Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


non-profit

The Poynter Institute – the Florida-based journalism institution “dedicated to teaching and inspiring journalists and media leaders” – is suffering from a lack of cash, the Tampa Tribune reported on Saturday.

Poynter’s finances have been hit by a double whammy, the article suggests. Up until now, the Institute has been partially funded by dividends from the Tampa Bay Times, a for-profit paper that it owns. Now, however, due to sinking revenues in the news industry, Poynter says this model of funding is “no longer viable by itself.”

Secondly, the Tampa Tribune writes that, due to the same financial problems, Poynter has been making less money from its training programs. “Fewer news organizations can afford to send staff to Poynter for classes — eroding the tuition base,” states the article.

To counter these losses, Poynter is looking to massively boost the amount money that it receives from philanthropy. The Institute posted an advert last April for a new President of the Poynter Foundation, an entity created by the Poynter Institite in March to “identify and develop new resources.” The future president is expected to “create, design and implement a comprehensive development plan that will increase, diversify and sustain philanthropic giving.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-04 14:35

Financially speaking, this seems to have been a mixed week for the LA Times. On the one hand, Fishbowl LA reported on Tuesday that the LA Times Magazine, which has been running for almost three years in its current form, will shut down next month due to a tough market. On the other, the LA Times announced this Thursday that it has received $1m of funding from the Ford Foundation to strengthen its reporting of beats including immigration, minority communities and Brazil.

First to the bad news. Fishbowl LA quotes the editor of the LA Times Magazine, Nancie Clare, who attributes the closure to a lack of funds. “I think it’s fair to say there were revenue issues,” says Clare, “it’s still a tough economic climate, especially for print. I don’t think they got rid of us because they don’t like us.” Fishbowl LA writes that the monthly magazine’s seven staff will be laid off, and there’s “no indication” that jobs in other parts of the newsroom will be made available to them. “They’re contracting in the newsroom too. There’s nowhere to absorb us,” says Clare, quoted in the article.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-18 15:14

You can’t reduce journalism to a simple formula. But if you had to try, a pretty good guess might be “good content + effective distribution = success.”

A new partnership announced between Digital First Media and ProPublica fits well into the equation. As part of the deal, ProPublica will provide Digital First Media with pre-publication access to its news apps, which in the past have taken the form of easily searchable databases of information in the public interest, such as Dollars for Docs, which allows users to see how much money their doctor has accepted from pharmaceutical companies. Digital First Media will then be able to use the content of these apps as a basis for stories at different publications across its large network of local newspapers.

Yet it would be an inaccurate undersell to say that ProPublica is simply providing information and Digital First Media sharing it. Digital First Media journalists won’t simply be distributing the data, they should be building on it to create stories that show its specific local relevance.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-22 18:39

The Chicago News Cooperative announced officially today that it will be suspending its contributions to The New York Times. As of next Sunday, the Chicago organisation will no longer submit articles to The New York Times Midwest pages or to its website.

In a blog post announcing the change, CNC's CEO and editor James O'Shea writes that he takes "full responsibility for this situation". He laments that "unlike similar start-up efforts like the Texas Tribune in Austin, the Bay Citizen in San Francisco and ProPublica in New York, we never recruited the kind of seven figure donations from people of means concerned about the declining quality of news coverage around the country."

Rather than saying that the CNC will close down entirely, O'Shea writes that "in the coming days and weeks, we will be examining our potential to see if we can identify an alternative path and preserve some of the journalistic assets we have developed."

O'Shea writes that the CNC's decision to suspend publication "was motivated by some complex factors and unresolved questions regarding our tax status and a change in circumstances that triggered questions about the economic wisdom of commitments between the CNC and The New York Times."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-21 13:12

The Global Mail, a non-profit news site that aims to "deliver original, fearless, independent journalism", has launched in Australia this morning, reports Journalism.co.uk.

The Global Mail is funded by philanthropist Graeme Wood, founder of the accommodation website wotif.com. Wood has donated over $15 million to the new publication, which should be enough to support the site through its first 5 years, says editor-in-chief Monica Attard.

Attard, a former broadcast journalist for ABC, said in an interview with The Australian that there will be a separation between the site's benefactor and its editorial content. "Graeme is chairperson of The Global Mail board. He has no editorial input whatsoever," she asserts.

The Global Mail lists two other board members on its website: Saad Mohseni, Chairman and CEO of MOBY, a media company based in Afghanistan with interests in the Middle East, and Jenny Wheatley, a chartered accountant.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-06 15:22

Under the heading "necessity is the mother of invention," investigative reporting nonprofits have popped up like journalists at a magazine-sponsored soiree offering free hors d'oeuvres and alcohol.

Using industry-renowned editors and staffers, the nonprofits take on in-depth investigations that newspapers no longer have the time or the staff to conquer. The larger nonprofits generally report on any number of public policy issues with the goal of exposing wrongs and making corporations and institutions -- governmental and nongovernmental -- accountable.

Continue reading in Editor & Publisher

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-27 10:10

Nonprofit news sites make up a growing niche in the Web news ecosystem. These sites, big and small, are gaining national attention with their investigative journalism and all are learning one elemental rule: Even in the world of nonprofit news, you need to think entrepreneurially to survive.

Continue reading on NetNewsCheck

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-08 09:32

The Chicago News Cooperative was launched in October 2009, by James O'Shea, former editor-in-chief of the Lost Angeles Times and former managing editor of the Chicago Tribune. Many people were worried about the state of news in Chicago, O'Shea told World Editors Forum study tour participants, at a time when the Chicago Sun-Times was coming out of bankruptcy, and the Tribune was on the brink of it. He came up with the idea to launch a cooperative that would charge people a small fee to be part of a common interest network, inspired by social networking sites.

These news interest networks might be based around politics, arts, theater, or science, for example, and would connect readers with those with similar interests.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-03 16:43

Beginning this week ProPublica began using the Press+ e-commerce online platform from Journalism Online in hopes of increasing reader donations.

When users click on a ProPublica page, they may see a Press+ message asking them to consider making a donation to help fund the organisation's investigative journalism. At the same time, Press+ isn't the only way to donate. Users can also contribute directly to the organisation.

Journalism Online was launched in April 2009 by Steven Brill, Gordon Crovitz and Leo Hindery. It aims to create an online payment system that many publishing companies could use to make paying for online content simpler for both readers and publishers. The James S. and James L. Knight Foundation began using the Press+ system for 10 non-profit journalism sites in September

In an interview with Shaping the Future of the Newspaper last summer, Brill said that as a lecturer of a journalism course at Yale University, he suddenly became conscious of the talented young people he was sending into a profession ready to implode "because a bunch of publishers made a crazy decision to give everything away for free."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-25 16:37

Google Inc has given $2 million to the Knight Foundation, it was announced yesterday, and the search giant has said it will invest $3 million more in journalism projects outside the US, "through a similar partnership." More details will be available early next year, according to a post on Google's blog by Nikesh Arora, president, Global Sales Operations and Business Development.

The money to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is intended to support the foundation's digital media innovation work, and half will go to the Knight News Challenge, while the remaining $1 million will to other grants around news innovation which will be announced later.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-28 00:26

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation