Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


magazine

Apple Inc. and magazine publishers haven't been able to come to an agreement on the terms of magazine app subscriptions for the iPad, AllThingsD reported Friday. Publishers want a direct link to their clients by being able to sell the subscriptions themselves, or at least keep subscribers' data. Apple says "no."

For the past couple months, Apple has instead been offering magazines 70 percent of the revenue from each sale; the "ability to offer an opt-in form for subscribers that would ask them for a limited amount of information" such as their name, address, e-mail, etc.; and the ability to sell subscriptions to their apps through iTunes, Peter Kafka explained.

Image: bipad.net Although the publishers have a problem with the 30 percent cut of their subscriptions Apple wants, they are more miffed that the company is refusing to give them subscribers' credit card data, used for marketing. It also allows them to offer print and digital bundles, Kafka pointed out.

From the beginning, magazine publishers have been some of the iPad's biggest proponents. Conde Nast, for example, has said it expects as much as 40 percent of its revenues to come from tablets in the future, the Observer noted.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-06 22:37

After seven years of searching, Tony Elliott, the founder of UK publishing group Time Out, announced last week that he sold half the company to private equity group Oakley Capital Investments in order to fund online and digital expansion, Press Association informed.

The equity firm was thought to value the publisher at £20 (€24) million. According to Elliott, Oakley Capital will help the initiative because of "its entrepreneurial operational focus" and assist Time Out in embarking on a "hugely successful worldwide digital journey." He let slip that the publisher would not be putting up a paywall since it deals with information that was "built to last forever," The Independent wrote.

Image: Knomo

Elliott explained that the publishing house never had enough capital to correspond to its expansion plans, The Independent reported. In January, the founder had to donate £3 (€3.6) million from his own pocket to ameliorate the £8.3 (€9.9) million debt. However, last week Elliott declared that Time Out had never been under threat, according to The Independent.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-30 20:43

MEN Media, an affiliate of UK publisher Trinity Mirror, revealed that on November 25 it will launch a business magazine called Business Week for its audience in Manchester, paidContent reported.

By the end of January 2011, Business Week aims to achieve a circulation of 12,000, The Drum added. The move can be understood as a way to boost the title's presence throughout Manchester's business circle.

Image: Journalism.co.uk

"This investment shows that MEN Media are committed to producing the best in business coverage in Greater Manchester across all of our titles and websites, which will benefit the business community in the area as a whole," said MEN Media Managing Director David Sharrock.

According to Manchester Evening News, the 40-page colour title will be the only weekly of its kind in the region. Content includes news, in-depth coverage, interviews, advice and profiles, written by MEN's specialized business reporters.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-19 15:48

U.S. magazine Newsweek announced it will merge its website with that of news and commentary site The Daily Beast to form The Newsweek Daily Beast Co., AFP reported today. Both parties will have an equal stake in the newly established joint venture.

"In an admittedly challenging time, this merger provides the ideal combination of established journalism authority and bright, bristling website savvy," Sidney Harman, Newsweek's owner, said in a statement. The entity will be owned equally by Harman and Barry Diller's Internet company InterActiveCorp, which owns The Daily Beast. Directors will include Harman, as executive chairman, and Diller, as well as one director each to be appointed from either side, according to the press release.

Image: Digital Trends

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-12 17:22

Publisher Condé Nast's UK version of Vogue announced the launch of an iPad edition, available from November 6 onwards for £3.99 (US$6.44 or €4.63), Media Week reported. Nicholas Coleridge, Condé Nast's Managing Director in the UK, divulged that the digital issue made use of a platform that was specifically designed, permitting fashion photography "to come to life" while offering a "multi-sensory experience," MediaGuardian reported.

"Vogue on the iPad has given us the opportunity to put life, colour and movement into our magazine. From moving image and sound, to internet connectivity, the possibilities are exciting and engaging," said Vogue Creative Director Robin Derrick, in charge of managing the app's formation.

Image: FashionStake Blog

Advertisers present in the December print issue will also have a spot on the iPad, Media Week added. These include luxury brands Burberry, Chanel, Gucci and Ralph Lauren. Furthermore, there will be Internet-only content such as interview footage of Harry Potter actress Emma Watson.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-09 15:58

The UK edition of monthly magazine Reader's Digest revealed that on Tuesday it is embarking on a £3 million sampling campaign in hope of boosting its ABC circulation from 400,000 to 700,000 across the next three years, MediaGuardian reported today. According to The Drum, the initiative, which is intended to "revitalize" the title, will be administered by marketing firm The Network

200,000 free copies of the publication will be handed out at major transport outlets to consumers between ages 45 and 60 years across London, Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds. In addition, an A4 backboard will be present at newsstands to distinguish Reader's Digest from other titles, The Drum informed.

