Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Online content

NewsCred launched in 2008 aiming to use algorithms combined with users' votes to rank news sources by credibility. That didn't work out, and the site is now manoeuvring in another direction, this time offering users a platform to build professionally-looking customised online newspaper sites in just minutes, TechCrunch reported last week.

Users can pick topics they are interested in or choose from a list of categories provided. The stories are then drawn from popular news sites and blogs, aggregated and listed in their appropriate sections.

The news customisation space is already very competitive, and at the top are online giants like Google. Other more "directly competitive" sites include Meehive, according to TechCrunch.

However, NewsCred has something its competitors don't - a unique feature that allows users to put their spin on the news with an "Editorial" section, in which customised news streams are placed next to a blogging element where users can write their own content. The customised newspaper can be shared via Twitter or e-mailed directly from the site, The Next Web reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-01-20 23:21

Forty-four percent of people using Google News said they only scan the headlines and don't actually go on to the news sites themselves, according to a survey of online U.S. news consumers by research firm Outsell, paidContent reported today. And the more a user checks the news on Google News - "power news users," or those who checks more than twice daily - the less likely they are to click on a news link.

This study is expected to "provide further ammunition" to content creators who charge aggregators with not sharing ad revenue they make on providing links to news articles, Agence France-Presse noted.

Google points out that its News service sends billions of clicks to news sites each month. A spokesman told paidContent that the online search giant only shows "enough for users to identify the stories they're interested in - a headline, a short snippet and a link to the publisher's site - and we direct users to those news sites to read the stories."

Ken Doctor, an analyst for Outsell, said in a statement that although Google is driving traffic to newspapers, "it's also taking a significant share away."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-20 01:16

The Miami Herald yesterday began trying a new way to make money from online content: by asking nicely. The McClatchy-owned Florida newspaper now accepts voluntary payments on its Web site at the end of each story, where readers are presented with an option to make a payment to support the coverage.

After clicking on the option, readers are directed to a page where they can pay any amount they like, via credit card.
But will readers pay?

The majority of reader comments under The Herald's announcement voice support for the move, stating "I think most people realize the importance of having a daily local paper and would pay something to support it," and "We all love it when a Miami Herald investigation exposes corrupt politicians and the like. That costs money."

However, readers also said that even though they support the idea, they doubt people will willingly offer up cash.

Elissa Vanaver, a vice president at The Herald, yesterday told The Associated Press that some readers have already donated. She also said there is no timeline for this plan.

"...We don't have a phase two or three or four yet. We want to see what trying this tells us about the market," she said.

Other newspapers are mulling the voluntary pay option, but The Herald is the first to try it out, Geneva Overholser, director of the USC Annenberg School of Journalism, told the AP.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-16 22:35

The BBC, which yesterday announced a new initiative to grant the general public access to professional media training resources, has also revealed it will expand the content available on its news website by linking to rival sources via an aggregation-like system, reports The Independent.

The move comes after accusations headed by News Corp's chairman and CEO for Europe and Asia, James Murdoch, that the corporation, in choosing to remain free, is flooding the market and preventing competitors from expanding online and charging for their content. The new plan would reportedly see links to commercial Web sites added at the end of BBC stories.

For more on this story, visit our sister site, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-15 17:16

Italian media group Gruppo Editoriale L'Espresso's chairman has announced his support for daily business newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore, which last week ran an article by Google CEO Eric Schmidt. The argument between the press and Google on how much control should be leveraged over content has escalated throughout 2009, and Carlo De Benedetti wrote in an editorial Wednesday that "the problem is that in today's media world there's an obvious imbalance in Google's favour."

Il Sole 24 Ore was right to offer readers Schmidt's point of view, because much of the future of the news depends on the relationship between news content providers and Google, he stated, calling the launch of Google's First Click Free policy "more a diversion than a change of strategy."

"Big G is gearing itself to give every user, everywhere and at all times everything he needs, beginning with the news. In this way, newspapers become only one of Google's many content providers. And since big advertising is linked to other keywords and not to the news, as Google's CEO so aptly explains, who'll pay for the work of editorial and publishing staff?" De Benedetti wrote.

