Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


News Corp

It was supposed to herald the start of a digital publishing revolution. Instead Rupert Murdoch’s The Daily, the world’s first digital newspaper designed exclusively for the iPad, is rumoured to be facing closure.

In an article for the New York Observer on the effects of News Corp’s recent cuts, Kat Stoeffel reports on rumours that the digital publication has been put “on watch” and will discover its fate after the US presidential elections on November 6th.

Although as yet unconfirmed, if proven to be true the news is unlikely to come as much of a surprise to those who have been closely following the digital title’s fortunes. The Daily launched on a wave of optimism at the beginning of February last year, introduced by Murdoch himself as the company’s answer to the changing world of journalism: “New times demand new journalism… and a new service edited and designed specifically for new devices. Our challenge is to take the best of traditional journalism…and combine it with the best of contemporary technology.”

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-12 15:54

A long-form piece for the weekend: Tim de Lisle of Intelligent Life follows the "triumphs and tribulations" of the Guardian, and talks to its piano-playing Editor-in-Chief, Alan Rusbridger, in an attempt to answer its provocative headline: Can the Guardian Survive?

“Yesterday’s News Corp split announcement could spell big changes at The Times as Rupert Murdoch vowed losses would not be tolerated at any of the company’s print titles,” begins an article by Andrew Pugh on PressGazette. Murdoch reportedly said yesterday that he plans to be more "bullish" in the US than in the UK, and that “each newspaper will be expected to pay its way.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-29 15:12

As the fallout continues over allegations of phone hacking and corruption at News International, Rupert Murdoch appeared before the Leveson Inquiry today to answer questions about his personal relationship with politicians and the political influence wielded by his UK newspapers.

Under the intense gaze of international media outlets, Murdoch told the inquiry that he had never used the reporting from his papers as a way to further his business interests. "I have never asked a prime minister for anything," Murdoch told the inquiry, also stating, "I take a particularly strong pride that we have never pushed our commercial interests in our newspapers."

With questions scrutinising his relationships with UK Prime Ministers as far back as Margaret Thatcher, the inquiry sought to establish whether the media mogul had undue political influence in the UK. Murdoch downplayed his political pull, saying for example that, “I met Mr. Blair, if you look at the record, an average of two, maybe three times in the same year.” He also stressed, "I, in 10 years he was in power, never asked Mr Blair for anything, nor did I receive any favours."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-25 17:52

News Corporation announced yesterday that James Murdoch, once seen as the logical heir to his father Rupert's media empire, has stepped down as News International chairman.

Although James Murdoch will remain deputy COO of News Corp, the company announced in a press release that he has "relinquished his position" at its subsidiary News International, which publishes the Sun and the Times of London.

Instead, James Murdoch will move to New York, where, according his father, he will "continue to assume a variety of essential corporate leadership mandates, with particular focus on important pay-TV businesses and broader international operations."

James Murdoch steps down as News International continues to deal with the consequences of the phone-hacking scandal that led to the closure of the News of the World last summer. Murdoch himself was twice called before the UK parliament's media select committee to answer questions about his involvement in the scandal.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-01 16:19

The arrests of five Sun journalists over alleged corrupt payments made to police and public officials have prompted angry responses from sections of the UK press and from the National Union of Journalists.

Sun deputy editor Geoff Webster, chief reporter John Kay, chief foreign correspondent Nick Parker, picture editor John Edwards and deputy news editor John Sturgis were arrested early on Saturday morning and later released on bail.

Trevor Kavanagh at The Sun condemned the arrests in an article today, beginning "The Sun is not a 'swamp' that needs draining". He protested that the paper's journalists are being "treated like members of an organised crime gang" who are "subjects of the biggest police operation in British criminal history".

Kavanagh characterises the ongoing police investigation as "out of proportion", and describes the alleged crimes of the journalists who were arrested as being nothing more than "to act as journalists have acted on all newspapers through the ages, unearthing stories that shape our lives, often obstructed by those who prefer to operate behind closed doors"

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-13 16:03

The financial cost of the News of the World phone-hacking scandal may still be growing, but News Corp has seen its net profits grow by 65% between October 1 and December 31 2011 compared to the same period last year.

