Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


media links

The Big Issue, a magazine founded to help the homeless, publishes its 1,000th issue today, reports Journalism.co.uk. The article quotes John Bird, one of the publication’s founders, who says that this milestone makes him feel “a mix of joy and discomfort, largely because we've achieved a lot, but we've still got more work to do."

Poynter provides some handy tips about using audio more effectively in multimedia stories. Among other things, the article advises journalists to use sound to provide extra detail for stories, and suggests that they use layers of audio to create a richer listening experience.

Nieman Lab’s Adrienne LaFrance compares the video games industry and the journalism industry – and looks at how the growth of the internet has disrupted both. LaFrance argues that he way that the games industry has adapted to the change has a lot to teach publishers.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-14 17:23

Journalism.co.uk reports that News Corp has seen its net profit jump by 47% for the first three months of 2012, compared to the same period the previous year, in spite of having spent $167m on its legal response to the phone hacking scandal. Although the company saw its total operating profit grow by 23% year-on-year, operating profit at the company’s publishing division fell by 19%, says the article.

The publisher of Mail Online, Martin Clarke, has appeared before the Leveson inquiry and has warned that over-regulation would damage the UK newspaper business, writes Press Gazette. “If we don’t allow UK newspapers to compete effectively in this online world then we aren’t going to have much of an industry left to regulate,” said Clarke, according to the article.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-10 12:55

Defamation reform was included in the Queen’s Speech to the British parliament today, Press Gazette reported, a move which the Libel Reform Campaign said would “open the way to ending libel tourism” and protect free expression. England has notoriously tight libel laws and the Libel Reform Campaign, which includes Index on Censorship, has been campaigning for reform since November 2009.

Kenya is “riding a social media wave,” reports Al Jazeera, and even outside cities, Twitter is being used by police to alert townspeople about goings-on.

10000 words blogger Elana Zak takes a look at how The Wall Street Journal is using Facebook to cover Facebook. The newspaper is making use of Facebook’s Timeline tool to cover the social networking giant’s IPO with a dedicated Facebook page.

China has expelled Al Jazeera English correspondent Melissa Chan from the country, forcing the news organisation’s bureau to close. The Arabic service will remain, however, noted Poynter.

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-05-09 16:41

The Columbian rebel group Farc has announced that they have captured Romeo Langlois, the French journalist who went missing a week ago, reports The Guardian. According to the paper, a Farc representative said that Langlois had been lightly wounded on the arm, but was not critically ill.

An article in the Columbia Journalism Review about a filmmaker who accidentally exposed the details of his sources to Syrian intelligence sources suggests that many journalists still don’t understand how to protect their communication properly in the digital age.

Online journalists can often feel under pressure to produce huge amounts of content, to be published instantly. One consequence can be that copy errors slip through the net. To combat these problems, Poynter has suggested six ways that journalists can clean up their articles.

For anyone looking for some good news, Say Daily has published a list of six ways that digital publishing is getting better.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-07 17:09

Trinity Mirror chief executive Sly Bailey has stepped down after growing anger from shareholders about her £1.7m pay package, reports The Guardian. The article notes that in March the publisher posted a 40% drop in pre-tax profits for 2011 and that Trinity Mirror’s share price has fallen by 90% since Bailey became CEO in 2002.

Somali journalist Farhan Jeemis Abdulle was shot and killed on Wednesday, as he was walking home from the private radio station where he worked, writes CPJ. According to the article, Abdulle’s colleagues said he had received anonymous threats a few days before he was killed.

Arianna Huffington’s role at AOL has been reduced, according to an article in The Hollywood Reporter. After AOL bought the HuffPo, Huffington was put in charge of all the company’s editorial operations. But speaking at Business Insider’s Start-up 2012 conference yesterday, Huffington said she has now asked, “to be freed up to just concentrate exclusively on HuffPost,” states the article.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-04 16:12

“A free press is an essential cornerstone of any country based on democracy.”
Today is World Press Freedom Day. Please join us in spreading the word. #WPFD

The Christian Science Monitor, which switched its main emphasis from print to online three years ago, is aiming to be self-sufficient by 2017, and its editor, John Yemma, tells Poynter's Rick Edmonds that "he expects to get there ahead of schedule."

In the context of the British inquiry into the press, the Guardian reported that Lord Justice Leveson has indicated that the second part of the Leveson inquiry, which was due to investigate the extent of crimes committed at News International and other media organisations, may not go ahead.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-05-03 16:51

All Things D reports that revenues have dropped over the last three months at Time Inc., the biggest magazine publisher in the world. According to the article, operating income fell by 38% and revenue shrank by 3% last quarter.

Citizen photo wire Demotix is partnering with Storyful to create a “real-time social newswire,” reports Journalism.co.uk. The article quotes the official press release, which states that Demotix content will be "delivered through a dedicated channel on the StoryfulPro platform". The feed will feature content that has been verified by Storyful alongside rights-cleared images from Demotix.

In the UK, the high court has ruled that, for a product to be defined as a “newspaper”, it must contain news, but it does not have to be paper. According to Press Gazette, two judges who were deciding the case of an individual accused of illegal street trading, found that a publication does not have to be a specific shape or size to be defined as a newspaper.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-02 17:50

The Guardian reports that Honduran television presenter Noel Alexander Valladares was killed by gunfire, along with his brother and bodyguard. Valladares is the third journalist killed in Honduras this year alone.

According to Mail & Guardian Online, the Press Freedom Commission in South Africa has released a set of recommendations for new regulations of the press, including hierarchical penalties for "journalistic infractions." The report, which is the product of eight months of research, also proposes a system of "independent co-regulation" of the press, the article says.

Vogue's controversial article about the wife of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad is no longer accessible on the internet, The Washington Post reports. The profile, which placed Asma al-Assad in a glamorous light just before her husband's regime began attacking its own citizens, garned a great deal of criticism when it was published.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-26 17:30

In light of Rupert Murdoch's testimony for the Leveson Inquiry today, Mashable examined how three news organizations, The Guardian, Pro Publica, and BBC, have been using digital technology to report on the investigation into the News of the World hacking scandal. Some of the tools used include interactive timelines and live broadcasts of the trial.

Poynter reports that The McClatchy Co. lost $2.1 million in its first quarter, a loss in revenue of 5.1%.  Advertising revenue also fell 6.8%, the article said.

Bradley Manning, the alleged WikiLeaks source, is contending that the case against him should be dropped due to the government's witholding of evidence, Reuters reported. If convicted, Manning may be sentenced to life in prison for leaking classified US documents.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-25 16:55

The Financial Times HTML5 app has reached more than 2 million users after launching 10 months ago, The Guardian reported. The web app, which users can access on a tablet internet browser, was created to bypass Apple's policies regarding subscriber information garnered through native apps.

The Wall Street Journal launched a new platform for on-the-go readers which allows for continuous streaming of data, according to Nieman Journalism Lab. The platform, called Markets Pulse, will feature a combination of articles, tweets, photos, and videos related to financial markets.

Poynter discusses eight tactics that news organizations can use to reach young readers, including hiring more young people who better reflect the targeted audience and being careful not to alienate young readers with strong paywalls. Read the rest of the strategies here. 

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-24 16:38

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