Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


Management

Last month it may have seemed that Ashley Highfield, appointed CEO of Johnston Press last July, wasn't moving forward with plans to restructure the company particularly quickly.

But now it appears that changes are taking place at the publisher. The Scotsman, one of the biggest papers owned by the group, reported yesterday that three Johnston Press executives were "in consultation over their future with the publishing company".

One of these is Michael Johnston, divisional managing director for Scotland and North-East, who is the last member of the company's founding family to still work with the group. 

Were Johnston to leave the company, his departure would mark the end of a long history; Johnston Press was founded as a printing business in Falkirk 1767 and bought its first newspaper, the Falkirk Herald, in 1846. 

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-23 17:37

In July last year, Lord Chris Patten, Chairman of the BBC Trust said that high senior management pay was "one of the most toxic reasons for the public's lack of sympathy for the BBC".

Today it's clear that his concerns have been taken head on, as The Guardian reports that the BBC actually exceeded its 2009 target to cut its top management bill by 25% and its number of managers by 20%.

The BBC has slashed the amount it pays for senior managers by 27%, and the actual number of those managers by 24%.

The deadline for the savings was originally set for 2013, but it was later brought forward to the end of 2011.

The cuts bring the number of senior managers down to 484 as of December 31 2011, compared to 640 in 2009, reports Digital Spy.

According to the BBC's website, it anticipates making savings beyond its original objectives in other areas as well. The broadcaster writes that of a planned £2bn of savings between 2007 and 2012/13, "we have already delivered £1bn of savings in the first three years and are on course to exceed our targets."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-12 18:53

by Michele McLellan

Since 2007, Knight-McCormick leadership programs at the Knight Digital Media Center have given me a front-row seat at the transformation of news leadership to meet the demands of the digital age.

The more than 100 news leaders who have participated in the programs faced a dizzying array of choices about how to best shape a digital strategy, navigate tricky organizational sandpits as they implement it, and adjust and reset their tactics each time an innovation or a new cutback hits.

Continue reading on MediaShift

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-07 09:51

The CEO of Chicago-based media company Tribune Co. will resign this week, sources told the Los Angeles Times. Randy Michaels will be replaced by a four-member office, which will include LA Times Publisher Eddy Hartenstein, President and Publisher of the Chicago Tribune Media Group Tony Hunter, Tribune's chief investment officer Nils Larsen, and chief restructuring officer Don Liebentritt.

News of Michaels' expected resignation came out after the Tribune board met Tuesday night, Variety reported. His resignation was ushered in after questionable behaviour was first reported earlier this month in a scathing article by The New York Times' David Carr, in which Michaels and other executives were accused of creating management and work culture that came to "resemble a frat house."

Image via the Washington Post. Randy Michaels in December 2007, shortly after he was appointed CEO of the Interactive and Broadcasting divisions of Tribune Co.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-21 21:10

As mediation talks broke down in the Tribune Co. bankruptcy case this week, the U.S. publisher is also being scrutinised following a report by The New York Times' David Carr on the inappropriate work culture ushered in as executives took their places under Sam Zell in 2008. Tribune management and work culture quickly came to "resemble a frat house, complete with poker parties, juke boxes and pervasive sex talk," Carr writes in the detailed article.

Zell took the company private in 2007 in an US$8.2 billion deal. Under the leadership of Zell and Randy Michaels, a former radio executive who was promoted to chief executive at the company in December 2009, it was initially thought the two would "breathe innovation and reinvention" into the company. Rather, the new leadership definitely changed the work culture, but through questionable management behaviour, sources told Carr.

Image: Wall Street Journal

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-10-07 22:33

Although 85 percent of public relations practitioners in the United States are women, 80 percent of top management in the field are male, according to numbers from the Public Relations Society of America, reported by Ragan.com yesterday. And, although females dominate the field, they also generally earn less than men.

"Any time a profession becomes feminized, salaries tend to become depressed and the status of the profession tends to go down," said Brenda Wrigley, chairwoman of the PR department at Syracuse University. She pointed to the nursing field as another example, the article noted.

Image: Mad Men, via TVWeek

Women are drawn to PR because "entry-level skills match well with what they earn in educational areas with large representation of women, such as the humanities. Women have tended to be good at writing, presentation, event planning and technician skills," the article states.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-05 18:29

The first annual World Newspaper Future & Change Study is a global research study about newspaper publishers' business strategies moving forward for the next five years, with the key objective to inspire newspaper executives to invest and innovate their business units and business practices, according to the latest SFN's report, Charting the Course for Newspapers.

The purpose of the study is to pinpoint the business and strategic challenges of the world's newspapers, and then to identify the publishers' strategies moving forward to turn the challenges into opportunities.

It's worth pointing out that as the survey targeted senior decision-makers, it is perhaps not surprising that overall they showed greater levels of confidence in their own aptitude for change. They were much less confident about operational-level staff.

Strategic management and the board members are thought to have the greatest appetite for change, with the average score of 3.71 and 3.39 on a 5-point scale (while 0 = Not at all ready, 1 = Just started to prepare, 2 = Somewhat ready, 3 = Quite ready, 4 = Fully prepared).

Least prepared for change are thought to be journalists, pre-printing staff and administrative support staff, ranking them lowest amongst the 12 categories with means of 2.9, 2.77 and 2.65, respectively.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-02-15 22:35

The Daily Sentinel, newspaper of record for Grand Junction, Colorado, today publishes its first edition in the hands of Seaton Publishing Co., a family-owned U.S. media group based in Manhattan, Kansas, The Associated Press reported yesterday.

The 116-year-old newspaper said readers would not feel a change, except for an upgrade in the Web site, according to an article posted to gjsentinel on Saturday.
Cox Enterprises Inc., also a privately-held concern, sold The Sentinel and The Nickel, a Grand Junction-based advertising circular, to Seaton Publishing in July, as Family Business magazine then reported.

Seaton Publishing operates dailies throughout the midwestern United States, with newspapers in Manhattan, Arkansas City and Winfield, Kansas; Alliance and Hastings, Nebraska; Spearfish, South Dakota; and Sheridan, Wyoming, The Winfield Daily Courier reported in July.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-02 17:00

Fairfax Media Chairman Ron Walker has continued to be undecided over whether he will step down from the company's board, with his latest proposal suggesting he will delay his decision until the annual shareholders' meeting in November, the Australian Business Journal reported Wednesday.

In an interview with The Australian Financial Review, Walker originally said he would retire at the end of next year. However, this prompted director and major shareholder John B. Fairfax to demand Walker step down as part of the company's "board renewal" plans.

The annual general meeting is scheduled for Nov. 10. The Australian Business Journal suggested that Walker would promote deputy chairman Roger Corbett as his successor. The Fairfax family has expressed agreement with Corbett in the chairman position, but would prefer an independent outsider. Fairfax, meanwhile, has claimed that he has enough support within the shareholders to prevent Walker from being re-elected. This support includes a number of the company's premier investors.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-23 19:50

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