Date

Thu - 23.11.2017


Nielsen

The unique audience for online search in the United States grew from less than 100 million in February 2003 to more than 140 million in February 2009, up 50 percent, according to the Nielsen Company. Member communities and e-mail also increased from about 60 million uniques to more than 100 million, with 87 percent and 76 percent six-year growth rates, respectively, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

The biggest gainer, however, is online video, which had an audience of less than 30 million unique users in February 2003. It surpassed email in November 2007, and had more than 100 million viewers in February 2009, up 339 percent within the six years.

In terms of time spent on each sector in the United States, e-mail was on top, and increased from less than six billion minutes in February 2003 to more than 20 billion minutes in February 2009, up 268 percent. Member communities accounted for about two billion minutes, and jumped to more than 20 billion and exceeded e-mail in February 2009, up 883 percent, according to the Nielsen Company.

Search accounted for about 2.5 billion minutes, and increased to about six billion in 2009, a growth of 193 percent.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-19 18:00

Will consumers pay for online news and entertainment contents that are now free? According to a recent Nielsen survey which covered more than 27,000 consumers across 52 countries, 85 percent said they would like free content remain free, the latest SFN's report, New Revenue Models for Newspaper Companies, reported.

The survey was conducted during the autumn of 2009, covering nations in five geographical regions, including the Asia Pacific region, Europe, Middle East/Africa/Pakistan (MEAP), Latin America and North America.

When asked if free online content should remain free, the majority (85 percent) of all the respondents said they strongly agree or agree, while only a small group expressed their disagreement, according to the Nielsen report "Changing Models: A Global Perspective on Paying for Content Online," released in February 2010.

To break down by region, Latin Americans had the highest percentage of respondents saying they "agree" or "strongly agree," with more than nine out of 10 saying so.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-24 22:08

In January 2009, entertainment was the online category with the highest reach in the six countries surveyed, reaching more than eight out of 10 people, except in Australia, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

Other than in Switzerland, the entertainment audience grew in all countries. The increase was in double digits in Spain, Brazil and the United Kingdom, according to the Nielsen Company.

News and information had the second highest reach - more than 66 percent in all the countries, and more than 75 percent in the United States, United Kingdom and Spain.

Annual audience growth was especially high in Spain, Brazil and the United Kingdom, at more than 20 percent.

Current events and global news, as well as videos/movies reached more than half of the population, except in Switzerland, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-10 21:47

Will consumers pay for online news and entertainment contents that are now free?

According to a recent Nielsen survey which covered more than 27,000 consumers across 52 countries, 85 percent said they would like free content remain free. However, when asked based on specific types of content, survey participants are more likely to at least consider paying for particular categories, especially if they have ever done so, the research company said in a blog post.

Will Pay / Won't Pay

Online content for which consumers are most willing to pay, or have already paid, are those which are usually paid-for offline, such as movies, music, games and current television shows. They always cost a lot to produce.

Consumers are least likely to pay for what is "essentially homegrown online," which is produced at fairly low cost, including social communities, podcasts, consumer-generated videos and blogs.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-02-16 23:02

In December 2009, an average user spent more than five and half hours on social networking sites, up 82 percent compared to the same period one year ago. The overall traffic to social media sites has also boosted since December 2007, Media Post reported.

Social networks and blogs topped as the most popular online category in terms of average time spent in December worldwide, followed by online games and instant messaging.

Facebook was the leading global social networking site in December 2009 with 206.9 million unique visitors, or 67 percent of global social media users visiting the site.

Like the global pals, Americans are spending more time on social networking and blog sites - total minutes up 210 percent and the average time per capita up 143 percent year-over-year in December 2009.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-01-26 00:10

U.S. publication Editor & Publisher, which reports on the newspaper business, was sold Thursday to California magazine and newspaper publisher Duncan McIntosh Co. Inc., two weeks after its closure, E&P announced.

Nielsen Co. announced in December it would close E&P. Terms of the sale were not disclosed. "Newspapers, which are transforming beyond the printed page to all forms of digital media, simply could not lose the one place where the industry could have a conversation with itself and exchange ideas and best practices for navigating the uncertain waters ahead..." said Charles McKeown, who will continue on as publisher.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-15 19:57

Editor & Publisher will publish its January 2010 edition as planned, despite plans by Nielsen Co. to close the 125-year-old U.S. newspaper trade magazine, Editor Greg Mitchell announced yesterday.

However, despite the parent company's previous unsuccessful attempts to sell the publication, E&P announced that "a number of outside companies and individuals have expressed interest in possibly keeping E&P going, so stay tuned for updates."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-15 23:37

After searching for a buyer for the past year, Nielsen Business Media will shut down Editor & Publisher, NBM President Greg Farrar announced today.

The group has sold eight brands - Adweek, Brandweek, Mediaweek, The Hollywood Reporter, Billboard, The Clio Awards, Film Journal International and Backstage - to e5 Global Media Holdings, and has also decided to shutter its Kirkus Reviews, founded in 1933 to review school books, along with E&P. e5 Global Media Holdings was formed by Pluribus Capital Management and Guggenheim Partners.

"This move will allow us to strengthen investment in our core businesses - those parts of our portfolio that have the greatest potential for growth - and ensure our long-term success. We remain committed to building our trade show group and affiliated brands. These assets continue to be a key part of The Nielsen Company's overall portfolio and we strongly believe they are positioned to grow as the economy recovers. In addition, we'll continue to assess the strategic fit of our remaining portfolio of publications," Farrar wrote in a letter, posted by Romenesko.

The oldest U.S. journal to cover the newspaper industry, E&P was launched in 1901 when it merged with The Journalist magazine, which started in 1884.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-10 19:18

According to the Nielsen Company, minutes spent on online video in the United States were up from 12.6 billion minutes in February 2008 to more than 21.6 billion minutes in February 2009 - an increase of 71 percent. The number of videos streamed rose from 6.3 billion to 8.9 billion, up 41 percent from February 2008 to February 2009, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.


Unique viewers of online video in the United States in February 2008 totalled 115.8 million, and increased to 127.6 million one year later, up 10 percent, according to the Nielsen Company.

In February 2008, an average user streamed 54.7 videos and spent two minutes per stream.

The figures went up to 77.1 streams and 2.43 minutes per stream in February 2009, increases of 27 percent and 22 percent, respectively, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-10-09 22:23

Mobile Internet usage in the United States is up, mostly driven by smartphones like the iPhone, according to a Nielsen report. However, only about one out of four wireless subscribers logged onto the mobile Web in July, Media Week reported.

According to Nielsen, mobile Internet users accounted for 56.9 million in July, up 34 percent from 42.5 million last year.

However, another Nielsen report published in January pointed out that there were close to 225 million mobile subscribers in the U.S., which means only one-fourth of them use mobile Internet. It's still lower than PC Web usage and lagging far behind mainstream media such as TV.

Surprisingly, although many young urban adults and business travelers contributed to so many iPhones and Blackberry device purchases, it's teens and seniors whose usage has spiked, with a 45 percent and 67 percent surge in usage among teens 13-17 and users 65 and older, respectively, in July.

The mobile Web users still skews male (53 percent), but the number for women is growing fast. Nielsen said in July female users soared by 43 percent, compared to only a 26 percent growth among men, Media Week reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-10-02 18:43

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