Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


new revenue stream

Boston.com has chosen to deploy a content recommendation platform from Outbrain, a New York-based company to increase traffic and boost revenues on its news site, while enhancing readers' experiences, Editor & Publisher reported.

Through deployment of this new content recommendation tool, the news site will provide "related links" and automatically alert readers to additional stories that maybe of interest to them at the end of each article, according to a press release posted on MarketWatch.com. The Outbrain's technology uses complex set of algorithms to identify and serve up stories targeting different audience segments, while helping readers find relevant new stories at ease with simple related links.

"We're always looking for cost-effective and innovative ways to increase user engagement across our Web site while providing the highest quality experience for our audience," Vice President of Products Bob Kempf told E&P. "This is a sophisticated way to refer readers to content and enhance their experience on the site." Some paid recommended links from third-party publishers will also be available.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-10-07 22:11

Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation plans to launch a content-led, paid-for news content aggregation platform that promises to create new digital revenue streams for its core print titles and third-party publishers as well, MediaWeek.co.uk reported today. The news aggregation platform plans to launch before the end of 2010.

While the project, under development for a year, is not being named yet, its involves content aggregation from News International's core print titles: The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and News of the World, along with content from third party publishers.

Image: Aftercollege.com

Initially planned to be launched in November, the platform's release has been delayed, as deals with publishers and blue-chip advertisers are not yet finalised, according to Media Week. The service will harness all digital applications including the iPhone and iPad, and will also carry advertising and sponsorship opportunities.

Company executives have been in talks with many U.S. and UK publishers about a news consortium believed to be associated with this launch, according to Media Week.

The news content aggregation project is led by former managing director of thelondonpaper, Ian Clark along with the corporation's digital tech specialist, Johnny Kaldor.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-10-06 16:06

Magazine publishers are finding new ways to connect with readers through Facebook by giving them an opportunity to read content and subscribe without leaving the social networking site, AdAge reported last week.

Until recently, companies have widely used Facebook to direct traffic to external Web sites. But coming in July or August, with the introduction of a new system being developed by e-commerce application development company Alvenda and Time Inc.'s subscription division, called Synapse, users will be able to access magazine content integrated in the Facebook news feeds as blurbs. Users will be able to expand the blurbs in order to read the full story and ads will appear along with the story on Facebook itself, without being redirected to an external link.
Users will also be able to subscribe to magazines of their choice within Facebook.

"Consumers don't want to leave where they are on the web, wherever they are," Alix Hart, VP for online marketing at Synapse, told AdAge. "Facebook is a place where we think that over the coming year there are going to be more and more opportunities to present magazine offers in a really relevant way to consumers, as they're starting to share magazine content in a much deeper way than ever before."

This new system also presents an alternative revenue maximising opportunity for publishers by integrating magazine content along with ads on readers' news feeds to grab maximum reach.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-17 22:12

Guardian News & Media Group's Open Platform data sharing initiative plans to go live this month, MediaWeek.co.uk reported. The initiative has been in its beta phase since its launch last year.

Staffers at the media house plan to officially launch the Open Platform initiative for its commercial audience, which includes media and creative agencies, on May 20. The platform facilitates customised application development for its commercial partners, while trading statistics and content from the news publisher for free, in return for carrying its advertising.

The venture allows potential partners to access the Guardian's database and download content for free, in a format that can be easily incorporated by other web applications.

Representing a "new area" of development for the advertising world, Adam Freeman, director of consumer media at GN&M told MediaWeek, "I can see major brands investing in it, including financial services, car brands and those which view digital as a core marketing platform." He further pointed out the advantages of the new platform to small and medium publishers, who "want great content" but can't "afford to produce it themselves".

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-14 20:56

Thomson Reuters will launch an on-demand, customisable financial web video service for its paid subscribers, called "Reuters Insider" tomorrow, paidContent reported. The new product will include specially produced video programming by Reuters, as well as 150 of its content partners, including CNBC.

The video platform was created to help hedge funds, traders, research analysts, banks and brokers communicate with clients, as well as to transform "financial programming from a passive one-way broadcast into a highly collaborative and personalised medium," according to the Financial Times. Subscribers pay as much as $2,000 a year.
Taking the video and online social networking revolution into the financial sector indicates the increasing reliance by traders on videos with data, graphs and charts embedded within for trading decisions.

The service is much like a Youtube for the financially interested, David Carr wrote in an article for The New York Times. It has a main window called Channel One, which enables subscribers to navigate and search for videos by sector, date, markets or region, and facilitates application of filters to create personalised channels.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-10 23:17

Parade magazine is now selling ads on the Web sites of its partner newspapers as an alternative method of revenue making, MediaWeek reported.

