Date

Fri - 24.11.2017


magazine

In 2008, U.S.-based publisher Hearst Corporation partnered with MediaEdge for a joint research initiative to learn more about how consumers felt about greener products, both in and out of the publishing world, SFN's Going Green reported.

Although the survey focused solely on magazines and not all print content, the results of the survey resonate for companies that publish quality content, especially newspapers. The environment is an important topic for readers, and content that explores that is valued.

Based on a 10-point scale where "10" meant "agree strongly" and "1" meant "disagree strongly," the majority of respondents overall, and women in particular, expressed high levels of interest and trust in green-related magazine content, the survey found.

Women value content that provides tips and advice on how to live a more eco-friendly lifestyle, with 68 percent of women saying they pay attention to these types of articles, and 48 percent of men saying so.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-26 23:40

Magazine publishers are finding new ways to connect with readers through Facebook by giving them an opportunity to read content and subscribe without leaving the social networking site, AdAge reported last week.

Until recently, companies have widely used Facebook to direct traffic to external Web sites. But coming in July or August, with the introduction of a new system being developed by e-commerce application development company Alvenda and Time Inc.'s subscription division, called Synapse, users will be able to access magazine content integrated in the Facebook news feeds as blurbs. Users will be able to expand the blurbs in order to read the full story and ads will appear along with the story on Facebook itself, without being redirected to an external link.
Users will also be able to subscribe to magazines of their choice within Facebook.

"Consumers don't want to leave where they are on the web, wherever they are," Alix Hart, VP for online marketing at Synapse, told AdAge. "Facebook is a place where we think that over the coming year there are going to be more and more opportunities to present magazine offers in a really relevant way to consumers, as they're starting to share magazine content in a much deeper way than ever before."

This new system also presents an alternative revenue maximising opportunity for publishers by integrating magazine content along with ads on readers' news feeds to grab maximum reach.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-17 22:12

The Washington Post Company owned-Newsweek.com is joining the increasing number of news publishers experimenting with cloud computing. The weekly magazine is outsourcing its Web site hosting duties to Amazon, MediaWeek reported.

Having incurred US$29.3 million operating losses in 2009, the move of shifting its hosting operations to an external host is aimed at cutting loses in its magazine division, thereby hoping to save approximately $500,000 annually.
"It saves Newsweek money," Geoff Reiss, vice-president and general manager of Newsweek Digital, told MediaWeek. "Lots of people out there built their own infrastructure and are going to be tortured by this idea of sunk costs."

Newsweek.com also underwent a redesign this week, moving to a more simple, stripped-down look, while avoiding standard media site design features like large ad units and branding statements.

"A clean, vertical orientation on the page was one of the goals. What we've seen come out of social media and blogs [is] an organization that makes sense for how people are consuming media now...brand doesn't trump user experience," Reiss told MediaWeek.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-30 21:33

Worldwide Corporation Zinio, provider of digital publishing services, announced its content is among the top 10 downloads on Apple's iPad tablet, gipp.ru reported yesterday. The free Zinio Magazine Newsstand & Reader application offers international versions of 2400 magazine titles like Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire and Harper's Bazaar.

"New digital technologies and reading devices permits manufacturers to become more imaginative and to create new publishing possibilities, making magazines more dynamic," said Ruslan Hromin, vice-president of Zinio's Russian division.

The tablet provides the ability to use the multi-touch screen to obtain a single magazine or a subscription. Afterwards, the magazine is available on various platforms like the iPad, iPhone or personal computers.

The digital editions of the magazine are currently more or less identical to the print, according to gipp.ru. In the future, all digital titles backed by Zinio would be converted to a "special dynamic" variation for the iPad. So far, only a few titles have special iPad versions, including MacWorld, National Geographic and Spin.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-04-22 12:17

The UK branch of Reader's Digest was rescued from bankruptcy by private equity company Better Capital through a £13 million management buyout, reported Business Week Friday. The move saved 117 jobs, according to The Independent.

"The iconic magazine and prize draw will continue but it should be remembered that these are just a part of a much larger business," said the outlet's Managing Director Chris Spratling. "There are tremendous opportunities for our businesses in financial services, books and health care and significant plans to expand all aspects of the Reader's Digest business in the U.K."

The Telegraph pointed out that Better Capital, owned by tycoon Jon Moulton, wouldn't be dealing with the magazine's £125 million-plus pension fund debt, with Moulton stating that there could not be a "good deal" for that particular fund. Moulton also warned that there may be more financial collapses caused by pension funds.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-04-12 12:02

Although newspaper magazines have historically been well-received by readers, Frédéric Filloux, writer of The Monday Note, believes that specialty magazines may disappear as newspapers evolve.

