Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


long-form journalism

A new long-form journalism websitecalled Mampoer, and based in South Africa, is preparing to launch in the near future, according to journalism.co.uk's Rachel McAthy. Mampoer, "will invite writers to submit pieces of long-form journalism to be downloadable on digital devices," McAthy writes.

Every daily and Sunday title in Northern Ireland suffered circulation declinesin the latest ABC report according to an article posted on PressGazette.co.uk. Northern Ireland’s largest-selling daily, The Belfast Telegraph, fell 9.2 percent to 53,847, the article states.

The UK's Independent says prosecutors involved in the phone hacking scandal will reveal a list of the names of up to 600 victims"within weeks."

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-23 16:54

Curation, aggregation, 140 characters, constant updates, 24 hours a day, seven days a week: despite being easier than ever to access, reading the news online can be exhausting. In this digital age we can follow a story from its birth, watch it grow, develop and fade away. The problem is that this process frequently takes place in one quick burst – over the course of a day, maybe two – infusing online news sites like the Huffington Post with a wearying frenetic quality. It’s no secret that the rush to be the first to report breaking news means that concerns such as narrative depth, context and analysis are frequently marginalised, but fortunately for those searching for respite from the onslaught of breaking news, long-form journalism is undergoing a revival.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-21 17:22

The government of Burma has taken a major step towards freedom of expression according to a report from The Associated Press and published on the Guardian's website. The country has stopped the practice of requiring reporters to submit their articles to state censors before they can be published.

Rachel McAthy on the journalism.co.uk website offers an interesting look at eight examples of long-form digital content projects.

Recovering Journalist Mark Potts highlights a vision for the future of newspaperwritten 20 years ago by Robert G. Kaiser, the then-newly appointed Managing Editor of The Washington Post, which as Potts points out, remains "a striking document, even today."

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-20 18:19

Following in the footsteps of recent long-form journalism start-ups, the PostDesk online platform launched today intent on reinvigorating discussion about long-form content among internet users, according to BetaKit.

PostDesk will cover in-depth news and analysis in the fields of tech, gaming, culture, politics and business, the article said. Only those with early invites can currently access the website, though the temporary PostDesk blog is available to all users. 

“PostDesk is a place to discuss, debate and read free, independent long form content such as in-depth news, reviews, investigative journalism, analysis, critique and controversial opinion pieces,” according to PostDesk’s CrunchBase profile.

A combination of in-house editors and outside contributors will be responsible for PostDesk’s content, BetaKit said. Readers will also have active roles in PostDesk, earning points and badges for thought-provoking comments and perhaps even being asked to contribute articles, BetaKit said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-03 12:06

What do we want? In-depth journalism! When do we want it? Now!

Two reporters have responded to this rallying cry and have announced their intention to launch a new online technology magazine dedicated to long-form, quality journalism.

Jim Giles, who has written for Nature, The Atlantic, The Economist and New Scientist, and Bobbie Johnson, European editor for GigaOm and a previous tech reporter for The Guardian, created the project, which has been named Matter.

So why does Matter matter? According to a blog post by the new team, the idea is to foster thorough, long-form journalism rather than the "fast and cheap" reporting the web has encouraged so far. In a video introducing the project, Giles spells out the problem bluntly: "The thing about long-form, in-depth journalism is that it's expensive. There used to be many more newspapers and magazines that produced that kind of content, but journalism is in financial trouble and those outlets have cut back."

Johnson says when it comes to long-form journalism "we all know how important it is, but yet we're not able to support it, we haven't built ways to do it. Frankly, if nobody sticks their neck out then it's going to die away."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-27 17:43

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