Parade is an insert on weekend editions of newspapers across the United States. Having started distributing celebrity and game content to the carrier paper sites a year ago, this strategic initiative by the magazine to sell on its papers' Web sites is aimed at effectively transforming the Sunday newspaper supplement into an online ad network.

The new online ad partnership means that local papers can now get national ads, which wouldn't otherwise be available through ad networks or on their own, and the magazine gets a cut of the revenue for effective sale.

"As we push this content out, there's a cost for us, and as our digital footprint grows, we wanted to take advantage of that," Parade publisher Brett Wilson told MediaWeek.

Wilson said the new set-up is a "syndicated network - in the positive sense of the word," as Parade magazine customises ads around the branded content it syndicates. Relying on external sources for editorial content, the Parade's content strategy spans as a trend across print media.

Parade's sales strategy so far appears to be appealing to retailers and packaged goods providers looking to drive purchasing power, Ildi Pap Conrad, U.S. director of print investment, OMD, told MediaWeek.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-07 22:13

The Tribune Company-owned Los Angeles Times will soon begin adding e-commerce links to selected stories and blog posts, as "both a reader service and a revenue opportunity for the company," editor Russ Stanton told staffers in a memo yesterday, LAObserved reported.

The e-commerce links will be highlighted in green with a double underline and no blue editorial link will be replaced with an e-commerce link. Each article or a post that includes an e-commerce green link will have a disclaimer at its foot stating: "Clicking on Green Links will take you to a third-party e-commerce site. These sites are not operated by the Los Angeles Times. The Times Editorial staff is not involved in any way with Green Links or with these third-party sites," Stanton stated in the memo, posted on LAObserved. "These post-publication links to sites such as Amazon and TicketNetwork will serve as both a reader service and a revenue opportunity for the company."
The ads will be placed by an e-commerce producer based at the Chicago Tribune, also owned by the Tribune Co., where the project has been in its testing phase for about six months. The e-commerce links will appear on health, image, food, travel, books, entertainment, sports sections and photo galleries. The green links will not appear in columns, news section articles and blogs, according to the memo on LAObserved.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-28 22:14

The first annual World Newspaper Future & Change Study is a global research study about newspaper publishers' business strategies moving forward for the next five years, with the key objective to inspire newspaper executives to invest and innovate their business units and business practices, according to the latest SFN's report, Charting the Course for Newspapers.

The purpose of the study is to pinpoint the business and strategic challenges of the world's newspapers, and then to identify the publishers' strategies moving forward to turn the challenges into opportunities.

It has been said that the only reason we change the way we do things is because we change the way we look at things. And it's clear from an analysis of responses to the open-ended question, "What is the single most important change that has to be implemented in your newspaper over the next year?" that the majority of news organisations are taking a fresh look at the way things have been done and planning to make significant changes in the year ahead.

- Enthusiasm for Change

One of the key challenges in changing strategies from a "business as usual" newspaper company to a dynamic company that is developing new revenue-making strategies for now and the future, is managing the changes in the organisation and amongst the employees.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-02-08 23:22

The Chicago Tribune will digitise its vast photo archive so it may sell original prints and also retain the rights to the more than seven million images, the Chicago Tribune reported.

The newspaper struck a deal with Image Fortress, a digital archiving service that works with organisations like NASA and the World Bank, to digitise the photos and to also market them through a collectible dealer, Jay Parrino's The Mint. Tribune expects the sales to more than cover the cost incurred to digitise the images, a process expected to take more than five years.

Sales are expected to reach "millions of dollars over the term of the deal," Randall Weissman, news administration editor, told Phil Rosenthal, Tribune's media writer

"We pay Image Fortress a certain amount of money to do the digitization. Then we get paid from The Mint from the sale of the asset ... Their expertise is at looking at 1,000 photos and knowing which ones will sell at premium prices. ... We (also) get paid from licensing and sales of rights to the digital images," Weissman said. He did not mention whether the Tribune will monetize the digital copies.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-02 05:03

The Wall Street Journal is diversifying its business, launching its very own travel agency, called WSJTravel on Thursday. When it launches, the agency will provide planned trips to 50 destinations, including Vietnam, Tuscany and California's wine country among others, Media Post reported.

"Just as you have come to rely on The Wall Street Journal's perspective of global events, many WSJ travel vacations will let you experience a destination from a completely new viewpoint," the announcement stated, according to Editor & Publisher. The WSJ travel agency promises trips around the world for "any range of budget" and destinations "inspired by articles' from the newspaper, according to a statement.

Since the WSJ was bought by News Corp. in 2007, many branded, high-end services to build consumer engagement and provide new revenue streams have been introduced, such as the launch of a mail-order wine club in partnership with Laithwaite's Wine Merchants, which was soon followed by an initiative to venture into travel book publishing with "The Wall Street Journal Guide to Power Travel," by Scott McCartney.

However, its not the only U.S. newspaper forging expansion.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-01-25 23:29

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