Yesterday News Corp published an earnings release, revealing that it made a net profit of $1.06bn in the last three months of 2011, compared profits of $624m in the same period in 2010.

Profits were driven by growth in the company's cable network programming, filmed entertainment and television divisions.

News Corp chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch said in a statement that he was "particularly pleased with the success of our business strategies in spite of the uncertain economic conditions that we continue to face."

News Corp's cable division saw its operating income grow by 20% in the last three months of 2011, fuelled partly by the lower fees the company paid to broadcast NBA basketball. The corporation also benefited from profits from Fox News and growth in Latin American channels.

Profits from the company's filmed entertainment division more than doubled thanks to the success of films including "Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked".

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-09 18:08

Barely a day seems to go by without a publisher launching a new app for Apple or Android. But now it's Microsoft's turn for a spot in the limelight, as Rupert Murdoch's News Corp announces its launch of a range of apps for Xbox 360.

Those who sign up to News Corp's Gold Subscription Package - costing £39.99 a year - will now get access to content from FOX, Fox News Channel, The Wall Street Journal and other News Corp media on their Xbox.

Most relevant to news publishers is the app from The Wall Street Journal, WSJLive. The app will offer four hours of live programming from across the Journal's other digital platforms. This will not only include content from the Journal's core new site, but also from its subsidiaries Dow Jones Newswires, Barron's, MarketWatch, SmartMoney and All Things D.

The FOX Broadcasting app and Fox News Channel app will give viewers access to news programs and to entertainment shows like The Simpsons, Glee, Bones and House. The apps will be integrated with Facebook, giving them a social dimension, and will also make use of Xbox Kinect's voice and motion control technology. Only "authenticated subscribers of participating cable and satellite television distributors" will be able to view Fox video content.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-11 14:11

A great debate over media concentration has been taking place in the UK as News Corp bids to buy BSkyB, whose properties include 24-hour news channel Sky News. News Corp already owns 39% of BSkyB, more commonly referred to as Sky, and there has been much opposition to allowing the purchase of the remainder of the company.

News Corp, via its subsidiary News International, owns The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and The News of the World, which account for about 37% of the national newspaper market. Sky is the UK's largest pay TV platform, reaching one third of all homes. As well as news, it focuses on sports, films and entertainment. It also has a significant radio news presence. Combined, News Corp and BSkyB would have a turnover of £7.5bn, compared to the BBC's £4.8bn.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-23 16:17

Rupert Murdoch's Australian newspapers will start charging for online content next year, News Corp. News Digital Media CEO Richard Freudenstein announced today, The Guardian revealed.

In an interview with ABC News radio, Freudenstein said The Australian, Daily Telegraph and the Herald-Sun were unlikely to follow The Times of London paywall model. "I think we're quite attracted to the Wall Street Journal model where you get the benefit of still getting a lot of your advertising revenue combining it with the ability to market yourself to a whole range of people and then upselling them into the paid part of the site," he said.

Freudenstein said The Wall Street Journal's approach "was very successful" as it allow readers to get some content for free. According to paidContent.org, The Times website charges £1 a day or £2 a week and it's only free for those with a print subscription, whereas the "WSJ.com is priced at $1.99 weekly but billed as $103.48 and includes some articles free to visitors from search listings."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-19 22:57

UK media regulatory body Ofcom announced it will release its evaluation of the possible total acquisition of broadcasting company BSkyB by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. by Dec. 31, Brand Republic reported today. Additionally, Canadian Business divulged that on Wednesday the European Commission said it is looking into the proposed acquisition and that it will present an anti-trust report on Dec. 8.

"Heaven forfend that we will create a Fox News here in the UK," said British Labor Party Politician Lord Smith of Finsbury, The Telegraph wrote. "We must ensure the plurality of media ownership and therefore of media voice."

Image via Zimbio

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-04 22:39

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