Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


Newspaper

City A.M., the free morning daily for London's business community, has launched a new fund management section every Wednesday for the next three months, MarketingWeek reported Tuesday. This new section is sponsored by UK fund manager Artemis as a part of a recent deal with the newspaper.

The new fund management section is a part of the newspaper's investment section offering a forum for news and analysis of companies, capital market and commodities, along with 'London's Top 250,' a daily chart put together, based on market capitalisation and reports from activity in the London and New York markets, according to MarketingWeek.
A column called 'Market Matters' focusing on one or two medium-to-long term market themes, targeted at institutional investors is contributed by the managing director of Artemis, Dick Turpin, while other sections are contributed by two of City A.M's in-house specialists, Jessica Mead and Kathleen Brooks.

The new section will increase the depth of City A.M.'s investment coverage, while offering Artemis an ideal platform to reach to institutional investors, according to Allister Heath, editor of City A.M. Users can view, download and read the new section on the newspaper's Web site.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-15 14:25

Philadelphia Media Holdings LLC, parent company of the Daily News and Inquirer, announced at the Newspaper Advertising Association's mediaXchange conference in Orlando that it will launch a Daily News weekend edition in October, the Philadelphia Business Journal reported yesterday.

The new edition is "the result of over a year of creative thought and a great deal of research," said Brian Tierney, president and CEO of the Philadelphia Media Holdings LLC. "It won't be the regular Daily News published another day, rather a unique product with a review of the week behind and preview of the week ahead," Philly.com reported.

The Daily News won a Pulitzer prize for investigative reporting on Monday for a year long series that exposed tactics used by a police narcotics squad.

The weekend edition will be targeted to audiences in their 20s and 30s, who are looking for more entertainment, gossip, sports and political stories and are no longer loyal readers of the Sunday Inquirer, according to a memo by Tierney, posted on PoynterOnline. The talented Pulitzer winning editorial team will be working on the weekend edition, edited by Days.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-14 21:46

Newspaper and magazine publishers may be reluctant to jump on the iPad bandwagon, suggests ArsTechnica. Possible reasons include the 30 percent commission that Apple takes as well as the firm's policy of not sharing customer data.

Publishers view information about their subscribers as valuable since it may affect marketing plans and an outlet's content, the Financial Times (FT) reported.

We must keep the relationship with our readers," said Sara Öhrvall, senior vice-president of research at Swedish publishing group Bonnier. "That's the only way to make a good magazine."

Publishers may not agree with Apple handing out nearly a third of subscription sales over an undefined time frame. An anonymous media execute told the FT that 30 percent forever may change the economics.

A New York Times source said print circulation would determine the iPad edition, because it is viewed as "another way to distribute the paper," according to Gawker. This implies between US$20 to $30 per month, a price that may prevent readers from cancelling their print paper subscriptions. Meanwhile, those in charge of digital operations are prepared to charge around $10 per month for the iPad version.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-02-18 15:15

Creating a good brand is done through leadership, Ravi Dhariwal, CEO of Bennet, Coleman & Co., which publishes The Times of India told this afternoon's session of the World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad. Speakers discussed how their businesses make money, while remaining credible and effective and still incredibly popular - through print.

Dhariwal and his company have made The Times of India a brand rather than just a newspaper through extensive marketing and interactivity. Establishing The Times as a cheerleader for the country was a key part of this branding strategy, along with keeping it "virtually free" for everyone.

Publisher and Editor in Chief of the newly launched 'i,' a daily newspaper in Portugal, Martim Figueiredo, says the newspaper sees costs of about 8 million euro and 4.5 million euro in profits, and will lose nearly 3.5 million euros in its first year of operation. However, with the advertising and reader response so far and despite heavy challenges, he envisions a break-even in 2014. The newspaper is targeting a high class, sophisticated audience, which also appeals to advertisers.

"We are not so much worrying about our future; we'd like to think we are making our future. I couldn't find one publisher in Australia that would accept that its product is going to die." This was the message from Mark Hollands, CEO of PANPA (Pacific Area Newspaper Publishers' Association) in Australia.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-02 12:37

Colin Lin, 50, invites fellow couturiers the world over to brainstorm new uses for old newspapers, according to The Associated Press. The Taiwan-based designer has already come up with her own strategy: attach them to strips of cotton and weave them into shoes and bags that are ecofriendly as well as profitable.

