Date

Tue - 21.11.2017


newspaper industry

The Newspaper Association of America reported a 7.3% loss in combined print and online advertising in 2011, according to Poynter.

The NAA listed $20.692 billion in yearly advertising revenue for print newspapers, a 9.2% drop from 2010, and $3.249 billion in ad revenue for online newspapers, a 6.8% increase from last year.

Adding $10 billion for circulation revenue, which the NAA does not report, Rick Edmonds of Poynter approximated newspapers to be a $34 billion industry. Edmonds noted Google’s yearly revenue, $37.9 billion, to demonstrate the dire state of the newspaper industry.

Online newspapers also had a particularly weak fourth quarter with only 3.1% growth in ad revenue, compared to growth reported during the first three quarters of 2011.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-16 13:35

For the avoidance of doubt, let's get this out of the way: newspapers are not dead or dying.

It's often said by newspaper executives that "doom-mongering" commentariat have got it all wrong by predicting the death of dead tree publishing, and these complainants have a point.

Continue reading on the Media Briefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-06-08 17:28

You may have come across the chart-making work of blogger Michael DeGusta last month, when he recrunched some numbers on the music business that illustrated that industry's financial decline. And now he's cast his axis-loving eyes upon the newspaper business and, in particular, the Newspaper Association of America's release last week of 2010 advertising revenue numbers.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-22 17:19

For the media industry, 2010 was a big improvement over the disaster that was 2009. A new report adds up exactly how much better last year was, starting with how many newspapers folded.

Continue reading on Crain's New York Business

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-01-26 17:28

U.S. credit rating agency Moody's Investors Service Thursday lowered its outlook for the U.S. newspaper industry, from stable to negative, AFP reported.

Even though Moody's expects newspaper revenues to go down only 5 to 6 percent this year, and in the mid-single digits next year, less than the 22 percent drop in 2009, "the industry's longer-term secular deterioration is returning to the forefront," according to John Puchalla, vice president at Moody's, News and Tech reported.

"Even in a slowly growing economy, the erosion of newspapers' readership share and pricing power continues unabated as readers embrace free and low-cost content on the Web and mobile devices," he added.

To see the industry outlook back to stable, it would require a stronger economic expansion "or further development of user fees and advertising in new distribution channels through pay-walls or other means that would not overly cannibalize traditional print volumes or pricing," Moody's said.

Moody's changed the outlook for the industry from negative to stable six months ago, AFP reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-10-14 22:31

The free newspaper industry seems to be doing better this year as only three dailies have closed in the first 8 months of 2010, Newspaper Innovation revealed yesterday.

In the last four years, 2009 remains the year with more closures with 42 titles and their 97 editions disappearing from the streets. According to the data compiled by Newspaper Innovation, in 2007 30 titles shut down while in 2008 some 33 free dailies closed.

Graphic source: Newspaper Innovation

2010 closures include Portugal's Global Noticias, which had a circulation of 140,000 copies and stopped being published due to a "deep structural change of the market of the press," and Mexico's El Nuevo Siglo.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-24 19:31

Declines in the newspaper industry are expected to slow down this year, and the market will eventually stabilise by 2013 and resume growth in 2014, according to the Veronis Suhler Stevenson Communications Industry Forecast 2004-2014, Editor & Publisher reported.

VSS predicted that retail, classified and national advertisers will continue to shift budgets to digital platforms "to target audiences and improve return on investment," as print circulations drop, which indicates consumers' migration to new electronic media, the report stated.

Total newspaper spending is expected to decrease by 9.5 percent this year, to $37.79 billion, due to declines in dailies of 10.6 percent (to $30.2 billion), in weeklies of 7.1 percent, and in digital platforms of 1.1 percent.

VSS stated that some local advertisers will be back to print media by 2014 to reach its loyal older demographic. However, there will still be a drop of 2.5 percent in the compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in the forecast period because of the industry's earlier shortfalls.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-19 23:09

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation