Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


media links

The Guardian announced today on its Developer Blog that the paper is launching the Miso Project, an open source toolkit which will help make the creation of infographics and interactive content a lot easier and faster. The first part of the project is the release of Dataset, a Javascript library.

TechDirt reported that search engine Meltwater attacked the Associated Press' lawsuit against its tracking news service as a "misuse" of copyright law. Read the rest of Meltwater's statement here.

Patrick B. Pexton of The Washington Post highlights the dangers of blogging and aggregation by examining Elizabeth Flock's blog errors and ultimate resignation, suggesting that the Post itself gave her little guidance and failed in its obligation to train her. Flock resigned after publishing a story about Mars life without citing the publisher of the original article, Discovery News, as a source.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-23 16:39

Chicago Tribune reporter Rex W. Huppke wrote a satirical obituary for facts (cause of death: Rep. Allen West's assertion that 81 Democrats in the US House of Representatives are Communists). Read the story behind the op-ed piece Facts, 360 B.C.- A.D. 2012 on Jim Romenesko's blog.

Bobbie Johnson from GigaOm takes a look at Norwegian tabloid Dagbladet's online video player that "collects seven different video feeds and allows website visitors to easily flip between coverage from inside the courtroom, the courthouse, background interviews and commentary on the street or from pundits in the newspaper’s own studio."

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-20 17:24

The Sun's royal editor was arrested this morning as part of Scotland Yard's investigations into corrupt payments made by journalists to police and public officials, reports Press Gazette. The publication states that the arrests were made based on evidence provided by the controversial Management and Standards Committee, which was set up by News Corp to investigate allegations of wrong-doing in the wake of the News of the World phone-hacking scandal.

Also according to Press Gazette, Google is funding a project intended to help news entrepreneurs in Europe get ahead in the industry. The University of Lancaster’s Media and Digital Enterprise initiative (MADE) is now accepting applicants for a weekend of intensive media classes for 30 aspiring news entrepreneurs.

Jim Romenesko has published a list of the total pay received by executives at nine different US newspaper companies in 2011. The sums range between $2.9 million and $25 million, and at some companies rose by over 35%.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-19 17:45

Social networks are the new hotspots for breaking news: Mashable highlights a new infographic created by Schools.com that shows "how social media is replacing traditional journalism as a news source."

Politico's premium news service Politico Pro is popular among American policy makers, Nieman Journalism Lab reports. Politico Pro, launched a year ago, covers technology, energy, health care, and transportation policy, delivering essential content to mobile subscribers quickly.

GigaOm reports that in Italy a controversial former proposal, which suggested that online publications that receive complaints should have to alter their content within 48 hours or else pay a fine of €12,000, has been resurrected.

A cartoonist at The Economist has animated the publication's style guide. Journalism.co.uk has just posted the video on its website.

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-18 13:44

Last month’s circulation figures reveal that circulation of The Sun Sunday have fallen to 2.4 million a week, reports Press Gazette . On the day it was launched in February, the new News International Sunday tabloid sold 3.2 million copies.

One golden egg becomes many: media expert Ken Doctor suggests that the future of news publishing lies not in one big cure-all for print losses, but with assembling a combination of many small ventures to rebuild the industry piece by piece. Read his “newsonomics ” on Nieman Journalism Lab.

Mashable reports that British blogger John Graham Kerlen was convicted of tweeting “grossly offensive malicious communications” about Bexley Councilor Melvin Seymour and now faces up to six months of jail time. Kerlen, who used profanity in the tweets, was initially charged with harassment.

The BBC College of Journalism’s Elise Wicker describes how small, cheap hand-held cameras are being used to boost the world service’s reporting.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-16 16:49

Washington Business Journal reported that USA Today Publisher David Hunke will be retiring. The Gannett-owned newspaper has also been looking for a new editor-in-chief since John Hillkirk left the post in November, the article said.

Hearst has launched a new digital lifestyle magazine titled Good Ideas, a sister publication of Good Housekeeping, PressGazette reported. Designed to be read on mobile devices, the magazine will also be available in print.

According to AsiaOne news, South African newspaper The Star launched a new tabloid edition, which will be aimed towards a black audience. Star Africa will focus on news and culture for working-class townships, the article said.

Idea Lab reports that the Knight-Mozilla Partnership is refocusing and expanding: read about the changes here

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-11 17:50

The Wall Street Journal reports that Yahoo has announced it will be laying off around 2,000 employees – 14% of its total workforce. The Journal states that the decision has been “long-expected” as the digital company has been struggling with a lack of revenue growth and decreasing traffic to some of its sites. According to a source, further cuts are anticipated.

Foreign Policy magazine writes that, despite earlier commitments made by the US government to preserve “Internet freedom”, the US produces a high proportion of the tools used around the world to supress freedom of speech online.

Bambuser, a video broadcasting service, joins forces with the Associated Press to allow users to share citizen journalist videos directly with the wire service, according to thenextweb.com. Bambuser users have covered events in Egypt and Syria.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-04 17:17

Using data gathered by citizen journalists, activists are attempting to use algorithms to accurately map out the death toll in Syria, creating tools such as Syria Tracker, according to Popsci.

Reuters reports that Belgian start-up Paycento has developed a one-click payment system linked to Facebook and Twitter accounts. Users will be able to purchase single articles without having to enter credit card information each time, according to the article.

The Columbia Tribune released a new web-based iPad app that uses HTML5 technology, so users can access the app directly through the website, Editor and Publisher reported.

According to JimRomenesko.com, The Washington Post is forming a syndication service which merges The Washington Post Writers Group and The Washington Post News Service with Bloomberg News.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-03 17:20

Women's Wear Daily examines the "cult of the brand": how magazine editors are becoming more and more focused on expanding their brands into other business markets while trying to maintain editorial excellence.

NYU recently released a list of "The 100 Outstanding Journalists in the United States in the last 100 Years," according to Poynter. See if your favorites made the cut here.

AllThingsD reported that Yahoo plans to lay off thousands of employees next week, most likely within the product, marketing, and research sectors of the company.

Bloomberg and Reuters are positioned to dominate in the news industry due to their gains in subscriber revenue and increased staff numbers, AdWeek suggests.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-02 17:04

The Wall Street Journal reports that Google will soon start selling its own Android-powered tablets. Google previously tried to capture the smartphone market with the Nexus One.

The Economist announced that it has officially reached 1 million fans on Facebook, journalism.co.uk reported.

POLITICO will be joining The Charlotte Observer in the creation of a daily newspaper that will cover the Democratic National Convention this September, according to its website. For the 2008 convention, POLITICO teamed up with The Denver Post and the St. Paul Pioneer Press.

The European Journalism Centre reported that a documentary titled 18DaysinEgypt, co-founded by American documentary filmmaker and journalist Jigar Mehta, features crowd-sourced material of the revolution in Egypt.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-30 16:39

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