Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


News Corporation

After three years as chief digital officer at News Corporation, Chris Miller has announced his departure from the company, effective as of next month. Miller seems to be parting on good terms and will, according to a News Corp. press release, continue to work “as an outside advisor [to the company] on digital issues through fall 2013.”

Having been drafted into the company in 2009 to reinvigorate News Corp.’s diverse (and struggling) digital assets, a key part of Miller’s role was making digital a priority across the company’s numerous news divisions. During his tenure, Miller oversaw the introduction of a paywall at the Times of London and the Wall Street Journal and was a leading force behind the initiative to incorporate the use of video in News Corp.’s traditional news publications. As a result, reporters at the WSJ are now trained in using video functions on their smartphones.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-24 13:27

Early on Tuesday morning rumours began to circulate of a possible restructuring within Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, which would see the company separate its entertainment businesses from its smaller section of publishing titles. The rumours are generally seen as credible, having been first published in the News Corp-owned Wall Street Journal. Though the company’s representatives are so far refusing to confirm or deny reports outright, BBC Business editor Robert Preston has been told by a News Corps insider that the company has “nothing to add to [the] WSJ piece”.

The idea of dividing News Corp into two separate organisations is not a new one, having first been suggested several years ago, but until now Murdoch had always rejected such a move. The media mogul seems to have a sentimental attachment to newspapers, that until the 1980s were the nucleus of News Corporation. However, the recent scandals that have engulfed Murdoch-owned titles such as the former News of the World have led shareholders to see splitting the company as an ideal way to protect the company’s film and television interests, including the Fox Broadcasting Network and British Sky Broadcasting, from the problems besieging the company’s UK newspaper titles.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-26 14:13

Rupert Murdoch on Wednesday pushed the send button on The Daily, a news application designed for the iPad that he hopes will position his News Corporation front and center in the digital newsstand of the future.

"New times demand new journalism," Mr. Murdoch said on stage at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York before an audience of reporters, media executives, employees and advertising partners.

Continue reading in The New York Times

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-03 18:09

"New research from Experian Hitwise suggests that 54,000 people a month are accessing content behind the paywall of The Times", Press Gazette reported.The article refers to research commissioned by Guardian News and Media, which was published internally by the company yesterday.

The GNM memo says, as Press Gazette reported, that they "estimate that a total of about 54,000 people globally are accessing content behind the paywall on the Times [and Sunday Times] website each month. Of the 54,000, approximately 28,000 are specifically paying for digital content. The remainder are print subscribers who get free access to the site as part of their newspaper subscription package."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-08 17:59

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp bought on Monday 90 percent of Wireless Generation, a U.S. company that develops mobile and Internet educational software for teachers, Bloomberg revealed. The media group paid US$360 million in cash for the acquisition.

"We see a $500bn sector in the U.S. alone that is waiting desperately to be transformed by big breakthroughs that extend the reach of great teaching," said Murdoch, The Telegraph quoted.

According to the Financial Times, the deal will allow News Corp compete other media groups that have invested in software and education services like Pearson, which owns the FT Group.

This is the first time in almost 20 years that News Corp, which owns The Wall Street Journal and The New York Post, will "foray into the for-profit world of education since its book publishing arm, Harper Collins, got out of the textbook business in the mid-1990s," The New York Times reminded.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-25 16:48

Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation shelved this week its ambitious Alesia Project, a paid-for news content aggregation platform that promised publishers to generate new digital revenue streams, Poynter.org informed today.

"It is believed that News Corp's decision not to take the product to market is related to concerns over running costs," explained Campaign magazine, which estimated in £20 million ($31.5 million) the investment made in this venture. The digital newsstand was going to be launch in the next few weeks and at least £1 million had been already allocated to advertise it.

Although no official explanation has been provided, a source said to Reuters that the company "was unable to reach a 'critical mass' of publishers to support the plan."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-22 22:36

Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation plans to launch a content-led, paid-for news content aggregation platform that promises to create new digital revenue streams for its core print titles and third-party publishers as well, MediaWeek.co.uk reported today. The news aggregation platform plans to launch before the end of 2010.

While the project, under development for a year, is not being named yet, its involves content aggregation from News International's core print titles: The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and News of the World, along with content from third party publishers.

Image: Aftercollege.com

Initially planned to be launched in November, the platform's release has been delayed, as deals with publishers and blue-chip advertisers are not yet finalised, according to Media Week. The service will harness all digital applications including the iPhone and iPad, and will also carry advertising and sponsorship opportunities.

Company executives have been in talks with many U.S. and UK publishers about a news consortium believed to be associated with this launch, according to Media Week.

The news content aggregation project is led by former managing director of thelondonpaper, Ian Clark along with the corporation's digital tech specialist, Johnny Kaldor.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-10-06 16:06

The Sunday Times plans to launch its own online edition, which could eventually charge for content, Media Guardian reported Wednesday.

Until now, Sunday Times content has appeared online along with its daily counterpart, The Times, under the title TImes Online. Though the launch date is uncertain, the new site would be devoted to the Sunday Times content only.

Decisions regarding payment plans and what content would be charged for are also not finalised; however, subscribers to the paper will not have to pay for access to online content.

The somewhat expected plans to institute payment plans comes after Rupert Murdoch, chairman and chief of the paper's parent company News Corporation, announced the company was "planning to introduce a pay model across all our properties but we will test it first on some of our stronger properties," according to Media Guardian.

James Murdoch, chairman and chief executive of News Corporation in Europe and Asia, said he expects the online editions will take about two years to recuperate on losses from falling advertising revenue from print editions.

"There are lots of ways we can make money from content over and above the advertising market" Murdoch said, describing the online publishing model as "malfunctioning," Media Guardian reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-04 13:49

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