"I only contribute very little to recycling all the newspapers dumped everyday around the world," Lin was quoted in today's AP article as saying. "But other footwear and bag manufacturers may want to copy my idea and so contribute their own share to dealing with the problem."

Apparently, some already have. The full wardrobe of a fashion show at Hainan University last October featured nothing but recycled newspaper clothing, as China View then reported.

Photo: AP, via Daily Press

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-20 15:34

An island newspaper went into receivership yesterday for failure to pay out a tort award of $191,000 (US$71,135), Caribarena reported today. Grenada Today, owned and operated by George Worme, had been ordered Thursday on appeal to establish a pay schedule with former prime minister Keith Mitchell by Tuesday or face liquidiation of its assets, according to The Gleaner.

The crippling libel award stems from a 2001 letter to the editor calling Mitchell corrupt and incompetent, The Associated Press reported yesterday. Despite the reader's published remark, Mitchell held his seat in public office from 1995 through 2008, according to CNW Telbec.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-28 18:38

The U.S. Olympic Committee is protesting an effort by the parent company of The Olympian, McClatchy Co., to trademark the newspaper's name, the Olympia, Washington newspaper reported Monday.

The Chicago Tribune observed that the move by USOC is "like the guy at the end of bar whose counter-argument to being called an angry drunk is always to start throwing punches."

USOC claims the newspaper's name infringes on the federally-protected use of the word Olympic, and most any derivation arising therefrom, in conjunction with its world games. A Seattle trademark lawyer notes that the specific legislation on which USOC relies to block McClatchy's claim also provides an exception for regional items not related to, and pre-existing, the games.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-06 18:09

The Internet is the only segment reporting a gain in share from 2006 to 2007, according to World Advertising Trends 2008, published by the World Advertising Research Centre.

The biggest gains happened in the United Kingdom and Sweden, where the Internet share went up 4.4 percent and 3.5 percent, respectively, in one year, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

Print media, including newspapers and magazines, generally marked a downturn in share in most of the countries surveyed. The biggest share decline of newspapers happened in Ireland and the United States, dropping 2.6 percent and 2.5 percent, respectively. Magazines' share declined the most in Poland and the United Kingdom, with 1.4 percent and 1.2 percent downturns, respectively, according to WARC.

However, newspapers gained a 1 percent share from 2006 to 2007 in Poland, while the magazine sector's share was up 0.3 percent in the United States, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-15 16:24

Cox Media Group Inc. announced on Wednesday the reorganisation of its media businesses that will see contribution to radio, television and newspaper content by the company's editorial staffers.

"This new concept is another step toward fulfilling Cox Media Group's vision of operating as a fully-integrated media company," Sandy Schwartz, president of Cox Media Group, stated in the announcement. "Sharing expertise and best practices across all of our media properties allows us to better serve consumers and advertisers in our changing environment. In addition, each of Cox's media properties will benefit from expanded shared services such as Research, Sales, Digital, Finance, Human Resources and Engineering."
The three separate mediums and their brand names will continue to operate independent news and editorial functions; however, the radio, television and newspaper networks will now share knowledge, talent and resources. Cox hopes the new model will result in increased operating efficiency and cost savings.

At present no jobs will be lost due to the reorganisation.

"We're creating a leadership model to better reflect the reality of today's media marketplace. As the boundaries between traditional and digital media merge, it's important to have leaders in place who can think broadly across the media landscape as they guide our way forward," added Schwartz.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-19 19:47

The destiny of newspapers is not totally pessimistic, according to Peter Conti, an SVP at Borrell Associates. Even though bankruptcies, defaults and closures still haunt the industry, Conti said although the industry will experience another decline this year, but in 2010 it will bounce back by 2.4 percent.

By 2014, newspapers will increase 8.7 percent over the '09 figures, to reach a little more than $39 billion, paidContent reported. Although it's still down compared to its peak in 2001, it seems "the worst could be over and a long way from extinction," according to Conti.

Conti's forecast is based on the notion that "because newspapers were the first industry to be negatively impacted by the Internet, it will also be the first medium to adjust," according to a Borrell blog post. In addition, most of the loss of classified and retail revenue goes to larger companies, which will continue to struggle with costs and layoffs. However, smaller players which survive the hard times will stabilise.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-08-07 18:53

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation