Date

Sun - 24.09.2017


Northcliffe Media

Over the weekend The New York Times former executive editor and current columnist Bill Keller fell victim to an elaborate Internet hoax. An opinion piece titled “WikiLeaks, A Post Postscript,” supposedly a follow-up to an article written by Keller in February of this year, was shared through a Twitter account that appeared to belong to Keller and swiftly re-tweeted by journalists, including The Guardian’s Dan Gilmore and the NYT’s own technology correspondent Nick Bilton. Readers were initially fooled by the visual similarities between the fake article and Keller’s regular column. In addition, the advertisements featured on the page were genuine, and all links connected to nytimes.com. On closer inspection, the lack of The New York Times favicon next to the web page’s URL, and the fact that the domain name differs from that used for real NYT op-ed pieces indicated that the article was a fake.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-30 17:41

Say what you like about Rupert Murdoch (and in the aftermath of the phone-hacking scandal, people often do) there’s no denying that his decisions continue to influence the world of media business. A week after News Corp announced that it is to separate his publishing interests from its other businesses, analysts have begun to question whether other media conglomerates ought to follow suit. Today’s Financial Times reports that questions are being asked as to whether Daily Mail and General Trust (DMGT) would benefit from taking similar action.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-05 17:05

After enduring a seven-year decline that has resulted in well over £1bn in ad revenue bleeding out of regional newspapers, Daily Mail & General Trust last week hoisted the white flag over any ambition to be a long-term player in the embattled sector. The publisher admitted it is keen to offload Northcliffe Media, home to more than 100 daily and weekly regional titles from Hull to Bath, and has no desire to put "fresh capital" in and lead what it views as a necessary large-scale consolidation in the sector.

Continue reading on guardian.co.uk

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-14 16:51

The Daily Mail & General Trust-owned Local People network plans to double the number of websites in its network and expand its reach, MediaWeek.co.uk reported today.

These hyperlocal UK websites are aimed at boosting better interaction in small communities by allowing users to create profiles, rate and review local businesses, upload images and text, form groups and message each other. "Our focus is providing small businesses a way of reaching a really local audience, Roland Bryan, managing director of Local People, told PressGazette.co.uk. "The targeted nature of our sites means that our advertisers can achieve this with low wastage."

This move follows the recent redesign and rollout of some of the local people websites like Bideford People, Falmouth People and Clifton People, with a simpler homepage and integration of Twitter-style news feeds facilitating users to post comments, reviews, reply to comments and rate content, MediaWeek reported. With strong infrastructural support to grow to 1,000 websites and multi-language capability, the local community website plans to build its brand in the coming months through a combination of local marketing events and social media engagement, along with digital marketing efforts and brand campaigns.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-16 00:05

Two UK regional papers, Bristol's Western Daily Press and Plymouth's Western Morning News, announced they will merge editors and senior editorial roles, BBC News reported.

The two papers will remain unique, but have only one editor-in-chief. Production will be shared between Plymouth and Bristol, but the reporting teams will remain independent, The Herald reported.

This move could impact up to 20 jobs in Devon and 11 posts in Bristol.

Sales of Western Daily have dropped by 10 percent to about 34,000 last year, while Western Morning News' sales have decreased by about 6.5 percent to just over 35,000.

Both titles are produced by regional media group, Northcliffe.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-09 19:19

Northcliffe Media title Sevenoaks Chronicle has escaped relocation, a possible consequence of the UK group's cost cutting maneuvers, Holdthefrontpage.co.uk reported Monday.

The newspaper will continue to operate from the town of Kent after Northcliffe's plan to move staff to Tunbridge Wells was cancelled. The proposed move was a small part of the media group's extensive cost-cutting plans, including a number of redundancies, the coalescence of publications and construction of a central subbing hub for the group's South East Weeklies division in Chelmsford.

Newspapers in Essex, Kent, Sussex and Surrey will be impacted by the actions.

"It is clear that the Chronicle has a special place within the Sevenoaks community and our parent company decided we didn't want to do anything to affect that," said Chronicle Community Editor Ian Read. "It's great that our reporters are still based in the heart of the community."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-08 19:18

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