Date

Mon - 25.09.2017


Online content

Although the first news service to report the sudden death of pop legend Michael Jackson was celebrity gossip site TMZ, using anonymous sources, technology writer Mike Elgan reported a fake news story had been created by a non-existent news service, Global Associated News, even before. Also before TMZ broke the story, Twitter users began linking to the fake story at more than 10 per second for more than half an hour, with Twitter co-founder Biz Stone saying the microblogging site "saw an instant doubling of tweets per second the moment the story broke," which slowed Twitter and at times, even caused it to stop working, PC World reported.

"I can't prove it, but I think TMZ fell for the hoax, hundreds or thousands of news organisations all over the world linked to the TMZ story, but then the fake story became real when Jackson died nearly an hour later," Elgan stated.

Graphic: Akamai Net Usage Index: News

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 21:53

A research report published by BabyCenter finds that mothers with young children are spending an increasing amount of time on social media sites and less time reading magazines and newspapers, Media Week reported.

The Center's report, which relied on information gathered through a variety of surveys answered by 25,000 participants, found a 52 percent increase in mothers who claimed to frequent social media sites compared to a study conducted in 2006.

Newspaper readership also seems to be on the decline with regards to this particular demographic; 46 percent of respondents to surveys said they read newspapers less after the birth of their child.

BabyCenter's chairman and global president TIna Sharkey commented on this finding saying, "In just a few years, we think moms using social media will eclipse those that are using newspapers."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 16:56

A Washington Post article that was only published online has left paying readers of the paper's print edition feeling angry and underserved, The New York Times reported.

The article, which recounted the unsolved murder of a Washington, D.C. lawyer, was published on the Post's online edition May 31 and June 1. Its online-only appearance has stirred controversy and debate regarding how newspapers offering both online and print editions should serve their audiences.

While no rules are set in stone, it is widely agreed that longer, investigative journalism pieces should be published in print form, as a means of encouraging readers to pay for print editions. The Post's article, which counted 7,000 words, would be considered to fit into this category.

Another tactic to encourage readers to keep their subscriptions to print editions is by taking the opposite approach of the Post and printing exclusive articles in the print copy, only to post the articles online a few days later.

Nancy Barnes, editor of the Star Tribune, told The Times her paper uses this method "so that readers get something extra for buying the paper...it's more of a reward for our readers who subscribe."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-25 19:03

TruMedia Networks is set to launch their sports social media platform, TruFan, today. The site will assemble local sports fans and permit them to interact through posting and commenting on aggregated sports news DMNews reported.

TruMedia's CEO Rafe Anderson commented on the timeliness of the site given the growing gaps in local news coverage saying, "As local content becomes scarce, it will become more valuable."

The site will also allow users to upload videos, stream radio coverage of games, and access up-to-date information concerning their favorite teams. TruFan's business plan counts on revenue through merchandising, advertising, ticketing, blog sponsorships, and e-mail marketing.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-23 10:47

The Newspaper Licensing Agency (NLA) will include the regulation of hyperlinks to newspapers' online content as part of its licenses starting 1 September, Press Gazette reported.

The NLA, which oversees the use of online news stories by news monitoring services and PR companies, has said that the new license will concern "Web aggregator services...that forward links to newspaper Web sites and for press cuttings agencies undertaking this type of activity."

News International titles and the Financial Times will be the only papers to be excluded from the regulations imposed by the new license, which targets not only online news aggregators, but also copyright infringement through the distribution of copies and scans of printed articles.

The license is reported to vary depending on the type of organisation, taking into consideration factors such as how many employees the company has as well as the number of users it counts and the amount of newspaper clippings it circulates. Small companies are estimated to pay fees in the low hundreds of pounds range, while larger companies could pay up to 50,000 pounds, according to Press Gazette.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-22 10:01

Fox News Digital Network and the New York Daily News Online saw a 49 percent year-on-year increase in traffic last month, while the Huffington Post, which saw slight declines, remains a heavily visited site in a Nielsen study of May's top thirty news sites, Editor & Publisher reported.

The top five of the study are, in this order, MSNBC Digital Network, Yahoo! News, CNN Digital Network, AOL News, and NYTimes.com.

Both AOL News and NYTimes.com made the top five list despite seeing negative growth for the month of May, though NYTimes.com has disputed the study's findings, saying that Nielsen's figures don't match their internal data or that of other sources.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-19 09:59

Starting this week, Florida's Escambia County Commision will begin looking at an ordinance that will alter the process of auctioning off county property by stipulating that the bidding process take place online, rather than in the local newspaper NorthEscambia.com reported.

Traditionally, the announcement of land auctions was published in the form of a paid legal notice in the region's Pensacola News Journal. Pending the acceptance of the proposal by the Escambia Commision, all information regarding the auction and sale of county land will be posted on an auction site created and controlled by the county.

The site-which will reportedly resemble Ebay-will allow users to make their bids for surplus property online, with the winner of the auction being notified by e-mail once the bidding is over.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-15 07:57

The American Press Institute's latest report, the Newspaper Economic Action Plan, which consists of five new "doctrines" to help the industry survive troubled economic times, specifically addressed the importance of papers' engagement in social media, calling it "extremely valuable market research."

According to the API report, "newspapers can make the leap from an advertising-centered to an audience-centered enterprise," and Poynter Business Analyst Rick Edmonds tells newspapers they "should get on with it immediately."

Bill Mitchell, also of Poynter Online asked News & Record editor John Robinson how newspapers can follow the report's doctrine to "become part of the social web."

Robinson said he agrees with the API's insistence on adopting and integrating social media, which he said have created improvements within his own paper, as the News & Record takes advantage of feedback, tips, and points of view offered by Twitterers and other social media users.

Reticent social media users should consider the practice a "development opportunity," Robinson told Mitchell. "Learning the social networking skills and establishing that online presence is an investment in your future."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-12 09:40

USA Today's electronic edition will offer content for a fee, according to the paper's newly named publisher, David Hunke, The Associated Press reported.

The e-edition will be delivered to paying subscribers by e-mail beginning in early August. Although a fee will be charged for the electronic edition, Hunke maintains that access to USA Today's main Web site will remain free.

Hunke's payment plan is also focused on testing to see if "mobile applications" such as iPhone apps may be features readers are open to paying for.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-11 20:42

The Newport Daily News is experimenting with a previously untested approach to charging for online content - the cost of an Internet only subscription will be more than the subscription to the newspaper's print version, the Nieman Journalism Lab reported Monday.

The newspaper plans to plug the paper-and-ink format by making it more financially attractive than the online equivalent, while bringing in cash from those who are forced to use the online version. The Rhodes Island 12,000-strong circulation paper is published in a traditional afternoon edition on weekdays and a morning edition on Saturdays.

"Our goal was to get people back into the printed product," publisher Albert K. Sherman, Jr. told Niemen's Edward J. Delaney in an interview. "Why would they pay for it on the Internet when they can go buy the printed paper? And that's perfect - that's what we want."

The new "three-tier pricing structure" charges subscribers US$145 a year for home delivery of the print version, $245 for home print delivery and online access, and a steep $345 for the online access to the duplicate of the print edition only. However, some information, such as obituaries and wedding announcements, will remain free.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-09 17:15

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