Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


layoff

Last year, the Spanish press employed 11.1 percent less workers than in 2008, according to the Editors Association of Spanish Newspapers, PRnoticias.com informed.

Newspapers reduced their staff from 11,474 employees to 10,190 mostly to cut costs and cope with the effect of the economic crisis.

General information dailies and sport publications are the ones that have done the biggest cuts of staff by 11.60 percent and 7.83 percent, respectively. Interestingly, newspapers specialized in finance have also laid off personnel without lowering their staff spending.

According the most popular publications in the country, El Pais cut the largest number of jobs (392). El Mundo let go 14 workers whereas ABC reduced its staff by 103.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-17 22:47

The Wall Street Journal yesterday advised the nine employees staffing its Boston office that, henceforth, the former heart of the financial newspaper's mutual fund coverage would be absorbed by its New York bureau, Mutual Fund Wire reported yesterday.

By way of explanation, Managing Editor Robert Thomson said the newspaper remains "in the midst of a profound downturn in advertising revenue," The Associated Press yesterday reported.

News Corp., which owns the Journal, did not announce plans to close the Boston offices of Dow Jones Newswires and MarketWatch, Reuters reported yesterday.

Plans to close the Journal's Boston bureau followed Tuesday's announcement that the Journal would stop selling a London edition and focus instead on launching a redesigned product for all of Europe in mid-November, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 17:00

The New York Times announced today it is looking for 100 more newsroom staffers to resign voluntarily by year's end, The Associated Press reported today. Failing to meet its target through that approach, the newspaper will force the issue through more obligatory layoffs starting in December.

"I won't pretend that these staff cuts will not add to the burdens of journalists whose responsibilities have grown faster than their compensation," wrote Executive Editor Bill Keller in an e-mail to employees this afternoon.

In the past year, The Times has borrowed money, sold assets, and suspended stock dividend payments in order to avoid "the disabling cutbacks that have hit other newsrooms," the Wall Street Journal reported today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-19 21:42

An announcement yesterday by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel confirmed the acceptance of buyout offers by 29 full-time and five part-time staffers, Editor & Publisher reported.

Though no names have been released, several employees who opted for the buyout offer are suspected to be longtime staff members of the newspaper. Reports include veteran columnists, reporters and critics of the paper in the list of staff that will be leaving the paper.

The deadline to accept the buyout was Monday night, with layoffs to follow if not enough employees accept the deal. The buyouts mark a third attempt by the paper to reduce staff and costs. Greg Pearson of the newsroom employees union has reported that executives for the Journal Sentinel expect to have to cut "substantially more" positions.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-31 15:04

Georgina Harvey, the managing director of the UK's Trinity Mirror has criticised the National Union of Journalist's plans to hold a one-day strike, calling it a "reckless and negligent decision," Press Gazette reported.

The NUJ's strike plans concern several regional editions of the paper in the Midlands region. The strike will protest the paper's announced closure of nine titles and the cutting of 120 positions.

Harvey suggested the decision to strike was not made by the majority of unionised journalists, saying that "it is highly frustrating that the majority of our journalists should be held to ransom like this when only 27 percent of our entire editorial workforce across the Midlands businesses voted for this action."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-24 12:44

The closure of Claremont New Hampshire's The Eagle Times will be investigated by state authorities, The Associated Press reported. In an e-mail sent Thursday, the publisher announced to employees that Friday's edition would be the paper's last.

Officials will be taking steps to establish whether the closure is an infraction of a New Hampshire state law that stipulates employers must give employees a 60-day notice before shutting their business, according to the article, posted by Editor & Publisher.

The closure will put 120 employees out of a job.

The Union Leader reported that the state's Rapid Response Team would be made available to assist laid off workers and their families.

"We did our best to continue the operations, but the economy and the changes in the newspaper industry have made it impossible to continue this business," the memo, sent by Harvey Hill, company president stated. Eagle Publications, which also includes three other weekly publications, will file for bankruptcy today, according to the memo, the Union Leader reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-10 17:20

New York's free biweekly gay newspaper, The Blade, will halt publication after their publishing company, HX Media, was sold to an unidentified party The New York Times reported.

The sale has resulted in the firing of the Blade's editor in chief along with the entire staff of the newspaper. Matthew Bank, an executive at HX Media, said, "everyone was let go, but the people on The Blade know that they may come back if The Blade is coming back."

While the future of The Blade is unsure, Bank attributed with certainty the reasons for the suspension of publication saying, "the economy and the future of print media being more difficult was definitely weighing on us."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-02 11:45

Gannett Co. Inc has proposed the lay off of more than 1,000 employees in response to the ongoing revenue declines, the Washington Business Journal reported Tuesday night.

The cuts will affect the company's community publishing division and will not reach national publication USA Today.

The first economic quarter saw Gannett's total revenue decline 18 percent, finishing at US$1.38 billion. Advertising revenue was the major loser, down 34 percent to $723 million while circulation revenue fell 3.1 percent to $300 million. This left net income for Gannett at $77.4 million down 60 percent.

Gannett has already imposed cost cutting measures on its employees, who earlier in the year were required to take unpaid furloughs and others temporary salary reductions.

The biggest move involved the closure of the Tuscon Citizen, Arizona's oldest continually running newspaper.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-01 12:09

Citing the "economic climate and change in structure," Ohio's Sun Newspapers plans to cut 115 employees by mid-August Crain's Cleveland Business reported.

The cuts are a result of a reorganisation plan proposed by the newspaper chain on June 11, which not only entails lay offs, but also a reduction in publication of 22 weekly papers to just 11 titles.

The cuts are reported to come from sales and editorial staff as well as a few cuts from the administrative and production staff.

Sun will rely on its sister paper, the Plain Dealer, to manage payroll and retail departments, as well as home delivery of the paper. Plain Dealer employees recently agreed to an 8.1 percent pay cut and 11 days of unpaid furlough in an effort to keep the paper printing editions seven days a week.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-24 12:36

A recent report posted on Gannet's blog made reference to a memo sent out by Gannett's CFO Gracia Martore in which 4,500 layoffs of newspaper staffers are predicted the Portland Business Journal reported.

According to the blog, Gannett employees should not expect any more furloughs to be imposed this year. However, Gannett's 41,000 employees of their collected newspaper and television stations can only be slightly relieved by this news, given that their industry has already suffered slews of layoffs and salary cuts.

While Gannett officials have made no further comment on the pending cuts, the blog post said that they should be effective July 8.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-23 10:47

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