that "together, the two businesses will be stronger and have greater potential. We will accelerate our growth and expand our brands into new media areas."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-08 14:27

Bessemer City High School's newspaper has opted to publish exclusively online as a result of insufficient funding, the Gaston Gazette reported.

The North Carolina high school's students can now access their paper through the school's official site. Though online publication is in its early stages, the editors hope to produce monthly editions, and content would include news, games, and community events.

Fundraising ideas to help with the publication costs include selling space to advertisers and sponsors, as well as the high school staple: sales.

Though a bake sale for school funding seems outdated, the newspaper's adviser, Bessie Meeks, says the paper's various formats are "evolving," going from a four-page stapled edition, to being printed at a local press, to the introduction of the "new school" of newspaper publishing: online editions, according to the Gaston Gazette.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-08 13:02

After considering all options news Web sites have for monetizing online content, the American Press Institute announced in a white paper released last week that newspapers should embrace all of them, moving from "an advertising-centered to an audience-centered enterprise."

The Newspaper Economic Action Plan, released at a Chicago summit for newspaper executives, supports both subscriptions and micropayments, as well as a combination of the two, as advertising has proven to not be enough to support content creation, especially in the current global financial downturn, Poynter Online reported.

Last Thursday's meeting was not open to members of the press, however, according to an agenda of the meeting obtained by The Associated Press, it was called "Models to Lawfully Monetize Content."

According to Poynter, the report calls on newspaper executives to follow five "doctrines":

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-04 13:53

The Sunday Times plans to launch its own online edition, which could eventually charge for content, Media Guardian reported Wednesday.

Until now, Sunday Times content has appeared online along with its daily counterpart, The Times, under the title TImes Online. Though the launch date is uncertain, the new site would be devoted to the Sunday Times content only.

Decisions regarding payment plans and what content would be charged for are also not finalised; however, subscribers to the paper will not have to pay for access to online content.

The somewhat expected plans to institute payment plans comes after Rupert Murdoch, chairman and chief of the paper's parent company News Corporation, announced the company was "planning to introduce a pay model across all our properties but we will test it first on some of our stronger properties," according to Media Guardian.

James Murdoch, chairman and chief executive of News Corporation in Europe and Asia, said he expects the online editions will take about two years to recuperate on losses from falling advertising revenue from print editions.

"There are lots of ways we can make money from content over and above the advertising market" Murdoch said, describing the online publishing model as "malfunctioning," Media Guardian reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-04 13:49

CircLabs, a venture between the Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute and several media entrepreneurs,is planning to propose new technology that claims to help news organizations in both obtaining loyal readers and introducing tiered payments, Paid Content reported.

A mixture of online content and social media, the technology will offer targeted advertising and news, all the while respecting user privacy with what CircLabs co-founder and principal Bill Densmore called "stringent protections".

The project, called "Circulate" is set to be launched next year. CircLabs says it is in talks with potentail partners, including the AP, but no official deals with news organizations have been announced as of yet.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-28 09:29

Following a protest by female Saudi journalists in response to an offensive report appearing in an online newspaper, the Saudi Ministry of Information is exploring the possibility of regulating online news sources, Zawya reported.

The regulations are said to include controls over electronic media that stipulate the sites apply for official permits issued by the Ministry of Information. Owners and editors of the newspapers would also be required to include their names on their site.

The "Anti-electronic newspaper" movement gained support after 13 Saudi newspapers pressed charges of defamation and libel against an online newspaper that published an article accusing female journalists in Riyadh of engaging in unproffesional relations with senior members of local papers.

The board of directors of the Saudi Journalists Association plans to speak with concerned authorities about forming a set of regulations aimed at controlling electronic media.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-27 08:59

The Pantagraph newspaper, which is owned by Lee Enterprise, has introduced social media options to its online content, a press release for the company reported.

MyPantagraph.com, which serves central Illinois, will allow visiters to "develop their own unique profile pages, 'friend' users with like interests, upload photos, publish their own blogs and comment on blogs posted by others" according to the press release.

Another area which will see increased interactive options is the Bridal Section, where advertisers and wedding planners can interface with marrying couples.

Jeff Herr, directo of interactive media for Lee Enterprise, said that the company has been researching social media platforms fro the last two years and added "along the way, we've discovered the secret path to radically increasing engagement with our local audiences and attracting an entirely new category of advertisers."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-25 09:56

A study conducted by the Pew Research Center found that increased use of online classified sites, including Craigslist, has lead to drops in classified ad revenue for newspapers, Cnet News reported.

The Pew Center reported that 49 percent of internet users claimed to use online classified sites, a 27 percent increase from 2005.

Growth in online classified sites corresponds with drops in newspaper's classified ad revenue, down from $19.6 billion in 2000 to $9.9 billion last year.

The Pew study addressed the role Craigslist, a giant among classified sites, played in the drop in revenue for newsspapers stating, "In March 2009, classified sites averaged 53.8 million unique visitors, up 7 percent from February. Craigslist had 42.2 million unique visitors in the month of March."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-25 09:15

Kankakee, Illinois' Daily Journal is now charging for its online content, The Associated Press reported Tuesday.

The online edition of the Journal is offered in a PDF format to subscribers of its print edition. While visitors can see the first few paragraphs of a story for free, they must pay to read articles in their entirety.

The Journal's managing editor, Susy Shultz, said the online edition also incorporated interactive elements, such as blogs and videos, the AP reported in an article posted by the Chicago Tribune.

Print subscription prices are set at US$181 per year, whereas the new online subscriptions will cost readers $155 a year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-20 09:03

The Memphis (Tennessee) Commercial Appeal's e-edition, called e-appeal, has shown an increase of 31 percent during a time of marked declines in readership throughout the industry, Poynter Online reported.

The paper's e-edition accounts for almost 40 percent of its total circulation, which is mostly made up of classrooms that subscribe to the online edition. The e-edition launched in September 2008.

The investment on the part of schools is due to what Karl Wurzbach, The Commercial Appeal's vice president of sales and marketing, described as "a decision to bite the bullet and tell the schools that effective the beginning of the 2008-2009 school year, the only way they could get NIE (Newspapers in Education) copies was digitally."

As a result, the price of papers was reduced and 70,000 to 80,000 readers have been counted in middle schools and high schools, Poynter reported.

The e-edition is offered in PDF form, which makes it easy to print and e-mail stories and also incorporates interactive elements, including the choice to translate stories or listen to them using the audio option.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-19 15:24

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