Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


media links

by Tom Rosenstiel

There are few things journalists like to discuss more than, well, themselves and the long-term prospects for their industry. How long will print newspapers survive? Are news aggregation sites the future? Or are online paywalls -- such as the one the New York Times just launched -- the way to go?

As media organizations plot their future, it's worth discarding some misconceptions about what it will take to keep the press from becoming yesterday's news.

Continue reading on the Washington Post

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-11 11:16

In 2007, two years into the launch of the Huffington Post, cofounder Jonah Peretti coined a term for news sites that disguise how little investment actually goes into most of their content: the mullet strategy. Named after a much-mocked hairstyle that's short and neat in front but long and unkempt in back, mullet strategists maintain a spiffy, well-groomed front page they can show to advertisers while serving most of their actual page views on a constellation of low-quality discussion boards, sexed-up celebrity news bits and user- or auto-generated content.

Continue reading on Forbes.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-11 10:16

by Dean Roper

When 85 percent of their revenues come from print, says Kasturi Balaji, Managing Director of Kasturi & Sons in India, newspapers had better not scrimp on offering the best newspaper products to their readers. Mr. Balaji spoke at the WAN-IFRA Printing Summit 2011 Conference in Mainz, Germany.

Based in Chennai, Kasturi & Sons are the publishers of The Hindu, an English-language daily newspaper with a circulation of 1.5 million copies, and Business Line with 180,000 circulation, among other titles.

The company prints at 15 print sites, 12 of them owned by Kasturi & Sons, and three use heatset technology to print newspaper titles. That is what sets the company apart.

Since 1998, Kasturi & Sons have printed most of their newspaper products on double-width presses, many equipped with hot-air dryers. The company offers a number of niche, high-quality semi-commercial products, all bringing in significant new revenue streams.

For that new revenue, there are press-related and mailroom issues to consider, Mr. Balaji says. For the press, quality, formats and enhancements play major roles. But warning about quality, he says, "It is important to be realistic about quality expectations. Adding a dryer to a newspaper press does not make it a commercial press. While it may be somewhat easier to retrofit devices like stitchers and gluers, the same cannot be said for hot-air dryers, for example."

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-10 10:02

Instead of limiting its next app to one device like the iPad, Fortune magazine has built a new app to run inside web browsers on a variety of platforms. And although the app, called Fortune500+, will only run only on desktop and laptop browsers at first, it will soon run on tablet browsers too.

As a web app, Fortune500+ joins what seems to be a slowly rising tide of apps that run in web browsers instead of the operating systems of particular devices.

Continue reading on Ad Age Mediaworks

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-10 09:33

Years in the making, a complex new set of rules for measuring newspaper circulation officially launched with the release today of results for the six-month period that ended March 31. Total paid circulation is gone as the top-line measure. In its place is a summary number for total average circulation, both paid and "verified."

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-10 09:11

A pioneering new eco-font for newspapers - believed to be the first of its kind in the country - which cuts down on ink but does not alter quality, has been developed by specialists at regional media company Archant.

Continue reading on InPublishing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-09 10:00

By Tabelo Timse (AFP)

JOHANNESBURG -- Five newspapers line a vendor's makeshift table built from cardboard and sticks but most customers go straight for Isolezwe, one of South Africa's growing Zulu-language dailies.

"I guess people feel comfortable reading in their language," says Blessings Kupe from his stand at a busy Johannesburg taxi rank where he offers the country's most-read papers, all English titles like Daily Sun and The Star.

Continue reading on Google

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-09 09:47

by Robert Niles

I'd like to point you toward a post from Dallas NBA team owner and Internet entrepreneur Mark Cuban which I hope will get you thinking, but might just get many of you mad instead:

[...]here's a taste:

In the year 2011, I'm not sure I have a need for beat writers from ESPN.com, Yahoo, or any website for that matter to ever be in our locker room before or after a game. I think we have finally reached a point where not only can we communicate any and all factual information from our players and team directly to our fans and customers as effectively as any big sports website, but I think we have also reached a point where our interests are no longer aligned.

Continue reading on The Online Journalism Review

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-08 11:20

Time Inc., the country's largest magazine publisher, has reached a deal with Apple Inc. (AAPL) to make all its iPad editions free for print subscribers, marking a break in the impasse between publishers and Apple and lending support to Time's contention that it's business-as-usual after the ouster of its chief executive.

Starting Monday, subscribers to Sports Illustrated, Time and Fortune magazines will be able to access the iPad editions via the apps, which will be able to authenticate them as subscribers. Time Inc.'s People magazine already had such an arrangement, but readers of most publications have had to pay separately for the iPad version regardless of their subscriber status.

Continue reading on Morningstar

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-08 11:03

by Ken Doctor

What's a story worth?

Last week, I looked at a single investigative story (California Watch's "On Shaky Ground"), and we saw the tab of half a million dollars for a 20-month-long tale of sleuthing. What about that ordinary daily story, quotidian journalism as we know it -- the grinding out of less eventful articles, the kinds of things that keep us informed but don't offer epiphanies? How much does it cost, and how much does that matter to the future of the news business?

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-08 10:37

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