Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


News International

If reports in this morning’s Daily Telegraph are accurate, News International’s frosty relationship with Google may be thawing.

After two self-imposed years in the wilderness, quality news titles owned by Rupert Murdoch’s British publishing division could find themselves re-included in Google search results as soon as next month.

The Times and The Sunday Times websites were originally removed from Google’s search index at the same time that paywalls were introduced at the thetimes.co.uk (then timesonline.co.uk), as part of News Int.’s attempts to stop users accessing content for free. Murdoch’s objection to consumers viewing premium content free of charge is no secret, and the media mogul hasn’t pulled any punches in his criticisms of Google’s operating policies.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-26 14:19

News Corporation has confirmed that over the next year it will separate its publishing and entertainment companies, after rumours of an impending split began circulating earlier this week. In a memo addressed to staff Rupert Murdoch assures his employees that the decision will see News Corp. separate into “two global leaders in their own right […] as opposed to merely one.”

The new media and entertainment company will include many of News Corp.’s most lucrative interests, such as the broadcasters BskyB, Sky Italia, and Fox Broadcasting, as well as the hugely successful 20th Century Fox Film. Whilst there is little doubt that these businesses will continue to flourish, the same cannot be said of the soon-to-be-annexed newspaper titles. Debate is raging over whether removing the safety-net of profits generated by the entertainment businesses will see the company’s newspapers forced to shape-up, or if the measure will ultimately lead to widespread cost-cutting and titles being sold-off or even closed.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-28 17:36

A little over a month ago, James Murdoch stepped down as chairman of News International. Now it has been announced that he is resigning as BSkyB chairman too. The Guardian writes that Nicholas Ferguson will replace James Murdoch as chairman of the UK satellite company as it continues to assessed by OfCom to determine whether it is a “fit and proper” broadcaster in the wake of the phone-hacking scandal at News International.

News International chief executive Tom Mockridge has been named as the new BSkyB deputy chairman. James Murdoch will continue as non-executive director of the company, said BSkyB in a statement, quoted in full by The Guardian. He will also continue in his role as deputy chief operating officer of News Corp.

In the statement, Murdoch explained that "as attention continues to be paid to past events at News International, I am determined that the interests of BSkyB should not be undermined by matters outside the scope of this company.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-03 17:37

News Corporation announced yesterday that James Murdoch, once seen as the logical heir to his father Rupert's media empire, has stepped down as News International chairman.

Although James Murdoch will remain deputy COO of News Corp, the company announced in a press release that he has "relinquished his position" at its subsidiary News International, which publishes the Sun and the Times of London.

Instead, James Murdoch will move to New York, where, according his father, he will "continue to assume a variety of essential corporate leadership mandates, with particular focus on important pay-TV businesses and broader international operations."

James Murdoch steps down as News International continues to deal with the consequences of the phone-hacking scandal that led to the closure of the News of the World last summer. Murdoch himself was twice called before the UK parliament's media select committee to answer questions about his involvement in the scandal.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-01 16:19

News International has reported steady growth in the number of digital subscribers to the Times and Sunday Times since both publications went behind a paywall in July 2010.

According to News International figures, the Times now has 119,255 digital subscribers, and the Sunday Times has 113,818. At both publications, the number of digital subscribers to has risen each month since September, when the Times had 111,036 subscribers and the Sunday Times had 105,594.

The company claims that in January, on average, 59,882 iPad editions of the Times were downloaded per day - an increase of 35% since September 2011. The Sunday Times was downloaded on the iPad an average of 63,959 times a week - an increase of 80% since last September.

The Times has also launched a web app for Safari and Google Chrome that recreates the "newspaper-like" experience of the Times tablet edition.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-15 18:12

The arrests of five Sun journalists over alleged corrupt payments made to police and public officials have prompted angry responses from sections of the UK press and from the National Union of Journalists.

Sun deputy editor Geoff Webster, chief reporter John Kay, chief foreign correspondent Nick Parker, picture editor John Edwards and deputy news editor John Sturgis were arrested early on Saturday morning and later released on bail.

Trevor Kavanagh at The Sun condemned the arrests in an article today, beginning "The Sun is not a 'swamp' that needs draining". He protested that the paper's journalists are being "treated like members of an organised crime gang" who are "subjects of the biggest police operation in British criminal history".

Kavanagh characterises the ongoing police investigation as "out of proportion", and describes the alleged crimes of the journalists who were arrested as being nothing more than "to act as journalists have acted on all newspapers through the ages, unearthing stories that shape our lives, often obstructed by those who prefer to operate behind closed doors"

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-13 16:03

Newspapers are still looking for the right model for their online paywalls.

News of The World, the latest News International papers to go behind a paywall (the others two being the Times and the Sunday Times, which became paid-only websites in July) has seen a 59 per cent decrease in unique users to its website in November, after the first full month behind a paywall, the Beehive reported, citing comScore data.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-14 17:47

News International launched on Friday the Sunday Times iPad app, which gives readers access to the 12 sections and the three magazines of the Sunday newspaper, Marketing Week reported.

The app is being offered for free to those who subscribe to the print and digital editions of the newspaper. However, it's also available for £1.79 per issue and it includes exclusive access to a TV guide.

Photo source: Press Gazette
Rupert Murdoch's media company also introduced an update of the Times app, which costs £9.99 a month and was being sold without a subscription bundle, the Press Gazette reminded.

Both the Times and the Sunday Times websites went behind a paywall in June and, according to a recent research, have only been able to retain 14 percent of its users.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-13 23:54

"New research from Experian Hitwise suggests that 54,000 people a month are accessing content behind the paywall of The Times", Press Gazette reported.The article refers to research commissioned by Guardian News and Media, which was published internally by the company yesterday.

The GNM memo says, as Press Gazette reported, that they "estimate that a total of about 54,000 people globally are accessing content behind the paywall on the Times [and Sunday Times] website each month. Of the 54,000, approximately 28,000 are specifically paying for digital content. The remainder are print subscribers who get free access to the site as part of their newspaper subscription package."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-08 17:59

UK daily The Times has lost 86 percent of its online readers since it put up a paywall in June, according to a study presented today by Oliver & Ohlbaum Associates, Journalism.co.uk reported. Fourteen percent of its core audience has subscribe to the website.

Among those who used to read The Times online, 35 percent have replaced it with an alternative free website and 51 percent "have not switched to another site," explained Oliver & Ohlbaum Associates CEO Mark Oliver during the Westminster Media Forum, paidContent.org quoted.

"So far, virtually none of the predictions about what would happen have turned out to be correct," said News international's strategy and production development director Dominic Young pointing out that the paywall has had a "very encouraging start."

According to News International, The Times and The Sunday Times had more than 105,000 paid-for customers since June.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-02 22:20

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