He goes on to state:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-11 23:04

If newspaper or magazine content online was no longer free, 80 percent of consumers say they would not pay for access, a new Forrester Research report has found.

The remaining respondents who were willing to pay are split on how to pay: 8 percent said they would prefer a subscription for all online content, and another 8 percent said they would like one subscription to cover print, online and mobile. Three percent, meanwhile, said they would prefer to pay per article.

Because not everyone can agree on whether - or how - to pay, it's clear that giving consumers a choice, from free content to different types of paid content, may be the way to go, suggests Forrester's Sarah Rotman Epps.

"There's no one delivery platform, and no one pricing model, that will satisfy all consumers," she writes.

Meanwhile, almost 50 percent of North American editors have said they doubt paid content is the only answer, the American Press Institute reported in September. The API urged publishers look to the five-point plan put forth earlier this year by the Newspaper Association of America. The five points involve "doctrines" respecting true value, fair use, fair share, digital development and consumer-centric practices.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-19 23:45

By all accounts, it was a red-letter day for the Wall Street Journal.

First, Reuters reported that the newspaper's digital division would be launching a specialty product, providing premium subscribers more specialised news in niche areas than the regular paper already delivers. Then, Editor & Publisher listed the newspaper's online edition as having drawn the second most unique visitors in September among all U.S. newspapers.

The number of uniques seemed especially notable given the Wall Street Journal's Web site has a partial paywall, as well as its recent announcement it will be implementing paywalls on its mobile site, even for subscribers. However, a closer look at wsj.com's fee structure revealed that mobile phone users who sign up before Saturday may yet preview the Journal for free through January. This window of unpaid opportunity likely accounts for the spike in first-time visitors to the site.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-21 18:26

News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch has increasingly pushed for paid online content, and last week announced that in the next fiscal year, the media conglomerate will continue to see advertising revenues dwindle. In its place, he said, consumers will be asked to pay for high quality journalism, all while trying to put a stop to "plagiarists and aggregators" of News Corp. content, The Age reported Sunday.

Using the News. Corp.-owned Wall Street Journal, as well as The Times and Sunday Times in the United Kingdom as evidence quality online content can succeed, Murdoch said he believes online subscription-based news "consumers will reward us with their loyalty for years to come and we will ultimately be able to better tailor our offerings to them while building new business models and generating more revenue."

In fiscal year 2010, News Corp.'s advertising revenues will account for "significantly less" of the overall revenue pie, a trend that will accelerate in years to come, he said, the Brisbane Times reported.

According to ABC News, Murdoch recently referred to search engine companies like Yahoo! and Google as "content kleptomaniacs."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-19 15:12

A new poll conducted by paidContent:UK and Harris Interactive showed most consumers are resistant to paying for online newspapers, the Guardian reported.

However, the study also found one possible hope for publishers: print and online may work in tandem. Only 5 percent of respondents who read a news site at least once a month would pay for online access. However, if a free or discounted printed paper subscription is provided, that number was up to a combined 48 percent.

Although the proportion of people who are not willing to pay still remains a majority, it's only a slight win - "it seems the printed edition could leverage online subscriptions; not just among existing readers of the paper, but also among those who don't already buy it," paidContent:UK reported.

This data shows most people think physical products should have tangible economic value, while digital content is expected to be cheaper.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-28 17:23

Hollywood trade newspaper Variety will begin charging for access to portions of its online content, its publisher revealed on Thursday and The Associated Press reported today.

Starting early next year, access to exclusive content and new features will require annual paid subscription, a move that publisher Brian Gott says is necessary to maintain economic feasibility.

"It's getting ahead of something that inevitably will happen and creating a business strategy around maintaining the viability of being a paid product," Gott said, according to the AP.

The move will provide insight into the potential for niche publications to charge their audiences for specialised online content. The newspaper's main rival, The Hollywood Reporter, has not made any plans to change access costs to its Web site that is currently predominantly free, but keeps 45-day old archives and film shooting schedules for paying subscribers only. The Hollywood Reporter is a privately held publication of The Nielsen Co.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-18 20:44

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