Date

Fri - 17.11.2017


journalists

The UK’s National Union of Journalists is facing a “severe financial crisis,” according to a memo, written last month by the union’s general secretary Michelle Stanistreet.

In the memo, Stanistreet outlined the cuts that would be necessary in order to get the union back on track financially, including a £400,000 reduction in payroll costs and nine staff being made redundant. However, Press Gazette reports today that the union is now facing a “grassroots revolt” from members who don’t want to see the cuts go through.

According to the Stanistreet’s memo, the NUJ is suffering from a drop in subscription income, a crisis with its pension scheme, pressure on its members from the problems facing the journalism industry, and a reduction in assets and reserve cash as a result of “successive deficits.” “This combination of factors mean we have to take action,” writes Stanistreet, “sitting back and doing nothing is not an option.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-06 18:04

by Sara-Ellen Amster

As I watched the latest Spielberg movie this week with my wide-eyed 7-year-old son, I could not help thinking that the brave new world of journalism, both virtual and real, still holds cosmic power for millions of young people.

This dream is shared by Tintin, the intrepid boy reporter whose never-say-quit gumption keeps him digging deeper for the truth even when all hope appears lost. Heroes Tintin and his dog Snowy must find three puzzle pieces to uncover a buried treasure. The fantastical story was adapted from the work of Belgian artist Georges Rémi, who had the pen name Herge.

Continue reading in the Huffington Post

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2012-01-05 10:42

by Mallary Jean Tenore

Social networks have helped make journalists more accessible by breaking down barriers between the public and the media. But there's a disconnect between journalists' accessibility on social networks and their accessibility on news sites.

As a media reporter, I've often been frustrated by how hard I have to look for journalists' contact information on news sites -- and by how few usable results I get. I sometimes find nothing more than a generic email address, or a list of emails for departments instead of people.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-26 10:54

By Vadim Lavrusik, Journalist Program Manager & Betsy Cameron, Data Analyst

To enable journalists to better utilize Facebook in their distribution, reporting and storytelling, we conducted a study looking at how people were engaging with Journalist Pages on Facebook. We hope that the findings, which focus on post dynamics, engagement and activity, will provide journalists with some best practices and insights on optimizing their engagement and distribution on Facebook to better reach their audiences.

Continue reading on Facebook

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-18 11:02

Since Google+ (plus) was launched a week ago those who have managed to get invites to the latest social network have been testing out circles, streams and trying to work out how it fits alongside Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Here are 10 ways Google+ can be used for building contacts, news gathering and sharing:

Continue reading on journalism.co.uk

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-08 09:22

At least 25 percent of Spanish journalists have lost their jobs and 66 percent have seen their paychecks reduced because of the economic crisis, according to 2010 Annual Report of the Journalistic Profession published today by the Press Association of Madrid, Europa Press revealed.

When compared with 2009 results, the report shows an increase in the number of journalists who are not working from 5,155 to 5.564, out of which 66 percent are women, ABC.es informed. Furthermore, the average salary is €30,000 down from €35,000 six months ago.

Image source: russelpikemarketing.com

"The epidemic that is affecting the profession is unprecedented," said the President of the Press Association Fernando Gonzalez Urbaneja, adding there is "a mismatch between the college and the labor market."

The report pointed out that there are 72,292 journalists in Spain but only 30,000 available jobs, PRNoticias revealed. In 2010, 2.906 people graduated from journalism school and over 3,000 are expected to do so in 2011.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-14 23:22

A bill that would create harsher punishments for those who attack journalists has been submitted to the lower house of the country's parliament, Russian news agency RIA Novosti reported. However, the legislation is "not enough," said lawmaker Irina Yarovaya.

Earlier this month, two journalists were violently attacked in Moscow. Oleg Kashin was beaten outside of his home and had to be put into an induced coma, and Anatoly Adamchuk was attacked two days later, according to Journalism.co.uk.

Photo via RIA Novosti: Oleg Kashin, a reporter for Kommersant, was beaten outside his home earlier this month.
Russia has one of the worst safety records for journalists in the world, ranked fifth, behind Iraq, the Philippines, Colombia and Mexico, according tot he International Press Institute. At least 35 journalists were murdered in Russia between 2000 and 2009, RIA Novosti noted.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-30 16:57

The Italian government has extended its provision within the Media and Wiretapping Bill, "obbligo di rettifica", or rectification obligation, a law dating back to 1948 that requires newspapers or anyone "responsible for informative websites" to publish corrections, and passed a new law aimed at restraining online freedom of speech under the Berlusconi leadership, TheInquirer.net reported.

This law requires Italian bloggers, podcasters and users of social networking sites like Facebook to rectify "incorrect facts" published, and post corrections within 48 hours of receipt of complaint. Any failure to abide by the law within the timeline provided would result in the imposition of a fine of up to €25,000 to be paid by the author or publisher.

Image: Italian President Berlusconi
The European Digital Rights (EDRI), a pan-European coalition of online civil liberties advocacy organisations, and Italian journalists who call this bill "authoritarian" warn that it might darken much of the Italian cyberspace comprising of small-scale bloggers, website owners and users who comment on discussion pages, as they will be left with little or no time to deal with complaint requests and publish corrections within the time span allotted, EUObserver.com reported today.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-07-30 20:14

Compared to some parts of the world, the U.S. journalism market has experienced a more severe downturn. According to the American Society of News Editors, the country's newsroom workforce grew from about 45,000 in 1978 to more than 55,000 in 1989, but has been in a general state of decline since then. In 2006, the journalism workforce totalled about 55,000, but dropped to less than 50,000 within the next two years, SFN's Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies reported.

According to the Amerian Society for Newspaper Edtiors census for 2009, a total of 5,200 newsroom professional jobs were cut, not as high as the 5,900 in 2008. Online-only newspapers also cut 284 jobs in 2009. This caused newsroom employment to drop to 41,500, from 56,400 in 2000. The percentage of losses are higher at big metros and lower at smaller titles, according to "The State of the News Media 2010," a report by The Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism.

According to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor, the number of jobs at newspaper publishing companies in the country has plunged from more than 450,000 in July 1990 to about 300,000 in July 2009. The decline began accelerating after 2001.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-02 17:16

French Parliament on Monday night approved a legislation that protects a journalist's sources, Le Monde reported yesterday. However, while journalistic sources may be protected, it all depends on the "gravity of the crime or offense" and the "importance of the information in demand," the text reads.

The right-oriented UMP (Union for Popular Movement) and the Nouveau Centre (New Centre, also known as the European Social Liberal Party) voted for, the PS (Socialist Party) against. Meanwhile, the PCF (French Communist Part) and the Greens did not engage in the debate. The National Assembly voted the text in the same terms as the Senate, aiming for its definite passing.

The Senate adopted the text after having modified it in November 2008. According to the senatorial version, ratified by the Assembly, "the secret of journalistic sources is protected" since they serve to inform the public. Le Monde stated that the phrase "exceptionally" has been replaced with "if the given measures are strictly necessary and proportional to the pursued legitimate goal."

PS member Patrick Bloche argued that the bill had too much vagueness, especially in relation to the situations that would allow for the law to be lifted. In a statement the PS and the PRG (Radical Party of the Left) called the new law "a progress" and "a deception."

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-12-23 20:50

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