Date

Mon - 25.09.2017


micropayments

The New York Times has filed a trademark suit against Kachingle after the micropayment service included several of the newspaper's blogs without its permission, paidContent.org revealed yesterday.

"The suit notes that Kachingle has attempted to market its services to consumers, based on the expectation that the NYTimes.com will start charging readers for access next year," explained paidContent.org. However, the company sued for the unauthorised usage of the paper and blogs' logos and names rather than its content.

Since September 2010, Kachingle, which describes itself as "an alternative to a forced, solitary paywall," charges The New York Times' readers a "voluntary contribution of just $5/month" to access the blogs. Under the campaign "Stop the paywall," Kachingle launched a website as an alternative to newspaper's announcement about a proposed paywall for January of 2011.

According to the suit, the micropayment company initially approached the newspaper in 2009 to request access to the blogs in exchange for the fees collected from users without mentioning that it would keep 15 percent of the money. However, the media publisher said it was not interested in the partnership.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-19 18:38

Will consumers pay for online news and entertainment contents that are now free?

According to a recent Nielsen survey which covered more than 27,000 consumers across 52 countries, 85 percent said they would like free content remain free. However, when asked based on specific types of content, survey participants are more likely to at least consider paying for particular categories, especially if they have ever done so, the research company said in a blog post.

Will Pay / Won't Pay

Online content for which consumers are most willing to pay, or have already paid, are those which are usually paid-for offline, such as movies, music, games and current television shows. They always cost a lot to produce.

Consumers are least likely to pay for what is "essentially homegrown online," which is produced at fairly low cost, including social communities, podcasts, consumer-generated videos and blogs.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-02-16 23:02

Content wants to be free, and the nature of the Internet makes that possible - this has long been the refrain against paid online content. But as print sales and advertising have been on a downward spiral, made even worse by the global financial crisis over the past year, the argument for paid content has resurfaced, and this time, it's stronger. If news publishers haven't already put up some form of a paywall, they are seriously considering it.

However, one hurdle many general news outlets haven't considered yet was voiced by Alan Mutter. "One of the problems is newspapers fired so many journalists and turned them loose to start so many blogs," he told The New York Times. "They should have executed them. They wouldn't have had competition. But they foolishly let them out alive."

Image: Glenn Karlsen's flickr photostream

Competing with former employees is not yet a major consideration, but could become one as newspapers and other content creators push forward with plans to make some or all online content paid.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-29 22:52

If newspaper or magazine content online was no longer free, 80 percent of consumers say they would not pay for access, a new Forrester Research report has found.

The remaining respondents who were willing to pay are split on how to pay: 8 percent said they would prefer a subscription for all online content, and another 8 percent said they would like one subscription to cover print, online and mobile. Three percent, meanwhile, said they would prefer to pay per article.

Because not everyone can agree on whether - or how - to pay, it's clear that giving consumers a choice, from free content to different types of paid content, may be the way to go, suggests Forrester's Sarah Rotman Epps.

"There's no one delivery platform, and no one pricing model, that will satisfy all consumers," she writes.

Meanwhile, almost 50 percent of North American editors have said they doubt paid content is the only answer, the American Press Institute reported in September. The API urged publishers look to the five-point plan put forth earlier this year by the Newspaper Association of America. The five points involve "doctrines" respecting true value, fair use, fair share, digital development and consumer-centric practices.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-19 23:45

Google has proposed a system of micropayments to access news content that it hopes to put in place during the next year, The New York Times reported Thursday.

The proposal was part of a submission to the Newspaper Association of America, which had made a request from a number of technology companies for paid content models.
The micropayment system, posted by Nieman Journalism Online, will act as extension of the online payment system, Google Checkout, launched in 2006 to compete with eBay's PayPal system.

"While currently in the early planning stages, micropayments will be a payment vehicle available to both Google and non-Google properties within the next year," Google stated. "The idea is to allow viable payments of a penny to several dollars by aggregating purchases across merchants and over time."

The document said the Checkout application would be available for newspapers to charge for subscriptions but at this stage is "fairly rudimentary."

The search engine giant said paid content revenue could also allow Google to rely less on advertising revenue.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-10 19:38

Social networking site Facebook is planning to implement an experimental micropayment system on its site in the coming weeks, paidContent reported.

Reports say the payments would be required to use Facebook applications, and the payees' information would be stored on the site for further use once they are entered. Facebook has yet to confirm or give details on the micropayment plan.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-12 13:46

The Wall Street Journal's pay per view online newspaper is set to include a model that will charge nonsubscribers micropayments for one time access to individual articles, CNet news reported Sunday.

Robert Thomson, editor-in-chief of Dow Jones and managing editor of the Journal, told the Financial Times that the newspaper hopes to adopt "a sophisticated micropayments service" by autumn. The service will allow sporadic users of the newspaper's Web site to access articles behind paid walls without having to pay the $100 plus price for an annual subscription.

The move represents the Journal's continued development of its uniquely successful paid for online content model. It is also an attempt to further progress toward helping the Journal make money from the Internet, as traditional models reliant on advertising have proved flawed, and have been exacerbated by the global financial crisis.

New York newspaper Newsday was the most recent newspaper to announce its planned transition into a paid content Web site.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-11 13:33

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