Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


New York Times Co.

January 2011 will be the end of the free NYTimes.com.

Executive editor Bill Keller revealed the news yesterday evening at a dinner event for the Foreign Press Association, but he did not give any other information, such as pricing or paywall model The Times will use, Fast Company reported today.

The Times will only charge for access to selected stories, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal.

In the past, chairman Arthur Sulzberger Jr. has said those who don't pay will only be able to read a certain number of stories per month, according to the National Business Review of New Zealand.

Allowing users to read a certain number of articles before they are prompted to pay in order to read more is a "metered" paywall, such as the one the Financial Times uses. The Wall Street Journal, on the other hand, provides a mix of stories each day - some paid, some that can be read for free.

The Times has about 20 million unique users, the NBR noted.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-15 00:16

The launch of the Wall Street Journal's New York Section has prompted the Guardian's Peter Preston to consider the future focus of national newspapers like the Journal. If the Journal, once a solely-national paper, can move towards local coverage, is that the inevitable future for the rest of the large nationals in the industry?

He seems to think yes. The WSJ's Greater New York launch wasn't a personal attack on the New York Times or Arthur Sulzberger; rather, it was a smart business move in changing times.

"In spite of all the hype and excitement, this isn't some wild News Corporation lurch into alien territory," writes Preston. "It's competition as usual in an American newspaper world that seems to have forgotten what competition means."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-04 19:41

The New York Times is still planning to launch its metered paywall early next year, because that model is right for now; but in the future, it may not be, Times Co. Chairman and Publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. said at Bloomberg BusinessWeek's Media Summit 2010, paidContent reported today.

"We believe going to a metered model now is the right thing. But 10 years from now? Who knows?" he said.

Sulzberger also discussed the issue of being in control of subscriber lists when it's time for The Times' digital version to appear on the iPad, Crains New York Business reported. And if Apple CEO Steve Jobs wants control, he's in for a fight.

"Having that direct relationship with our customer is critical," Sulzberger said during a Q&A session at the conference. "We are going to continue to have that, because it's critical to our business success."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-12 00:09

The New York Times has begun publishing two weekly international news supplements in Bosnia's Dnevni Avaz newspaper and El Salvador's La Prensa Gráfica, Editor & Publisher reported. The newspapers began publishing the supplement Monday.

The Dnevni Avaz supplement is being published in English, while the La Prensa Gráfica supplement is in Spanish. Newspapers in 29 other countries also carry The New York Times international weekly supplement, according to Thaindian News.

The weekly supplements retain the layout and typography of The New York Times, and offer content including news, features, commentary, world affairs, business, culture, style and social trends, Media Mughals reported. The editions are created in New York by The New York Times News Service and also feature articles from The Times.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-04 18:45

The Wall Street Journal's New York section, set to launch in April, will compete against The New York Times for local readers and major advertisers, a cause for concern at The Times. Although capturing maximum readership, attracting advertisers and creating a solid customer base will not be easy for the Journal, it also means that The Times has something to lose, while the Journal is looking at a tremendous opportunity, AdvertisingAge reported.

Sources "close to the situation" told Ad Age that The Journal's New York section is expected to include coverage of New York's sports teams, as well as reports on culture, news from City Hall and even state government coverage from Albany, according to AdAge. The Journal is expected to chase advertisers and the paper might eventually hire sales staff for the metro edition.

Rupert Murdoch, Chairman and CEO of News Corp., which owns the Journal, announced the launch of the section yesterday. Although he did not mention The Times by name, he said that "a certain other New York daily has essentially stopped covering the city the way it once did and instead has focused on being more of a national newspaper interested mostly in prizes."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-03 22:34

The New York Times will launch a metered paid model on its Web site at the beginning of next year, the newspaper announced today. Under the plan, users to access more than a set number of articles per month will be asked to pay a flat fee for additional access. Print subscribers will be given full access, according to the Wall Street Journal.

"This process of rethinking our business model has also been driven by our desire to achieve additional revenue diversity that will make us less susceptible to the inevitable economic cycles," Janet L. Robinson, president and CEO, The New York Times Company, said in a press release. "We were also guided by the fact that our news and information are being featured in an increasingly broad range of end-user devices and services, and our pricing plans and policies must reflect this vision."

A metered approach means Times content will still be visible online, and thus be able to continue selling a large audience to advertisers, The Times' David Carr wrote today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-21 00:44

The New York Times is expected to announce within days that it will charge for access to its online news content. After much in-house debate, the paywall is expected to be along the lines of what the Wall Street Journal uses, as well as a metered system such as the one the Financial Times uses, New York Magazine reported yesterday.

However, the big question isn't whether The Times will charge, but what kind of a paywall it will be.

Felix Salmon wrote in his Reuters blog that:

"The first and most important principle that the NYT must bear in mind is that any smart metering system will work more like a taxicab than like the dreadful FT approach: the key thing is that a meter measures how much of the service you've consumed, and then you pay for that much -- and no more. At the FT, by contrast, the meter slams down a hard paywall after you've reached n pageviews in a given month, and then charges you a very large sum for the n+1th pageview. That's stupid, because no single pageview is worth that much to a reader.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-19 00:00

The New York Times Co.'s decline in ad revenue has been eased this quarter and Web ad sales are up again, according to the publisher's statement released Tuesday, The Associated Press reported.

The projection brought in hopes that the company will be back on the financial track in 2010, and lifted its shares up slightly.

However, there is still a lot to be done for the Times Co. to find the balance it will need. The loss of printed ad revenue can not compensate the earning from Internet advertising, according to the AP article posted on Google News.

In the final quarter of the year, the company is expecting 25 percent down in print advertising, or about US$97 million decline, year-over-year, to $290 million. On the other hand, the publisher is expected to gain $90 million, or 10 percent growth, from online ad sales in the fourth quarter.

In order to cut cost and boost profits, the Times Co. this year has reduced its expenses by about $475 million, or about 17 percent of its' operating costs last year. It eliminated about 20 percent staff since last year and expects some more 100 positions cut by the end of this year.

In addition, the company has been earning more revenue by raising cover prices. Circulation revenue gained seven percent in the previous quarter and is projected to rise another two percent, or about $5 million, in the fourth quarter.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-12-10 18:27

The New York Times Co. yesterday announced that it has abandoned plans to sell a Massachusetts newspaper due to a transformation of its "journalistic and business operations," Agence France-Presse reported yesterday.

Times Co. chairman Arthur Sulzberger and chief executive Janet Robinson were quoted by AFP as saying the following in a memo to employees of the Worcester Telegram & Gazette: "We are convinced that in partnership with the Boston Globe you are now prepared to move forward to a brighter future."

The Times Co. also withdrew The Boston Globe from sale in October, possibly due to paltry offers, The Boston Globe then observed.

Yesterday's announcement of improved finances at The Times Co. subsidiary coincided with the deadline for staffers at its flagship newspaper to voluntarily resign, according to Business Insider. The Times offered buyouts in October, hoping to cut 100 members of the editorial team by year's end without resorting to compulsory layoffs. An unnamed employee of The Times was quoted by Business Insider as saying that a second round of layoffs was expected in 2010.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-08 21:52

The Chicago News Cooperative, which we first reported on last month, launched today, publishing its first stories in The New York Times Chicago edition.

The first piece of journalism is about profits from Chicago's parking meter operations; the rest can be found here. Getting help from non-profit journalism firms is being discussed at length by publishers searching to cut costs, but not content. Critics, however, say that for these investigative enterprises to really work, they must produce important reporting that isn't available elsewhere.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-20 23:44

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