Date

Fri - 28.04.2017


mobile news

By now, most daily news publishers are making at least some attempt to make their content accessible on cell phones and tablets. But usually their strategies focus on "shovelware"--automatically repackaging content produced for the computer-based web, with scant consideration for how and why people use mobile devices.

In a recent interview, Luke Wroblewski (a top expert on mobile design and usability) explained why news publishers should start thinking "mobile first"--and how they can achieve that goal to get ahead of the next disruptive wave of media technology...

Continue reading on Knight Digital Media Center

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-21 17:33

Regional newspaper publishers are blithely shovelling their expensive content to mobile channels with no hint of a business model, according to new research.

Publications in 66 UK cities have mostly abandoned experiments with chargeable SMS delivery and have instead created free mobile websites.

But, out of the 23 papers with mobile sites, only three sell display advertising against their pages, according to a paper presented by researchers Francois Nel and Oscar Westlund to Cardiff University's Future Of Journalism conference.

Continue reading on paidContent.org

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-09-16 09:54

One thing is obvious about smartphone users: they like to DO stuff. Rarely will they passively read or watch anything on their phones for more than a minute. Unfortunately, the vast majority of news orgs' mobile news apps mostly just repackage the content of a complete news website. That is not a very compelling mobile app experience.

So try making news apps that do what apps do best: experiment with releasing smaller, special-purpose apps that focus on interactivity...

Continue reading on Knight Digital Media Center

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-06-21 13:43

USA Today is looking to make an old idea new again, using smart phone-friendly barcodes to connect newspaper readers to digital content that will enhance their reading experience.

The paper announced last week it would begin using Microsoft Tags, a free but proprietary barcode system, to provide mobile users easy access to online videos, photo galleries, and other online materials.

Reading a Tag requires the installation of a free mobile app, a step most smart phone users now take in stride.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-16 17:15

The mobile landscape is changing fast, says Will Sullivan, and journalists need help keeping up.

Figuring out which apps to use can be a challenge, not to mention picking a phone. Aside from deciding between two iPhones (Verizon or AT&T) there are also dozens of Android models across multiple wireless carriers.

This environment demands that editors and managers become more informed and able to respond more quickly to new mobile technologies.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-01-24 20:47

The most popular content consumed by iPhone users and all smartphone users in the United Kingdom is access to news via mobile browser (79.7 percent and 48 percent, respectively) in January 2009, according to comScore. By comparison, 55.6 percent of iPhone users and 22.1 percent of all smartphone users accessed news and information by downloaded applications, detailed in World Digital Media Trends 2010, released by the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

E-mail was accessed by 75.4 percent of iPhone users and by 35.4 percent of all smartphone users, while listening to mobile music was consumed by 65.6 percent of iPhone users and 40.5 percent of all smartphone users during the same period. By comparison, a fraction of all mobile phone users did any of these activities.

For World Digital Media Trends 2010, the SFN project has partnered with 66 research companies - including PricewaterhouseCoopers, the Pew Research Center, Magna Global, comScore, ZenithOptimedia, eMarketer, and more - to piece together the vast landscape of the world's media and advertising markets, as well as emerging trends across platforms.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-12-16 18:05

As part of a marketing deal between The Times and telecom company Three (Hutchison 3G UK), 3G customers will be offered free access to The Times and Sunday Times websites for the next three months, according to a report by CellularNews.com today.

Following the initial three months free offer, the pay as you go customers who top up every 30 days will continue to enjoy free access for another month, whereas the contract customers can continue getting access to the News International titles for £2 a week, TheInquirer.net reported today. This offer from Three is valid for new customers until March 2011.

Three had also announced earlier deals with Facebook by way of the social networks' Facebook Zero product, leading theNextWeb's Matt Brian to wonder: "how News International will report the additional subscribers and whether other newspapers will begin to maximise exposure via deals with mobile operators. The Guardian has recently started charging a monthly subscription for its iPhone app, could a operator deal follow?"

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-15 18:09

"Newspapers have 12 years or less left to live in print," according to the digital consultant Ross Dawson, who will speak in the Newspaper Publishers' Association forum in Sydney, Australia this Thursday, mUmBRELLA reported.

According to a NPA release, Dawson said: "By 2022 newspapers as we know them will be irrelevant in Australia. However the leading newspaper publishers of today may have transformed themselves to thrive in what will be a flourishing media industry," The Australian reported.

Photo: Pranav Mistry

He predicted that within 10 years, mobile reading devices would become our "primary news interfaces', and the price to consumers of such devices would greatly drop. For example, Apple's iPad, which cost $629 or more today, would be charged only less than $10, and even often be given away.

"More sophisticated news readers will be foldable or rollable, gesture controlled and fully interactive."

"Substantial parts of investigative journalism, writing and news production will be 'crowdsourced' to hordes of amateurs overseen by professionals," Dawson added, The Australian reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-24 23:26

The interactive unit of the Audit Bureau of Circulations will now audit newspapers' mobile content, a press release from the firm announced.

The new audit will provide publishers and advertisers with independently verified mobile usage data generated from apps, e-readers, and mobile browsers through the Verve publishing platform, as a result of its partnership with Verve Wireless.

"With all the buzz around the iPad and with use of mobile browsers exploding, newspapers and their advertisers are increasingly interested in seeing mobile metrics detailed in ABC reports," Michael Lavery, ABC president and managing director, stated in the press release.

The ABC's Consolidated Media Report, in which ABC is working with ABCi, clients of Verve will now be able to include mobile audience by device type, day and day part, unique visits, page views, audience access points by app and mobile browser or e-reader, Editor&Publisher reported. Verve currently works with more than 600 leading media companies from United States, Canada, and Europe.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-22 20:26

Worldwide Corporation Zinio, provider of digital publishing services, announced its content is among the top 10 downloads on Apple's iPad tablet, gipp.ru reported yesterday. The free Zinio Magazine Newsstand & Reader application offers international versions of 2400 magazine titles like Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire and Harper's Bazaar.

"New digital technologies and reading devices permits manufacturers to become more imaginative and to create new publishing possibilities, making magazines more dynamic," said Ruslan Hromin, vice-president of Zinio's Russian division.

The tablet provides the ability to use the multi-touch screen to obtain a single magazine or a subscription. Afterwards, the magazine is available on various platforms like the iPad, iPhone or personal computers.

The digital editions of the magazine are currently more or less identical to the print, according to gipp.ru. In the future, all digital titles backed by Zinio would be converted to a "special dynamic" variation for the iPad. So far, only a few titles have special iPad versions, including MacWorld, National Geographic and Spin.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-04-22 12:17

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