"From a pure editorial perspective, the "magazinification" of dailies make more sense than ever," he writes. "Breaking news and even developing stories have been captured by the web and by the mobile internet," so newspapers can offer unique content by producing more in-depth, magazine-style pieces.

For more on this story, visit our partner site, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-23 18:10

Newsweek magazine is planning to launch an English-language edition in Pakistan in September, MediaBistro.com reported. Newsweek Pakistan will be the first licensed international news magazine for the country and the eighth local edition under the Washington Post Co.-owned Newsweek brand.

Pakistan has a population of 180 million and only about 100,000 copies of English-language publications sold in a day. Newsweek's Pakistan edition will offer both local and international content, and is expected to start off with a print run of 30,000 copies, according to the Financial Times.

The licensing agreement with AG Publications Limited, a privately owned media company in Lahore, "builds on Newsweek's strategy to develop publishing alliances in important markets and follows the launch of Newsweek editions in Russia, Poland and most recently Turkey," Rhona Murphy, publisher and managing director of Newsweek International, stated in a press release posted by Asia Media Journal. She added that the "Newsweek Asia regional edition has been available in Pakistan for a long time, but this agreement gives us the opportunity to build on our base of followers by providing more Pakistan-specific subject matter."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-09 23:53

Future Publishing Group has teamed up with British broadcaster Channel Five and producer North One Television to launch a print edition of television programme The Gadget Show, World Screen reported.

The UK publisher will launch The Gadget Show Magazine in April, according to a press relase. The 132-page title will feature a retrospective on the ultimate gear from 2009, and developments of the future, with editorials from The Gadget Show's on-air team.

The TV series is one of the channel five's most successful show, and the brand's commercial initiative to go into print seems to be a good move, according to Print Week. The Gadget Show print edition will be available for sale at retail outlets throughout the United Kingdom at a cover price of £5.

"The partnership with Future is consistent with the ambitions of Five and North One to take The Gadget Show beyond the confines of TV and develop it into a major consumer technology brand. Future is the market leader in consumer technology publications so we couldn't be happier with their understanding of The Gadget Show brand and their commitment to establishing the new title and making it a huge success," Emma Derrick, Five's commercial development controller, told World Screen.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-26 20:18

Femina, South Africa's oldest magazine for women, is closing, its publisher, Liezi de Swardt announced Feb. 12, Media Update reported. However, John Relihan, CEO of the Media24 magazine division, which owns Femina, told Bizcommunity.com that the date of the "possible" closure will be decided only after consulting with staff and considering all options.

Relihan did not state whether the February issue on the shelves is the last, but insiders told Bizcomunity.com, that the end of the magazine will take place in a "matter of weeks."

Media24 bought the publication from Associated Magazines in 2006 and in August 2007 relaunched with a shift in editorial focus, targeting women ages 40 and above. It continued to see stable circulation at 37,289. However, "the brand has unfortunately not been able to gain sufficient traction in terms of circulation and advertising support to secure its financial future in the cut women's glossy category," de Swardt said.

Relihan further categorically rejected any notion about the condition of the South African magazine industry, and refused to blame the Internet solely for print media woes. According to reports, close to one million jobs were lost last year in South Africa as a result of the economic downturn, and if the Femina employees are not "resettled," they could add to the 2010's job loss statistics as well.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-24 15:02

With drops in national ad spending, many magazine publishers have chosen to drop their memberships from the Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC), or instead prefer to be audited by other firms or skip the process completely, MediaWeek reported.

ABC, considered to be a standard body for media audits, lost about 100 magazine publications in the last couple of years, of which some titles have folded. However, many 75,000 circulation and smaller titles have chosen less expensive audit firms or have completely forgone the process. The most common reason for this drop was the cost of an ABC audit, which includes related services and can reach US$10,000 a year for a small title.

Because of the cost, there is limited payoff for titles that get little national advertising, according to MediaWeek. Some magazine titles that are no longer audited by ABC include, the Chicago Reader, D Magazine, Scientific American Mind and Utne Reader.

Bryan Welch, publisher and editorial director of Ogden Publications, who ended the Utne's long-time membership with ABC, told MediaWeek in that the ABC audit proves expensive for smaller titles and the only publications that "benefit from the audit are those who get a significant amount of attention from major advertising agencies."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-23 15:07

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