The larger print will also emerge in the magazine's December issue, to be issued next week. Furthermore, the December issue will have 256 pages, as opposed to the typical 160 pages.

"We have been working hard to evolve the magazine over recent months to ensure that it is as engaging and relevant to our target audience as it possibly can be. I'm excited that this activity will allow us to get the magazine into more people's hands every month, and I look forward to welcoming new readers into the fold," said Editor-in-Chief Gill Hudson.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-08 16:51

The UK version of Wired magazine has launched its first iPad edition, priced at £2.39, Journalism.co.uk reported yesterday. From 2011, the Condé Nast publication will seek to offer monthly downloads, after studying both consumers and advertisers.

"We believe the key to a successful app edition is to use multimedia to enhance storytelling rather than to distract from it: to provide video when the user really needs to 'be' somewhere, and audio when you want to hear a music track, rather than using gimmicks simply because they're an option," said Wired UK Editor David Rowan, Media Week reported.

According to Media Week, a Condé Nast spokesperson brought to light that Wired was in the process of conceiving subscription offers for loyal readers who either access the iPad app or obtain print content.

The app permits both 360 and 3D views of pictures while also offering an issue overview, a drop-down contents page, animated infographics, interactive text as well as image galleries.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-05 15:40

Elle Magazine UK has announced the launch of three additional fashion channels on its website, Brand Republic reported today. According to a spokeswoman, the initiative is a reaction to the 40 percent surge in organic traffic to the site and demand from advertisers.

"Elle UK has enjoyed phenomenal growth over the past year and I am delighted that we are able to respond by adding innovative content that will further add to the ELLEuk experience, expanding the breadth of our editorial coverage and boosting our advertising inventory," said Anna Jones, the publisher's digital and strategy director.

The title, published by Hachette Filipacchi, now has "Fashion", "Style" and "Shop" alongside previous channels like "Catwalk" and "StarStyle." In "Shop" (left), users can browse through weekly shopping selections and then be redirected to the appropriate websites. The "Fashion" channel incorporates an "Ask the Experts" section while "Style" bears tips on what to wear for specific events.

Image via Brand Republic

Elle UK had an ABC circulation figure amounting to 195,625 for the first half of 2010. It has more than 162,000 followers on Twitter, Brand Republic informed.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-02 18:16

National Magazine Company (NatMag), the UK-based division of publisher Hearst, announced it is transferring its magazine websites to the Magnus publishing platform, which will permit the group to enhance user experience and pave the way for new sources of revenue, Commerce Tuned reported. According to NatMag, the move will urge the sharing of "development and best practices," Brand Republic reported.

The Web platform was launched by Hearst Magazines Digital Media, and combines the publisher's content management, syndication, subscription marketing, community features, universal user registration as well as promotional content, Brand Republic explained. Magnus is also hoped to boost search features and present advertisers with a "technically sophisticated environment in which to engage with their target audiences."

"Our investment in the Magnus platform will create many opportunities for NatMag's websites - from the creation of new revenue streams to providing users with a more efficient and faster service, which, in turn, will help generate significant growth in traffic and attract new advertisers," said Simon Home, NatMag general manager and finance director.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-10-28 18:06

The talks between The Daily Beast and Newsweek about a possible merger ended on Monday after both companies were not able to agree on how power should be shared, The Wall Street Journal revealed.

"The engagement was fun but the pre-nup got too complex. We wish Newsweek all the best," said The Daily Beast editor-in-chief Tina Brown in a memo sent to the website staff, New York Magazine quoted.

The Daily Beast editor-in-chief Tina Brown was one of the candidates to fill Newsweek's editor position. Photo: AdPulp
According to The Wall Street Journal, if the deal had gone through Brown would have become the editor of the magazine. However, Newsweek's owner Sidney Harman, IAC/InterActive Corp CEO Barry Diller, who owns The Daily Beast, and Brown could not agree on their specific roles and how to divide business and editorial responsibilities.

In a joint memo, Harman and Newsweek's CEO Tom Ascheim said that they remain "committed to and actively engaged in the search for the best editor for Newsweek," The New York Observer quoted. In August, The Washington Post Company sold the magazine to Harman for $1. Since then, Newsweek has not had a permanent editor.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-18 23:44

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